Question about applying Arctic Silver 5 to a 2100+

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?

Thanks.
10 answers Last reply
More about question applying arctic silver 2100
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    I find the best way to apply Arctic Silver thermal compound is to apply it
    directly to the CPU. I use the tip of the dispencer to spread the compound
    in a thin layer. I don't recommend applying it to the HS, because you will
    need to use more compound to make sure that you cover the entire CPU when
    positioning the HS.

    --
    "All problems have a simple solution! The more complex the solution, the
    more ludicrous the analogy!"
    "Swelter Weight" <drok@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:lGzVe.12743$x43.2393495@twister.nyc.rr.com...
    > I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    > on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Swelter Weight wrote:

    " I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others
    put it on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the
    other? "


    I use a tiny amount on both. I put cling film (Saran wrap) over my
    finger before I do it, so I can gently work it into any microscopic
    grooves on the heatsink. If you use your bare finger you will likely be
    adding dead skin cells, sweat and dirt to the mix.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 12:33:21 +0000, Swelter Weight wrote:

    > I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    > on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?
    >
    I applied it back into my wallet and used 30 year old wheel bearing
    grease. Thin amount on both cooler and cpu. Applied by finger.:-)
    Current temps;

    CPU Temp: +30°C
    M/B Temp: +26°C

    --
    KT133 MB, CPU @2400MHz (24x100): SIS755 MB CPU @2330MHz (10x233)
    Need good help? Provide all system info with question.
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  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    WN- [Tue, 13 Sep 2005 17:16:15 GMT]:
    >I applied it back into my wallet and used 30 year old wheel bearing
    >grease.

    Yeah, but who has 30-year-old grease laying around?

    --
    40th Floor - Software @ http://40th.com/
    iPlay : the ultimate audio player for mobiles
    parametric eq, xfeed, reverb; all on a mobile
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    13 Sep 2005 12:33 UTC, Swelter Weight typed:
    > I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    > on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?

    I apply a bit to both.

    Make sure both surfaces are smoothe and clean. Don't use too much compund.

    --
    Email: Martin Fenelon <fenm at freeuk dot com>
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Swelter Weight" <drok@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:lGzVe.12743$x43.2393495@twister.nyc.rr.com...
    > I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    > on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?

    I apply a little to the heatsink roughly where it will contact the CPU,
    smear it around, then wipe it off. This helps fill in any imperfections on
    the bottom of the sink. Then I apply it to the CPU. I put an amount about
    equal to a grain of rice and use a small, flat plastic spatula* to spread it
    evenly. Temps are generally in the mid 30's.

    * I have an old, flat laptop tool that's about 1/8" across that I use to
    spread the goo.

    The real trick is to install the heatsink as close to square as possible, so
    there's no sliding around while you try to get the clips in place. Temps
    will drop over the first 24-48 hours as the paste cures.


    Bill G
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Swelter Weight" <drok@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:lGzVe.12743$x43.2393495@twister.nyc.rr.com...
    > I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    > on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >

    If you were to put grease on your HSF, where exactly on the HSF would you
    put it? The apparent center? And what length should you apply? Putting
    grease on the CPU means that the grease is going exactly where it's supposed
    to, in the quantity necessary, regardless of what the heatsink's footprint
    looks like. This is also the method recommended by Arctic Silver.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Kevin wrote:
    > "Swelter Weight" <drok@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:lGzVe.12743$x43.2393495@twister.nyc.rr.com...
    >
    >>I've read that some people put it directly on the CPU, while others put it
    >>on the bottom of the heatsink. Is one method better than the other?
    >>
    >>Thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > If you were to put grease on your HSF, where exactly on the HSF would you
    > put it? The apparent center? And what length should you apply? Putting
    > grease on the CPU means that the grease is going exactly where it's supposed
    > to, in the quantity necessary, regardless of what the heatsink's footprint
    > looks like. This is also the method recommended by Arctic Silver.
    >
    >

    i put it on the HS (Vanessa L-type), as its complete base (heatpipe)
    touches the CPU. Otherwise I would recommend applying it to the CPU instead.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    A metal surface is covered in microscopic voids & lands.
    o Voids contain air - which is a poor thermal conductor
    o Heatsink compound is a poor thermal conductor - but better than air

    Hence you only need enough heatsink compound to fill the voids.
    o Excess thermal compound increases the thermal resistance
    o Eventually the excess will squish out from between the heatsink & die
    o However it may not do so symmetrically resulting in hot spots

    Any good compound will do, but artic silver may provide a small
    benefit in some marginal hot-spot applications over conventional.

    A finger with clingfilm makes a good spreader, but the ideal is a piece
    of flat edged plastic which can create a thin but uniform thickness film.

    As a rule heatsink compound does not flow particularly well, so at the
    very thin & ideal thin film layer you can get hot spots resulting. When
    you remove the heatsink you can find near dry or weak contact areas.

    Plain heatsink compound is cheap enough to not use improvisation :-)
    --
    Dorothy Bradbury
    www.dorothybradbury.co.uk for quiet NMB & Panaflo fans
  10. http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

    A little tip also.
    Apply it to the cpu like it says in the link and also put some on the heatsink and work it in like the other guy said with scran wrap and then Wipe it off.
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