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Dell Dimension/Celeron 2.4

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April 28, 2004 11:15:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

G'day,
I got a Dell Dimension 2400 (Celeron 2.4)
*No, I didn't pay for it, it was a gift*

However, this is what Dell Says about it:

Intel Celeron 2.4Ghz Processor
128KB ON-DIE L2 Cache
This Processor has a 400Mhz Front Side Bus

256MB 333Mhz DDR (Memory performs at 266Mhz with a 400Mhz Front Side Bus)

Does anyone know if there a way I can get the Memory to perform at 333Mhz on
this shitty Mobo?

Or do I have to gut this machine and rob it for all its parts and buy a new
motherboard?

Cheers,

Andy

More about : dell dimension celeron

April 28, 2004 11:15:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

> Or do I have to gut this machine and rob it for all its parts and buy a
new
> motherboard?
>
> Cheers,

You can't adjust the FSB....on most Dell's I've seen the memory is
autodetected and the memory bus speed is autoset. The memory on this box is
shared with the video adapter. The FSB is a quad pumped 100Mhz. As for
pulling useful parts, there are none. The $80 Celeron processor performs on
a level with a 1.6Ghz P4 Willamette. Everything else is proprietary soldered
on motherboard stuff. The power supply pumps out a screaming 160W and is
proprietary also. For web browsing or productivity apps it's OK. For gaming
it's a dead loss.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
April 28, 2004 11:15:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Andy wrote:
> G'day,
> I got a Dell Dimension 2400 (Celeron 2.4)
> *No, I didn't pay for it, it was a gift*
>
> However, this is what Dell Says about it:
>
> Intel Celeron 2.4Ghz Processor
> 128KB ON-DIE L2 Cache
> This Processor has a 400Mhz Front Side Bus
>
> 256MB 333Mhz DDR (Memory performs at 266Mhz with a 400Mhz Front Side Bus)
>
> Does anyone know if there a way I can get the Memory to perform at 333Mhz on
> this shitty Mobo?

The short answer is no.

For a little background, though, Dell model numbers denote more a 'class'
of machine (for a market segment. In this case "value PC") rather than a
specific one. Your "Dell Dimension 2400", for example, is available with
celeron processors from 2 to 2.7 GHz (400MHz FSB) and P4s from 2.2 (400MHz
FSB) to 3.06 (533 MHz FSB). You need their "Service Tag Number" to know
exactly what you've got.

The good news is that you could probably put a 3.0g Gig P4 in it as Dell's
"Technical Specifications" for the "Dell™ Dimension™ 2400 Series" says
that's an Intel 845GV chipset and supports a 533 MHz FSB, and
hyperthreading, but you'd need to check what really IS in your system
because it's possible for them to use different motherboards (just like
they do with processors).

As a general rule, store bought machines are intended to be run as they are
designed and don't provide 'overclock' features for you to run them OTHER
than as designed. So, for the memory, the thing is, with a maximum system
clock of 133Mhz that's the maximum clock for the memory. I.E. DDR: 133 x2=
266MHz. You also wouldn't gain much, if anything, by running it 'faster'
since the FSB (for your Celeron) is 400MHz. I.E. You can't pump data
through the FSB any faster than that so getting it 'faster' from memory TO
the FSB doesn't get it into the processor any faster. Although there might
be some benefits to simultaneous AGP, PCI, and processor memory access but
it's a moot point as there isn't a clock available to run it any faster.

If you're the adventurous type, and technically inclined, you could try
wire tricks (jumpering CPU pins) to force the celeron into requesting a
533MHz FSB, and a higher core voltage, but there's no guarantee it'll hit
3.2 Gig.

>
> Or do I have to gut this machine and rob it for all its parts and buy anew
> motherboard?


It's a "value PC" with everything integrated into the motherboard. In
effect, there isn't anything you can 'rob'.
Related resources
May 12, 2004 6:57:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

could get real adventurous and contact award bios for a new bios chip to
allow oC also.
always been to afraid to try that on my dell 4500


"David Maynard" <dmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
news:1090h8o3m04jp26@corp.supernews.com...
Andy wrote:
> G'day,
> I got a Dell Dimension 2400 (Celeron 2.4)
> *No, I didn't pay for it, it was a gift*
>
> However, this is what Dell Says about it:
>
> Intel Celeron 2.4Ghz Processor
> 128KB ON-DIE L2 Cache
> This Processor has a 400Mhz Front Side Bus
>
> 256MB 333Mhz DDR (Memory performs at 266Mhz with a 400Mhz Front Side Bus)
>
> Does anyone know if there a way I can get the Memory to perform at 333Mhz
on
> this shitty Mobo?

The short answer is no.

For a little background, though, Dell model numbers denote more a 'class'
of machine (for a market segment. In this case "value PC") rather than a
specific one. Your "Dell Dimension 2400", for example, is available with
celeron processors from 2 to 2.7 GHz (400MHz FSB) and P4s from 2.2 (400MHz
FSB) to 3.06 (533 MHz FSB). You need their "Service Tag Number" to know
exactly what you've got.

The good news is that you could probably put a 3.0g Gig P4 in it as Dell's
"Technical Specifications" for the "Dell™ Dimension™ 2400 Series" says
that's an Intel 845GV chipset and supports a 533 MHz FSB, and
hyperthreading, but you'd need to check what really IS in your system
because it's possible for them to use different motherboards (just like
they do with processors).

As a general rule, store bought machines are intended to be run as they are
designed and don't provide 'overclock' features for you to run them OTHER
than as designed. So, for the memory, the thing is, with a maximum system
clock of 133Mhz that's the maximum clock for the memory. I.E. DDR: 133 x2=
266MHz. You also wouldn't gain much, if anything, by running it 'faster'
since the FSB (for your Celeron) is 400MHz. I.E. You can't pump data
through the FSB any faster than that so getting it 'faster' from memory TO
the FSB doesn't get it into the processor any faster. Although there might
be some benefits to simultaneous AGP, PCI, and processor memory access but
it's a moot point as there isn't a clock available to run it any faster.

If you're the adventurous type, and technically inclined, you could try
wire tricks (jumpering CPU pins) to force the celeron into requesting a
533MHz FSB, and a higher core voltage, but there's no guarantee it'll hit
3.2 Gig.

>
> Or do I have to gut this machine and rob it for all its parts and buy anew
> motherboard?


It's a "value PC" with everything integrated into the motherboard. In
effect, there isn't anything you can 'rob'.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
May 13, 2004 7:54:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

dmac wrote:
> could get real adventurous and contact award bios for a new bios chip to
> allow oC also.
> always been to afraid to try that on my dell 4500

A new BIOS won't make the hardware suddenly capable of things it can't do.

BTW, Award licenses the core code and development tools for a developer to
then create motherboard specific BIOSes for their products but 'they',
Award, don't have motherboard specific BIOSes to sell you.


> "David Maynard" <dmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
> news:1090h8o3m04jp26@corp.supernews.com...
> Andy wrote:
>
>>G'day,
>>I got a Dell Dimension 2400 (Celeron 2.4)
>>*No, I didn't pay for it, it was a gift*
>>
>>However, this is what Dell Says about it:
>>
>>Intel Celeron 2.4Ghz Processor
>>128KB ON-DIE L2 Cache
>>This Processor has a 400Mhz Front Side Bus
>>
>>256MB 333Mhz DDR (Memory performs at 266Mhz with a 400Mhz Front Side Bus)
>>
>>Does anyone know if there a way I can get the Memory to perform at 333Mhz
>
> on
>
>>this shitty Mobo?
>
>
> The short answer is no.
>
> For a little background, though, Dell model numbers denote more a 'class'
> of machine (for a market segment. In this case "value PC") rather than a
> specific one. Your "Dell Dimension 2400", for example, is available with
> celeron processors from 2 to 2.7 GHz (400MHz FSB) and P4s from 2.2 (400MHz
> FSB) to 3.06 (533 MHz FSB). You need their "Service Tag Number" to know
> exactly what you've got.
>
> The good news is that you could probably put a 3.0g Gig P4 in it as Dell's
> "Technical Specifications" for the "Dell™ Dimension™ 2400 Series" says
> that's an Intel 845GV chipset and supports a 533 MHz FSB, and
> hyperthreading, but you'd need to check what really IS in your system
> because it's possible for them to use different motherboards (just like
> they do with processors).
>
> As a general rule, store bought machines are intended to be run as they are
> designed and don't provide 'overclock' features for you to run them OTHER
> than as designed. So, for the memory, the thing is, with a maximum system
> clock of 133Mhz that's the maximum clock for the memory. I.E. DDR: 133 x2=
> 266MHz. You also wouldn't gain much, if anything, by running it 'faster'
> since the FSB (for your Celeron) is 400MHz. I.E. You can't pump data
> through the FSB any faster than that so getting it 'faster' from memory TO
> the FSB doesn't get it into the processor any faster. Although there might
> be some benefits to simultaneous AGP, PCI, and processor memory access but
> it's a moot point as there isn't a clock available to run it any faster.
>
> If you're the adventurous type, and technically inclined, you could try
> wire tricks (jumpering CPU pins) to force the celeron into requesting a
> 533MHz FSB, and a higher core voltage, but there's no guarantee it'll hit
> 3.2 Gig.
>
>
>>Or do I have to gut this machine and rob it for all its parts and buy anew
>>motherboard?
>
>
>
> It's a "value PC" with everything integrated into the motherboard. In
> effect, there isn't anything you can 'rob'.
>
>
>
>
>
!