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psu and venice core

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 4, 2005 9:12:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

g'day all
i just upgraded the family computer to:
MSI k8n neo4 platinum
3200 venice
a gig of corsair standard 3200 ram
pci-e 6600gt.

i had wondered as i purchased the parts whether the psu in the old case (a
300w codegen el cheapo, only 17A on the +12V) would actually run this combo,
and well, yes, it does, flawlessly. Thats with two CD-R drvies and just the
one 120gig HDD (IDE)

The question is, as i overclock this, what will be the symptoms of a waning
supply of clean power? I'm guessing the 3d function of the graphics card
might just stop working, intermittant failure to post, or perhaps blue
screens during CPU/chipset intensive stuff.

I'm reckoning i should be able to get a FSB of 250 ish, with HTT down to 4x,
mem running as close to 200MHz as i can get with the given dividers. What do
you think?

More about : psu venice core

July 4, 2005 9:39:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I was told that 300W is too low.
Of course I was told this by a pc salesman.

Have you tried this site?

http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/

They have a online psu calculator.

Bill

"Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Q5eye.14451$oJ.6155@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> g'day all
> i just upgraded the family computer to:
> MSI k8n neo4 platinum
> 3200 venice
> a gig of corsair standard 3200 ram
> pci-e 6600gt.
>
> i had wondered as i purchased the parts whether the psu in the old case (a
> 300w codegen el cheapo, only 17A on the +12V) would actually run this
> combo, and well, yes, it does, flawlessly. Thats with two CD-R drvies and
> just the one 120gig HDD (IDE)
>
> The question is, as i overclock this, what will be the symptoms of a
> waning supply of clean power? I'm guessing the 3d function of the graphics
> card might just stop working, intermittant failure to post, or perhaps
> blue screens during CPU/chipset intensive stuff.
>
> I'm reckoning i should be able to get a FSB of 250 ish, with HTT down to
> 4x, mem running as close to 200MHz as i can get with the given dividers.
> What do you think?
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2005 9:57:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

i have seen that site, but it doesn't include venice cores, nor pci-e
graphics cards, hence it is almost useless.

i can tell you right now, 300w is enough, at least for the moment.

"Bill" <billschmitt@cox.net> wrote in message
news:IEkye.25928$ro.4016@fed1read02...
>I was told that 300W is too low.
> Of course I was told this by a pc salesman.
>
> Have you tried this site?
>
> http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/
>
> They have a online psu calculator.
>
> Bill
>
> "Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:Q5eye.14451$oJ.6155@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>> g'day all
>> i just upgraded the family computer to:
>> MSI k8n neo4 platinum
>> 3200 venice
>> a gig of corsair standard 3200 ram
>> pci-e 6600gt.
>>
>> i had wondered as i purchased the parts whether the psu in the old case
>> (a 300w codegen el cheapo, only 17A on the +12V) would actually run this
>> combo, and well, yes, it does, flawlessly. Thats with two CD-R drvies and
>> just the one 120gig HDD (IDE)
>>
>> The question is, as i overclock this, what will be the symptoms of a
>> waning supply of clean power? I'm guessing the 3d function of the
>> graphics card might just stop working, intermittant failure to post, or
>> perhaps blue screens during CPU/chipset intensive stuff.
>>
>> I'm reckoning i should be able to get a FSB of 250 ish, with HTT down to
>> 4x, mem running as close to 200MHz as i can get with the given dividers.
>> What do you think?
>>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2005 10:27:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 05:57:50 +0000, Bushy wrote:

> i have seen that site, but it doesn't include venice cores, nor pci-e
> graphics cards, hence it is almost useless.
>
> i can tell you right now, 300w is enough, at least for the moment.
>
It's not so much the total watage as it is the wattage for the +12v rail.
Since your PSU offers 17A (204W) on the 12v rail then your's works fine.
Other 300W PSU's may only offer 10A or even less. These would have
problems. My old cheap 400W wouldn't run my K8 system for more than a
minute, but it's been running my K7 system for years now.

--
KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2005 4:04:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Bushy wrote:
> g'day all
> i just upgraded the family computer to:
> MSI k8n neo4 platinum
> 3200 venice
> a gig of corsair standard 3200 ram
> pci-e 6600gt.
>
> i had wondered as i purchased the parts whether the psu in the old case (a
> 300w codegen el cheapo, only 17A on the +12V) would actually run this combo,
> and well, yes, it does, flawlessly. Thats with two CD-R drvies and just the
> one 120gig HDD (IDE)
>
> The question is, as i overclock this, what will be the symptoms of a waning
> supply of clean power? I'm guessing the 3d function of the graphics card
> might just stop working, intermittant failure to post, or perhaps blue
> screens during CPU/chipset intensive stuff.
>
> I'm reckoning i should be able to get a FSB of 250 ish, with HTT down to 4x,
> mem running as close to 200MHz as i can get with the given dividers. What do
> you think?
>
>


Don't bother trying. If the PSU fails while overclocking or under heavy
load, you'll know quickly.

Buy a good quality Sparkle, Seasonic, Antec, or Enermax rated at 430W+.
Expect to pay $75-100USD.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2005 10:15:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Wes Newell" <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.07.05.06.28.56.104920@TAKEOUTverizon.net...
> On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 05:57:50 +0000, Bushy wrote:
>
>> i have seen that site, but it doesn't include venice cores, nor pci-e
>> graphics cards, hence it is almost useless.
>>
>> i can tell you right now, 300w is enough, at least for the moment.
>>
> It's not so much the total watage as it is the wattage for the +12v rail.
> Since your PSU offers 17A (204W) on the 12v rail then your's works fine.
> Other 300W PSU's may only offer 10A or even less. These would have
> problems. My old cheap 400W wouldn't run my K8 system for more than a
> minute, but it's been running my K7 system for years now.
>
> --
> KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
> Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
> My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
> Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm


and what then of overclocking? yes it runs now, but under the extra strain
of o/c?
is my estimate of the overclocking potential of this system accurate?
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2005 12:50:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 18:15:41 +0000, Bushy wrote:

>
> "Wes Newell" <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message
> news:p an.2005.07.05.06.28.56.104920@TAKEOUTverizon.net...
>> On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 05:57:50 +0000, Bushy wrote:
>>
>>> i have seen that site, but it doesn't include venice cores, nor pci-e
>>> graphics cards, hence it is almost useless.
>>>
>>> i can tell you right now, 300w is enough, at least for the moment.
>>>
>> It's not so much the total watage as it is the wattage for the +12v rail.
>> Since your PSU offers 17A (204W) on the 12v rail then your's works fine.
>> Other 300W PSU's may only offer 10A or even less. These would have
>> problems. My old cheap 400W wouldn't run my K8 system for more than a
>> minute, but it's been running my K7 system for years now.
>
> and what then of overclocking? yes it runs now, but under the extra strain
> of o/c?
> is my estimate of the overclocking potential of this system accurate?

I don't think you'll have a problem, but if you do, you can get a cheap
600W PSU with 24A +12v for $18.

--
KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2005 12:55:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Underpowering your system components could damage them.
And yes,you get sudden reboots or plain system shutdown without warnings.
Running a demanding videogame usually shows you the first time when psu is
too weak.
Ofcourse,if you calculated all your devices power usage and they add up to
below 300watt all should run fine.
The FX and other a64 cpu's use 89watt so yours should not exceed thit,use
that and see how high you go in total.
If the difference is a few watts plus or minus ,then don't take the risk but
buy a better psu.

"S.Heenan" <sheenan@wahs.ac> schreef in bericht
news:LHuye.1869937$6l.1830524@pd7tw2no...
> Bushy wrote:
> > g'day all
> > i just upgraded the family computer to:
> > MSI k8n neo4 platinum
> > 3200 venice
> > a gig of corsair standard 3200 ram
> > pci-e 6600gt.
> >
> > i had wondered as i purchased the parts whether the psu in the old case
(a
> > 300w codegen el cheapo, only 17A on the +12V) would actually run this
combo,
> > and well, yes, it does, flawlessly. Thats with two CD-R drvies and just
the
> > one 120gig HDD (IDE)
> >
> > The question is, as i overclock this, what will be the symptoms of a
waning
> > supply of clean power? I'm guessing the 3d function of the graphics card
> > might just stop working, intermittant failure to post, or perhaps blue
> > screens during CPU/chipset intensive stuff.
> >
> > I'm reckoning i should be able to get a FSB of 250 ish, with HTT down to
4x,
> > mem running as close to 200MHz as i can get with the given dividers.
What do
> > you think?
> >
> >
>
>
> Don't bother trying. If the PSU fails while overclocking or under heavy
> load, you'll know quickly.
>
> Buy a good quality Sparkle, Seasonic, Antec, or Enermax rated at 430W+.
> Expect to pay $75-100USD.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2005 1:50:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Bushy wrote:

> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In fact,
> the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong, but that just
> seems bizarre.

Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad. (Internal
resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).

--
Chris
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2005 1:50:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

i did just that, and although lots of websites tell me what a brown-out is
(something i already knew) and that it can have an effect on computers very
few state what the damage can be. The closest i got was data corruption with
the possibility of physical damage to hard drives. And this was only in the
case of brown-outs, not overloaded power supplies.

Dipping in line voltage is relatively common, and we have never had anything
electronic fail as a result of a momentary decrease, or even an extended
decrease in the AC power.

although brownouts are similar, i fail to see the application to this
situation. If you could be more specific with the way the parts fail, what
causes the failure, and perhaps even some of the physics invl=ovledthat
would be good. For the moment, i am still unconvinced that real damage can
come through a lack of power.

On a side note, have people here realised just how often people ask for
advice to correct a problem, or even just out of interest, only to be told
to just buy a new part? I'm not sure about the other inhabitants of this
newsgroup but my pockets are not infinitely deep, in fact they are quite
shallow. overcoming a problem without spending any money is, in my opinion,
always the first option.


"Chris Salter" <chriss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1120639839.13070.0@sabbath.news.uk.clara.net...
> Bushy wrote:
>
>> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In
>> fact, the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong, but
>> that just seems bizarre.
>
> Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad. (Internal
> resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).
>
> --
> Chris
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2005 1:50:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I should note however, that in this instance buying a new PSU is a
reasonable suggestion.

"Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ndNye.16170$oJ.2873@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>
> i did just that, and although lots of websites tell me what a brown-out is
> (something i already knew) and that it can have an effect on computers
> very few state what the damage can be. The closest i got was data
> corruption with the possibility of physical damage to hard drives. And
> this was only in the case of brown-outs, not overloaded power supplies.
>
> Dipping in line voltage is relatively common, and we have never had
> anything electronic fail as a result of a momentary decrease, or even an
> extended decrease in the AC power.
>
> although brownouts are similar, i fail to see the application to this
> situation. If you could be more specific with the way the parts fail, what
> causes the failure, and perhaps even some of the physics invl=ovledthat
> would be good. For the moment, i am still unconvinced that real damage can
> come through a lack of power.
>
> On a side note, have people here realised just how often people ask for
> advice to correct a problem, or even just out of interest, only to be told
> to just buy a new part? I'm not sure about the other inhabitants of this
> newsgroup but my pockets are not infinitely deep, in fact they are quite
> shallow. overcoming a problem without spending any money is, in my
> opinion, always the first option.
>
>
> "Chris Salter" <chriss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1120639839.13070.0@sabbath.news.uk.clara.net...
>> Bushy wrote:
>>
>>> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In
>>> fact, the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong, but
>>> that just seems bizarre.
>>
>> Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad. (Internal
>> resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).
>>
>> --
>> Chris
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2005 8:16:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Bushy wrote:
[...]
> I am, however, still intrigued by this idea that underpowering
> something can hurt it. Can you give examples, or some sort of
> physical explanation for this?

The most affected parts are usually the voltage regulators. SMPS regulators
(ie: the type typcially found on motherboards for generating the CPU
voltage, memory voltage, etc) are often quite tuned for their expected
voltage input. Dropping the input voltage (eg: a sagging line from a PSU) is
a double-hit: efficiency drops as you go to lower input voltages, and you
also need more current to supply the same amount of power. I don't have any
actual numbers on me at the moment, but a drop of 15% in the input voltage
(eg: 12V line sagging to 10.2V) could increase the current requirements by
25%. Aside from the raw problem of having to be able to handle the higher
current, this increases power dissipation in the voltage regulator circuit
by about 55%. This is obviously not a Good Thing.

Aside from this, most of the important bits in your computer are behind
additional voltage regulators, so a sagging but stable 12V line is unlikely
to cause much of a stability problem unless the regulators can't keep up.
The bigger problem is that the line gets a lot noisier as the PSU becomes
more stressed. This is not so easily handled by the motherboard regulators
and cause voltage drops in the supply to the CPU, RAM, etc. This is usually
what causes PSU-related stability problems, and unfortunately is ignored by
a majority of the "enthusiast" sites when reviewing power supplies.

[...]

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz ---+--- My inbox is always open
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2005 12:48:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

maybe I missed it... But what brand is your psu right now.
That's verry importand. If it's a "cheap product" (I don't mean in dollars) than you're playing with fire, if it's running on it's limit.

If it's a good-designed one (there are several good brands..) than it can stand running at the limit for quite some time, and even at breaking-down, it won't take other (expensive) parts out of order...






On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 09:17:14 GMT, Bushy <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
> I should note however, that in this instance buying a new PSU is a
> reasonable suggestion.
>
> "Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ndNye.16170$oJ.2873@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>>
>> i did just that, and although lots of websites tell me what a brown-out is
>> (something i already knew) and that it can have an effect on computers
>> very few state what the damage can be. The closest i got was data
>> corruption with the possibility of physical damage to hard drives. And
>> this was only in the case of brown-outs, not overloaded power supplies.
>>
>> Dipping in line voltage is relatively common, and we have never had
>> anything electronic fail as a result of a momentary decrease, or even an
>> extended decrease in the AC power.
>>
>> although brownouts are similar, i fail to see the application to this
>> situation. If you could be more specific with the way the parts fail, what
>> causes the failure, and perhaps even some of the physics invl=ovledthat
>> would be good. For the moment, i am still unconvinced that real damage can
>> come through a lack of power.
>>
>> On a side note, have people here realised just how often people ask for
>> advice to correct a problem, or even just out of interest, only to be told
>> to just buy a new part? I'm not sure about the other inhabitants of this
>> newsgroup but my pockets are not infinitely deep, in fact they are quite
>> shallow. overcoming a problem without spending any money is, in my
>> opinion, always the first option.
>>
>>
>> "Chris Salter" <chriss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1120639839.13070.0@sabbath.news.uk.clara.net...
>>> Bushy wrote:
>>>
>>>> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In
>>>> fact, the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong, but
>>>> that just seems bizarre.
>>>
>>> Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad. (Internal
>>> resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).
>>>
>>> --
>>> Chris
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2005 2:59:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

good answer! I'm fully convinced that an underpowered system is a bad idea,
and if your words weren't enough, the constant corruption of data on the hdd
leaves me no option but to agree!

it would seem that the computer in question just isn't all that reliable at
the moment, lots of hard drive issues, with unreadable data and stuff. I'm
gonna mark this all down to a flakey psu, and hope that the hdd isn't
physically damaged. Next week i'll purchase an antec case which comes with a
psu, 400W absolute minimum. This will mean i can put the old system back
together in the old case and just run it as a file repository/ extra
workstation.

Thanks for the help folks

Bushy


"Michael Brown" <see@signature.below> wrote in message
news:42cc201b$1@clarion.carno.net.au...
> Bushy wrote:
> [...]
>> I am, however, still intrigued by this idea that underpowering
>> something can hurt it. Can you give examples, or some sort of
>> physical explanation for this?
>
> The most affected parts are usually the voltage regulators. SMPS
> regulators (ie: the type typcially found on motherboards for generating
> the CPU voltage, memory voltage, etc) are often quite tuned for their
> expected voltage input. Dropping the input voltage (eg: a sagging line
> from a PSU) is a double-hit: efficiency drops as you go to lower input
> voltages, and you also need more current to supply the same amount of
> power. I don't have any actual numbers on me at the moment, but a drop of
> 15% in the input voltage (eg: 12V line sagging to 10.2V) could increase
> the current requirements by 25%. Aside from the raw problem of having to
> be able to handle the higher current, this increases power dissipation in
> the voltage regulator circuit by about 55%. This is obviously not a Good
> Thing.
>
> Aside from this, most of the important bits in your computer are behind
> additional voltage regulators, so a sagging but stable 12V line is
> unlikely to cause much of a stability problem unless the regulators can't
> keep up. The bigger problem is that the line gets a lot noisier as the PSU
> becomes more stressed. This is not so easily handled by the motherboard
> regulators and cause voltage drops in the supply to the CPU, RAM, etc.
> This is usually what causes PSU-related stability problems, and
> unfortunately is ignored by a majority of the "enthusiast" sites when
> reviewing power supplies.
>
> [...]
>
> --
> Michael Brown
> www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
> Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz ---+--- My inbox is always open
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2005 3:02:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

It is a 300W codegen brand psu. it came with the case. Together it only cost
me A$75 about 4 years ago, so i think by all definitions it can be regarded
as cheap.


"HaPe" <hp.vandenoord@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
news:o psti6i7mvqx1maa@amd64.lan...
> maybe I missed it... But what brand is your psu right now.
> That's verry importand. If it's a "cheap product" (I don't mean in
> dollars) than you're playing with fire, if it's running on it's limit.
>
> If it's a good-designed one (there are several good brands..) than it can
> stand running at the limit for quite some time, and even at breaking-down,
> it won't take other (expensive) parts out of order...
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 09:17:14 GMT, Bushy <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> I should note however, that in this instance buying a new PSU is a
>> reasonable suggestion.
>>
>> "Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:ndNye.16170$oJ.2873@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>>>
>>> i did just that, and although lots of websites tell me what a brown-out
>>> is
>>> (something i already knew) and that it can have an effect on computers
>>> very few state what the damage can be. The closest i got was data
>>> corruption with the possibility of physical damage to hard drives. And
>>> this was only in the case of brown-outs, not overloaded power supplies.
>>>
>>> Dipping in line voltage is relatively common, and we have never had
>>> anything electronic fail as a result of a momentary decrease, or even an
>>> extended decrease in the AC power.
>>>
>>> although brownouts are similar, i fail to see the application to this
>>> situation. If you could be more specific with the way the parts fail,
>>> what
>>> causes the failure, and perhaps even some of the physics invl=ovledthat
>>> would be good. For the moment, i am still unconvinced that real damage
>>> can
>>> come through a lack of power.
>>>
>>> On a side note, have people here realised just how often people ask for
>>> advice to correct a problem, or even just out of interest, only to be
>>> told
>>> to just buy a new part? I'm not sure about the other inhabitants of this
>>> newsgroup but my pockets are not infinitely deep, in fact they are quite
>>> shallow. overcoming a problem without spending any money is, in my
>>> opinion, always the first option.
>>>
>>>
>>> "Chris Salter" <chriss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:1120639839.13070.0@sabbath.news.uk.clara.net...
>>>> Bushy wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In
>>>>> fact, the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong,
>>>>> but
>>>>> that just seems bizarre.
>>>>
>>>> Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad.
>>>> (Internal
>>>> resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Chris
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2005 7:45:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 10:59:36 +0000, Bushy wrote:

> it would seem that the computer in question just isn't all that reliable at
> the moment, lots of hard drive issues, with unreadable data and stuff. I'm
> gonna mark this all down to a flakey psu, and hope that the hdd isn't
> physically damaged. Next week i'll purchase an antec case which comes with a
> psu, 400W absolute minimum. This will mean i can put the old system back
> together in the old case and just run it as a file repository/ extra
> workstation.
>
The last case I bought came with a so called 400W PSU. The only sticker on
the PSU was a small wite paper that had 400W on it. That's it, nothing
else, no ratings, no nothing. It wouldn't run my A64 system. Been running
my K7 system for years now though. Point being, make sure the label has
the voltage ratings on it. Otherwise your old 300W may be better.

--
KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 8, 2005 12:48:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

IMHO........ Replace ASAP


On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 11:02:10 GMT, Bushy <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote:

> It is a 300W codegen brand psu. it came with the case. Together it only cost
> me A$75 about 4 years ago, so i think by all definitions it can be regarded
> as cheap.
>
>
> "HaPe" <hp.vandenoord@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
> news:o psti6i7mvqx1maa@amd64.lan...
>> maybe I missed it... But what brand is your psu right now.
>> That's verry importand. If it's a "cheap product" (I don't mean in
>> dollars) than you're playing with fire, if it's running on it's limit.
>>
>> If it's a good-designed one (there are several good brands..) than it can
>> stand running at the limit for quite some time, and even at breaking-down,
>> it won't take other (expensive) parts out of order...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 09:17:14 GMT, Bushy <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> I should note however, that in this instance buying a new PSU is a
>>> reasonable suggestion.
>>>
>>> "Bushy" <ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:ndNye.16170$oJ.2873@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>>>>
>>>> i did just that, and although lots of websites tell me what a brown-out
>>>> is
>>>> (something i already knew) and that it can have an effect on computers
>>>> very few state what the damage can be. The closest i got was data
>>>> corruption with the possibility of physical damage to hard drives. And
>>>> this was only in the case of brown-outs, not overloaded power supplies.
>>>>
>>>> Dipping in line voltage is relatively common, and we have never had
>>>> anything electronic fail as a result of a momentary decrease, or even an
>>>> extended decrease in the AC power.
>>>>
>>>> although brownouts are similar, i fail to see the application to this
>>>> situation. If you could be more specific with the way the parts fail,
>>>> what
>>>> causes the failure, and perhaps even some of the physics invl=ovledthat
>>>> would be good. For the moment, i am still unconvinced that real damage
>>>> can
>>>> come through a lack of power.
>>>>
>>>> On a side note, have people here realised just how often people ask for
>>>> advice to correct a problem, or even just out of interest, only to be
>>>> told
>>>> to just buy a new part? I'm not sure about the other inhabitants of this
>>>> newsgroup but my pockets are not infinitely deep, in fact they are quite
>>>> shallow. overcoming a problem without spending any money is, in my
>>>> opinion, always the first option.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Chris Salter" <chriss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:1120639839.13070.0@sabbath.news.uk.clara.net...
>>>>> Bushy wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I don't see physically how underpowering a component can damage it. In
>>>>>> fact, the whole idea is counter intuitive. I'm willing to be wrong,
>>>>>> but
>>>>>> that just seems bizarre.
>>>>>
>>>>> Lookup brownouts on google, and you can see why it can be bad.
>>>>> (Internal
>>>>> resisitance, voltage variation, running out of spec etc).
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Chris
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 9, 2005 8:41:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Michael Brown" <see@signature.below> wrote in message
news:42cc201b$1@clarion.carno.net.au...
> Bushy wrote:
> [...]
>> I am, however, still intrigued by this idea that underpowering
>> something can hurt it. Can you give examples, or some sort of
>> physical explanation for this?
>
> The most affected parts are usually the voltage regulators. SMPS
> regulators (ie: the type typcially found on motherboards for generating
> the CPU voltage, memory voltage, etc) are often quite tuned for their
> expected voltage input. Dropping the input voltage (eg: a sagging line
> from a PSU) is a double-hit: efficiency drops as you go to lower input
> voltages, and you also need more current to supply the same amount of
> power. I don't have any actual numbers on me at the moment, but a drop of
> 15% in the input voltage (eg: 12V line sagging to 10.2V) could increase
> the current requirements by 25%. Aside from the raw problem of having to
> be able to handle the higher current, this increases power dissipation in
> the voltage regulator circuit by about 55%. This is obviously not a Good
> Thing.
>
> Aside from this, most of the important bits in your computer are behind
> additional voltage regulators, so a sagging but stable 12V line is
> unlikely to cause much of a stability problem unless the regulators can't
> keep up. The bigger problem is that the line gets a lot noisier as the PSU
> becomes more stressed. This is not so easily handled by the motherboard
> regulators and cause voltage drops in the supply to the CPU, RAM, etc.
> This is usually what causes PSU-related stability problems, and
> unfortunately is ignored by a majority of the "enthusiast" sites when
> reviewing power supplies.
>
> [...]
>
> --
> Michael Brown
> www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
> Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz ---+--- My inbox is always open
>More current also equals more heat. I just took out a 300w L&C and put a
>350 w Antec into my Socket A 1800 @ 2 G and dropped the CPU and case temps
>by over 10 C. I suspect the double fan setup helps immensely but fan Rpms
>are down , its quieter, cooler and running better in general.I am totally
>happy with the results and hope to get to the 2.2 G area.
July 9, 2005 4:31:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

In article <E9Mze.28723$oJ.28549@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "Bushy"
<ex(underscore)boss@hotmail.com> says...
>
>
> The HD was only a couple of years old, 2 at the most. I am aware that HDs
> fail, but it hadn't shown any signs of failure as a part of the old 1700
> system, so i can't see any reason for it to suddenly have catastrophic
> failure.

<snip>

On the other hand, you may have been the victim of a random feces
occurance.

Bill
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 9, 2005 8:17:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Sat, 09 Jul 2005 08:46:28 +0000, Bushy wrote:

> So, once this is sorted, and Win xp is reinstalled, what do you think of my
> overclocking potential. I estimate i should eb able to get a FSB of 250Mhz,
> HTT at 4x, and the memory as close to 200 as i can get. That should give me
> 2.5Ghz through the chip.
>
2.5GHz is a reasonable overclock. It will probably even go higher with
proper hardware and bios settings.

--
KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
!