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Thermalright SLK-948U Glue Problem

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  • Heatsinks
  • Thermalright
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 20, 2004 10:54:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Anyone have any tips on removing the glue residue from the
"protective" plastic cover on the Thermalright SLK-948U heatsink ?

I hit the thing with 91% iso alcohol and then Xylene. Still see some
glazed residue pattern on the surface. They should paint the space
shuttle with this stuff.

Got to hand it to Thermalright. Charge $43 for a heatsink and then
give customers heavy machine tool markings, no mirror finish at all,
and for some reason think this all needs protection. Then protect it
with a stick on plastic cover that leaves a sticky residue that's a
thermal barrier and remarkably unremovable.

Great design, piss poor execution.

My Iceburq VGA cooler came with a clean mirror finish and no "cover"
for $16.

More about : thermalright slk 948u glue problem

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 20, 2004 4:22:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Try GooGone then clean up with acetone followed by 95%+ denatured alky.
--
Tally Ho!
Ed Forsythe
Maryland, USA


<vaguely_annoyed@wasted_time.com> wrote in message
news:mn9a809l30v1rqe872egbn4nn56hl3fmci@4ax.com...
>
> Anyone have any tips on removing the glue residue from the
> "protective" plastic cover on the Thermalright SLK-948U heatsink ?
>
> I hit the thing with 91% iso alcohol and then Xylene. Still see some
> glazed residue pattern on the surface. They should paint the space
> shuttle with this stuff.
>
> Got to hand it to Thermalright. Charge $43 for a heatsink and then
> give customers heavy machine tool markings, no mirror finish at all,
> and for some reason think this all needs protection. Then protect it
> with a stick on plastic cover that leaves a sticky residue that's a
> thermal barrier and remarkably unremovable.
>
> Great design, piss poor execution.
>
> My Iceburq VGA cooler came with a clean mirror finish and no "cover"
> for $16.
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 20, 2004 7:14:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 06:54:07 -0700, vaguely_annoyed@wasted_time.com <vaguely_annoyed@wasted_time.com> wrote:
>
> Anyone have any tips on removing the glue residue from the
> "protective" plastic cover on the Thermalright SLK-948U heatsink ?
>
> I hit the thing with 91% iso alcohol and then Xylene. Still see some
> glazed residue pattern on the surface. They should paint the space
> shuttle with this stuff.
>
> Got to hand it to Thermalright. Charge $43 for a heatsink and then
> give customers heavy machine tool markings, no mirror finish at all,
> and for some reason think this all needs protection. Then protect it
> with a stick on plastic cover that leaves a sticky residue that's a
> thermal barrier and remarkably unremovable.
>
> Great design, piss poor execution.
>
> My Iceburq VGA cooler came with a clean mirror finish and no "cover"
> for $16.
>
Use a light turpentine to get the glue stuff off and then wipe down the
area with alcohol.

Larry Gagnon, A+ certified tech.



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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 21, 2004 7:26:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

vaguely_annoyed@wasted_time.com wrote:
> Anyone have any tips on removing the glue residue from the
> "protective" plastic cover on the Thermalright SLK-948U heatsink ?
>
> I hit the thing with 91% iso alcohol and then Xylene. Still see some
> glazed residue pattern on the surface. They should paint the space
> shuttle with this stuff.

If xylene doesn't take it off (assuming you have the good stuff which will
happily dissolve things like toothbrushes and most "protective" gloves), I'm
at a loss as to what would besides fluorine. You sure it isn't surface
damage rather than a residue?

[...]

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 21, 2004 7:26:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 03:26:17 +1200, "Michael Brown"
<see@signature.below> wrote:

>vaguely_annoyed@wasted_time.com wrote:
>> Anyone have any tips on removing the glue residue from the
>> "protective" plastic cover on the Thermalright SLK-948U heatsink ?
>>
>> I hit the thing with 91% iso alcohol and then Xylene. Still see some
>> glazed residue pattern on the surface. They should paint the space
>> shuttle with this stuff.
>
>If xylene doesn't take it off (assuming you have the good stuff which will
>happily dissolve things like toothbrushes and most "protective" gloves), I'm
>at a loss as to what would besides fluorine. You sure it isn't surface
>damage rather than a residue?
>


I was starting to think it was, until it started to come off ;) 

Day 2, I hit it with spray carburetor cleaner and an alcohol wash.

Nada.

I took another poster's suggestion and tried the only thing left
around here, some old turpentine. I hit it with that and after some
scrubbing, the crackled glaze surface finish starts to look a little
cloudy and fuzzy. At this point I get a new scotchbrite
(green/yellow) sponge pad and go to town with the turpentine and the
green scouring side. Crackled glaze and goo lines are GONE. Now have
typical surface scratches from scouring pad, but I think they're an
improvement over the tooling marks. Hosed it down with carbonator
cleaner and alcohol but still had green scouring pad fuzz in the fins.
Hosed the whole heatsink good in my bathroom sink with water and blew
dry with a hair dryer. Damn that copper heatsink gets HOT.

Both the xylene and the turpentine did a number on latex exam gloves,
if you've got the green chemical gloves, get them out.

I feel sorry for people who don't get all this stuff off. I've
nearsighted, and can get real close with a little 10x inspection lens.
I was tempted to declare it clean (laziness) after some cleaning with
alcohol, but on close inspection with strong light, there was some
tough junk there that finally did come off.

At this point, I'm tempted to learn how to lap the surface just to
finish the job right, but since the cpu has a heat spreader now, it
probably wouldn't help much for the time spent.

Here's Thermalright's suggestions from their website:


How to remove glue residue on heat sink base

Some of our users had recently report glue residue on the base of
their newly purchased HSF after removal of protective film. We are
working with our factory to see if there is a feasible alternative
that is readily to adapt. In the mean time, we suggest these steps for
customers with glue residue problem to remove these sticky unsightly
performance hurdle, and realize the true performance potential of our
HSF.

* The glue from the protective film is a thermal insulator, which
would keep thermal energy from working CPU right on top of CPU die
For removal of these glue, you need:

Petroleum based solvent or acetone
(automotive carburetor cleaner, paint thinner, nail polish remover,
etc.)
1 pair of rubber gloves
1 clean soft rag

Please keep away from heat source and always work in a well ventilated
area.

1.peel off the protective film.
2.put the rubber gloves on, take the soft rag and put a little amount
of acetone on the cloth.
3.gently wipe the HSF base with rag, let the base dry for 10~15 sec.
visually inspect the surface for any more residue.
4.repeat the steps 2 and 3 if necessary.
5.take the gloves off and inspect HSF base surface under a light
source, double check to see if the residue is totally removed with
different angle.
6.apply a thin layer thermal paste evenly, and proceed to HSF
installation.
!