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How to get wireless Connection Secured

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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May 5, 2005 1:14:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I just bought a new Dell Inspiron and hooked up my wireless (netgear) router,
etc.running windows xp and it got to the point of print out all the
information about your Network name and key, but I can't find where to put it
and my connection still says unsecured. I tried to read B.Bowman article but
she just says to upgrade to WPA but all I have is the WEP at this time. Any
ideas?
--
Thanks, Rob
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 5, 2005 3:13:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

=?Utf-8?B?Um9i?= <Rob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
news:D B9D60D8-E53F-406B-8C34-4A4AD8CDEBF6@microsoft.com:

> I just bought a new Dell Inspiron and hooked up my wireless (netgear)
> router, etc.running windows xp and it got to the point of print out
> all the information about your Network name and key, but I can't find
> where to put it and my connection still says unsecured. I tried to
> read B.Bowman article but she just says to upgrade to WPA but all I
> have is the WEP at this time. Any ideas?

Hi Rob,

Are you running Windows XP with Service Pack 2 (SP2)?
By saying "got to the point of print out all the information about your
Network name and key," it sounds like you are running XP-SP2, and that
you've launched the "Wireless Network Setup Wizard." The new Wireless
Network Setup Wizard (only in Windows XP Service Pack 2), is really the
best way to configure wireless settings, and only requires a small
capacity USB Flash Drive (UFD) to work. It's really convenient (and
fast) if you are going to configure additional wireless computers or
other devices that are "Windows Connect Now" enabled.

Devices, such as older wireless access points, that do not support
"Windows Connect Now" must be manually configured with the settings that
are generated by the Wireless Network Setup Wizard; check the
documentation that was provided with the device in order to configure
the settings.

You've probably figured most of this out already, however for the sake
of completeness, here's how it works:

You launch the Wireless Network Setup wizard (found in the "Control
Panel", and it leads you through a series of steps that allow you to
either manually create a key or have one automatically generated
(recommended); the wizard does a fantastic job of generating strong keys
(WEP and WPA). The wizard generates several files that are automatically
transferred to the UFD.

Next, you plug the UFD into all of your access point (AP) (if it is
Windows Connect Now enabled) then into your wireless XP-SP2 computers,
and finally any other Windows Connect Now enabled wireless devices.

[ Note: IF your AP is not Windows Connect Now enabled, the final step
of the wizard generates a text file of the settings that you can print
out and use to configure your APs.]

The final step of the wizard is to plug the UFD back into the first
computer, where it will provide a text file of all of the settings. You
will also be given the option to delete the settings from the UFD, or to
keep them for later use.

There is a great "Cable Guy" articale at the Microsoft Wi-Fi Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/cabl...

It explains the whole process, and leads you through the wizard step-by-
step.

--
Brit Weston, Microsoft

Please do not send email directly to this alias. This is my online
account name for newsgroup participation only.

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
rights.
May 5, 2005 3:28:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Thanks, That should do it. Also, it set it uo with WEP. How do I know it my
new dell laptop has WAP capabilities and would it be hard to convert now that
it is set up with WEP.
--
Thanks, Rob


"Brit W. [MS]" wrote:

> =?Utf-8?B?Um9i?= <Rob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> news:D B9D60D8-E53F-406B-8C34-4A4AD8CDEBF6@microsoft.com:
>
> > I just bought a new Dell Inspiron and hooked up my wireless (netgear)
> > router, etc.running windows xp and it got to the point of print out
> > all the information about your Network name and key, but I can't find
> > where to put it and my connection still says unsecured. I tried to
> > read B.Bowman article but she just says to upgrade to WPA but all I
> > have is the WEP at this time. Any ideas?
>
> Hi Rob,
>
> Are you running Windows XP with Service Pack 2 (SP2)?
> By saying "got to the point of print out all the information about your
> Network name and key," it sounds like you are running XP-SP2, and that
> you've launched the "Wireless Network Setup Wizard." The new Wireless
> Network Setup Wizard (only in Windows XP Service Pack 2), is really the
> best way to configure wireless settings, and only requires a small
> capacity USB Flash Drive (UFD) to work. It's really convenient (and
> fast) if you are going to configure additional wireless computers or
> other devices that are "Windows Connect Now" enabled.
>
> Devices, such as older wireless access points, that do not support
> "Windows Connect Now" must be manually configured with the settings that
> are generated by the Wireless Network Setup Wizard; check the
> documentation that was provided with the device in order to configure
> the settings.
>
> You've probably figured most of this out already, however for the sake
> of completeness, here's how it works:
>
> You launch the Wireless Network Setup wizard (found in the "Control
> Panel", and it leads you through a series of steps that allow you to
> either manually create a key or have one automatically generated
> (recommended); the wizard does a fantastic job of generating strong keys
> (WEP and WPA). The wizard generates several files that are automatically
> transferred to the UFD.
>
> Next, you plug the UFD into all of your access point (AP) (if it is
> Windows Connect Now enabled) then into your wireless XP-SP2 computers,
> and finally any other Windows Connect Now enabled wireless devices.
>
> [ Note: IF your AP is not Windows Connect Now enabled, the final step
> of the wizard generates a text file of the settings that you can print
> out and use to configure your APs.]
>
> The final step of the wizard is to plug the UFD back into the first
> computer, where it will provide a text file of all of the settings. You
> will also be given the option to delete the settings from the UFD, or to
> keep them for later use.
>
> There is a great "Cable Guy" articale at the Microsoft Wi-Fi Web site:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/cabl...
>
> It explains the whole process, and leads you through the wizard step-by-
> step.
>
> --
> Brit Weston, Microsoft
>
> Please do not send email directly to this alias. This is my online
> account name for newsgroup participation only.
>
> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
> rights.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 5, 2005 5:08:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

=?Utf-8?B?Um9i?= <Rob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
news:358DD0CF-89D9-4BCB-B99D-423F0D72C081@microsoft.com:

> Thanks, That should do it. Also, it set it uo with WEP. How do I know
> it my new dell laptop has WAP capabilities and would it be hard to
> convert now that it is set up with WEP.

If your new Dell is actually new (not just new to you) it probably does
support WPA. If not, you will need to upgrade your wireless network
adapters to support WPA by obtaining a WPA update from your wireless
network adapter vendor (Dell) and update the wireless network adapter
driver. You should be able to find out from the "Specifications" (Specs)
section of the documentation for your Dell laptop, or at the Dell Web
site: www.dell.com.

The real question is whether your access point (AP) supports WPA. If
not, then you will need to get a firmware update for the AP from your AP
manufacturer, if available. If a firmware update for the AP is not
available, you will not be able to use WPA without replacing your AP.

Once you have determined that all of your computer equipment supports
WPA, the process of converting from WEP to WPA is quite simple. Just run
the wizard again.
On the second screen, select "Set up a new wireless network."


At the bottom of the third screen be sure to select the checkbox
labeled:
"Use WPA encryption instead of WEP (WPA is stronger than WEP but not all
devices are compatible with WPA)"

Then go through the configuration steps outlined before.

Good luck


--
Brit Weston, Microsoft

Please do not send email directly to this alias. This is my online
account name for newsgroup participation only.

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
rights.
May 6, 2005 3:02:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi

If you have No documentation and you are Not sure what your specific
Wireless card can do, temporally switch WZC Off and use the original
Wireless Utility that came with the Card. These utilities usually cover the
gamut of what the card can do, if WPA is in presence in the Card Utility it
should work well with WZC too.

Once you learned your card's capabilities you can switch back to WZC for an
easier use of the Wireless (use one at time not both together)

More about Wireless security settings:
http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

Jack (MVP-Networking).







"Brit W. [MS]" <britw@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:Xns964D85BCEF22Bbritwonlinemicros@207.46.248.16...
> =?Utf-8?B?Um9i?= <Rob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> news:358DD0CF-89D9-4BCB-B99D-423F0D72C081@microsoft.com:
>
> > Thanks, That should do it. Also, it set it uo with WEP. How do I know
> > it my new dell laptop has WAP capabilities and would it be hard to
> > convert now that it is set up with WEP.
>
> If your new Dell is actually new (not just new to you) it probably does
> support WPA. If not, you will need to upgrade your wireless network
> adapters to support WPA by obtaining a WPA update from your wireless
> network adapter vendor (Dell) and update the wireless network adapter
> driver. You should be able to find out from the "Specifications" (Specs)
> section of the documentation for your Dell laptop, or at the Dell Web
> site: www.dell.com.
>
> The real question is whether your access point (AP) supports WPA. If
> not, then you will need to get a firmware update for the AP from your AP
> manufacturer, if available. If a firmware update for the AP is not
> available, you will not be able to use WPA without replacing your AP.
>
> Once you have determined that all of your computer equipment supports
> WPA, the process of converting from WEP to WPA is quite simple. Just run
> the wizard again.
> On the second screen, select "Set up a new wireless network."
>
>
> At the bottom of the third screen be sure to select the checkbox
> labeled:
> "Use WPA encryption instead of WEP (WPA is stronger than WEP but not all
> devices are compatible with WPA)"
>
> Then go through the configuration steps outlined before.
>
> Good luck
>
>
> --
> Brit Weston, Microsoft
>
> Please do not send email directly to this alias. This is my online
> account name for newsgroup participation only.
>
> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
> rights.
!