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Overclocking Sempron 2400 with KT600 chipset

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2005 9:04:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Dave Wrote:
> What brand is your board? I missed the start of the thread.
>
> Dave
>
> "Stephen Bowden" Stephen.Bowden.1o54jn@news.computerbanter.com wrote
> in
> message news:Stephen.Bowden.1o54jn@news.computerbanter.com...-
>
> Wes Newell Wrote:-
> On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 06:51:10 +0100, Stephen Bowden wrote:
> -
> The Sempron's multiplier is locked at X10. But you're right about the
> PCI clock and AGP bus. At 185MHz cpu clock (1.85GHz) the system
> crashed
> running prime95 torture test when I attempted to play realplayer at
> the
> same time.
> How do you overcome the PCI/AGP problem? I know there are people
> running semprons at 2GHz(200MHz clock) on KT600 boards using an
> increased Vcore.
> -
> Setting the FSB to 200 MHz will set the pci clock divider to 6 so the
> pci
> clock will be 33MHz. Or your board may have to be set for it in the
> bios.
> Options are usually 4:2:1, 5:2:1, and 6:2:1 for manual settings, but
> it
> may show it some other way.
> -
> At 183MHz the system seems OK although I was having lock-ups using a
> PCI
> sound board. Am at present using on-board sound. I have still not
> increased the Vcore.
> -
> My original reply had me mistakenly thinking you had a 2400+ XP (15x
> multiplier) instead of the Sempron with 10x, so their shouldn't be a
> problem raising FSB to 200MHz assuming your ram settings are correct.
> You
> will probably need at least 1.60v vcore and I'd go ahead and set it
> to
> 1.65v (default for 2000MHz XP's). If you have PC3200 ram you should
> be
> able to use a 1:1 ratio. If you have slower ram, you may have to
> adjust
> ram settings to keep the ram bus speed and CL to match your ram.
> Once you get it running properly at 200MHZ FSB, you might want to try
> for
> more. You should be able to get at least 215MHz before the pci clock
> starts causing problems, but you'll probably also have to adjust
> vcore
> and
> ram settings again.
>
> --
> Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
> My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
> Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm-
> Thanks for the help Wes.
> At 183MHz clock speed the PCI/AGP frequencies are 36/72
> At 200MHz these values rise to 40/80.
>
> Will this be a problem?
> I have no PCI cards installed.
> My video card is a Gigabyte Geforce FX5200 128 Mb.
>
> Other system details are given in first post.
> Still at 183MHz. Vcore unchanged at 1.63.
>
> I must point out that I'm not desperately seeking speed, just trying
> to
> optimize performance whilst retaining stability.
>
> Thanks again for your time.
>
>
> --
> Stephen Bowden-
Gigabyte GA-7VT600 1394


--
Stephen Bowden
April 28, 2005 12:49:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

> Dave Wrote:
> Gigabyte GA-7VT600 1394
>

Bummer. No BIOS setting for manually selecting the 6:2:1 dividers. You
could try the pinmod to fool your board into thinking it has a 200MHz FSB
CPU - http://www.ocinside.de/html/workshop/pinmod/amd_pinmod.... - by
inserting a u-shape of wire into the socket.

Dave
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 28, 2005 7:48:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 08:49:04 +0000, Dave wrote:

>> Gigabyte GA-7VT600 1394
>>
> Bummer. No BIOS setting for manually selecting the 6:2:1 dividers.

Their doesn't need to be a bios setting for the divider as it can be done
automatically once the 200MHz FSB is set. A lot of boards do it this way..
And if it doesn't then the pinmod should do it with an auto setting. The
board supports both the 3000+ and 3200+ 400FSB cpu's so it has to work.

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
April 29, 2005 8:02:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Wes Newell" <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.04.28.15.49.57.483334@TAKEOUTverizon.net...
> On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 08:49:04 +0000, Dave wrote:
>
>>> Gigabyte GA-7VT600 1394
>>>
>> Bummer. No BIOS setting for manually selecting the 6:2:1 dividers.
>
> Their doesn't need to be a bios setting for the divider as it can be done
> automatically once the 200MHz FSB is set. A lot of boards do it this way..
> And if it doesn't then the pinmod should do it with an auto setting. The
> board supports both the 3000+ and 3200+ 400FSB cpu's so it has to work.

A friend of mine has a similar board, without the 1394, and it does not set
the 6:2:1 dividers when the FSB is set to 200 when running a 166FSB CPU.
That is why I mentioned the pinmod.

If the OP has an older nVidia video card, then with the FSB up at 200 and
the AGP at 80, it should still work.

I used to run a MSI KT2 combo board with VIA 266A chipset and the max speed
in BIOS for the FSB was 164 (from 133 standard). The dividers were 4:2:1 so
the AGP was around 81MHz and PCI was 40MHz with the FSB at 164. I had an
nVidia MX440 GFX card, a cheapie network card and sound card and a 5400 RPM
Seagate HD plugged in to the KT2 Combo and I ran it at the max FSB of 164
for months with no more crashes than the Windows norm. I never had HD
corruption because of the high FSB and I was running Windows98 SE. My RAM
was PC2100 2,3,3,6 but I was running it at 2,2,2,5 at 164MHz @ 2.7V so that
should have caused problems but it didn't.

When I swapped the MX440 for a FX5700, the FX5700 also worked fine with the
FSB at 164MHz. The only time I have had video corruption is because the
video card was overclocked to far, not from a high AGP bus. I have not
owned ATI video cards but people I know have and they have found that they
are more sensitive to AGP frequency, especially for later models. One guy
had an 9600 Pro and his system would not boot if the AGP was over 69MHz (an
oddity, as most ATIs got past 73MHz, AGP).

For the OP.

Check your RAM timings. Eg, at 200 your RAM timings may be 3,3,3,8 but at
166 they may be 2.5,3,3,7. At 180 your board may be still running 2.5,3,3,7
but unless the RAM voltage is increased, it should run at or close to 200
timings, i.e 3,3,3,8. Press Ctrl+F1 in BIOS to get the advanced settings.

Download and run Prime95 torture test. Run the "Small FFT..." (the first
one) test. This one stress' the CPU the most. If it stops within 4 hrs
then the CPU voltage is probably to low. While the others test the CPU they
also test the RAM but if the test fails, you can't tell if it was the RAM or
CPU that made the test fail.

For testing the RAM, download and run Memtest86+. Run test 5 first. If the
RAM passes with no errors after 3 tests, run all the others. If you do get
errors in test 5, try increasing the RAM voltage by 0.1V and then test
again. Test5 is good to find out if your RAM voltage is too low but it is
also a good test if the timings are too low. If you still have errors after
a RAM voltage increase then increase each timing, one at a time and restest
between each. If you have double-sided RAM modules then you should set the
2T command rate.

While you are in BIOS, check the CPU timings (not FSB). Use the slowest
when overclocking.

Dave
!