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Where Are The Temperature Sensors On The MB

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  • Hardware
  • Temperature
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 14, 2004 3:27:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Hi Folks

Some guidance please, I've a rather obscure MB an Ibase
I815E(www.ibase-europe.com/pdf/manual/etx/et815.pdf), which uses the IT8712 for
hardware monitoring.

I want to log the temperatures using Motherboard Monitor but need to "proove"
that the temperatures being recorded are actually those being displayed. I
intended to do this by spraying the localised area with chilled compressed air
and confirming the displayed temperature dropped and this mthod has worked fine
for the CPU.

However it looks like this MB has 2 temperature sensors, where are they located,
is there anything I should look out for?

I can find the IT8712 but if I cool that both MB temperatures drop.


Any suggestions much appreciated.

Terry

More about : temperature sensors

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 14, 2004 8:26:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Cool a small area of the motherboard at a time, and check for changes in
the temperature readings. You should be able to quickly zero in on the
location of the thermistor. There may be a printed lable on the motherboard
at the thermistor location, something like 'TH 1'.

There is a special coolant in a spray can with a long thin tube used for
diagnosing electronic heat problems ('Freezedown' is one brand name) that
works much better than compressed air and that can produce temperatures
down to about - 40).

--
Phil Weldon, pweldonatmindjumpdotcom
For communication,
replace "at" with the 'at sign'
replace "mindjump" with "mindspring."
replace "dot" with "."

"Terry Pin" <Terry_member@newsguy.com> wrote in message
news:cd2jos030ma@drn.newsguy.com...
> Hi Folks
>
> Some guidance please, I've a rather obscure MB an Ibase
> I815E(www.ibase-europe.com/pdf/manual/etx/et815.pdf), which uses the
IT8712 for
> hardware monitoring.
>
> I want to log the temperatures using Motherboard Monitor but need to
"proove"
> that the temperatures being recorded are actually those being displayed. I
> intended to do this by spraying the localised area with chilled compressed
air
> and confirming the displayed temperature dropped and this mthod has worked
fine
> for the CPU.
>
> However it looks like this MB has 2 temperature sensors, where are they
located,
> is there anything I should look out for?
>
> I can find the IT8712 but if I cool that both MB temperatures drop.
>
>
> Any suggestions much appreciated.
>
> Terry
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 15, 2004 9:37:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Phil Weldon wrote:
[...]
> There is a special coolant in a spray can with a long thin tube
> used for diagnosing electronic heat problems ('Freezedown' is one
> brand name) that works much better than compressed air and that can
> produce temperatures down to about - 40).

Drifting off topic a little, but if you want really, really cold
temperatures, use a compressed air can upside down. The fluid that comes out
is liquid nitrogen (about -190 deg C). Of course, I STRONLGY recommend you
don't use this on any component in your computer, and definately wear eye
protection if you do use it.

[...]
--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 15, 2004 9:43:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Michael Brown wrote:
> Phil Weldon wrote:
> [...]
>> There is a special coolant in a spray can with a long thin tube
>> used for diagnosing electronic heat problems ('Freezedown' is one
>> brand name) that works much better than compressed air and that can
>> produce temperatures down to about - 40).
>
> Drifting off topic a little, but if you want really, really cold
> temperatures, use a compressed air can upside down. The fluid that
> comes out is liquid nitrogen (about -190 deg C).

Gnah, brainfart. It's actually a freon-like substance, I'm not exactly sure
of it's boiling point.

> Of course, I
> STRONLGY recommend you don't use this on any component in your
> computer, and definately wear eye protection if you do use it.

This was from experience ... seeing droplets of damn cold stuff flying
around makes me nervous :) 

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
July 15, 2004 9:59:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Michael Brown wrote:
> Michael Brown wrote:
>> Phil Weldon wrote:
>> [...]
>>> There is a special coolant in a spray can with a long thin tube
>>> used for diagnosing electronic heat problems ('Freezedown' is one
>>> brand name) that works much better than compressed air and that can
>>> produce temperatures down to about - 40).
>>
>> Drifting off topic a little, but if you want really, really cold
>> temperatures, use a compressed air can upside down. The fluid that
>> comes out is liquid nitrogen (about -190 deg C).
>
> Gnah, brainfart. It's actually a freon-like substance, I'm not
> exactly sure of it's boiling point.

After a bit of googling (which I should have done BEFORE I started posting
....) it looks like it's probably (Freon) R134A, which has a boiling point of
about -25 deg C and standard pressure. So not quite as good as those
"freeze" sprays, but still a whole lot of fun (shatter plants, blow up drink
bottles, etc etc).

[...]

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open