Cooling a P4 Prescott

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)

It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.

I obviously need to cool it down a lot so I'm looking for the best air
cooler. I just can't afford water cooling at the moment.

I'm also planning to install some extra fans in the case to get the hot
air out. Just now it's sitting at 40C in the case.

I've read some info at www.overclockers.com and other sites and have
gotten down to three possible coolers.

The Thermalright XP-90 (http://tinyurl.com/4lv4m) what are the benefits
of using 'heat pipe' technology?

The Thermalright TOWER112 (http://tinyurl.com/4tmtu).

Or the ZALMAN CNPS7000A (http://tinyurl.com/2nacv).

Does anyone have any recomendations about these or any others I should
consider?

What about web sites that can give me some more info and help me find a
solution to getting this system cool?


And unfortunately, nitro cooling isn't an option either just now... :-(


--
Alex Devlin

"I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you have
to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
6 answers Last reply
More about cooling prescott
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    >
    > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working
    > hard.

    Is this at default speed, overclocked, with the standard Intel heatsink,
    with something else?

    > I'm also planning to install some extra fans in the case to get the
    > hot air out. Just now it's sitting at 40C in the case.

    That's way too hot. If you pay attention to this aspect before splashing out
    on a new heatsink, you will find that your existing thermal solution,
    whatever it is, will work far more effectively, as will whatever you buy to
    replace it - if indeed you still need a replacement.

    > what are the benefits of using 'heat pipe' technology?

    Put very simply, heat pipes are a method of "pumping" heat away from its
    source to the cooling portion of the heatsink via a phase change (liquid to
    vapour and back to liquid) process. The sealed pipes contain a fluid that
    evaporates at the base of the sink due to heat from the CPU. It then rises
    to the top of the pipe, carrying the heat with it, and gradually condensing
    back to liquid as it goes, thus trickling back to the bottom of the heatsink
    where the process starts again.

    One of the points to make about heat pipe heatsinks is that they are
    normally designed to work best on a horizontally mounted motherboard, and
    their effectiveness is often compromised when mounted sideways in a tower
    case.

    > The Thermalright TOWER112 (http://tinyurl.com/4tmtu).

    This is made by Thermaltake, not Thermalright, and is also a heat pipe
    heatsink, and works very well. Probably worth pointing out though that the
    CoolerMaster Hyper 6 is a very similar design, but benefits from a better
    fitting kit and a better standard of finish to its CPU mating face. If
    you're prepared to do a little work, the Thermaltake product works just as
    well as the CoolerMaster. Out of the box though the CM product is a little
    better.

    One thing to point out about both these designs is that they are both
    physically very large and very heavy. If you're going to mount in a tower
    system, you really need to bolt their mounts through to the case via
    standoffs to take the stress off the motherboard.

    > Or the ZALMAN CNPS7000A (http://tinyurl.com/2nacv).

    This is a good, quiet heatsink, but isn't as effective as the heatpipe
    designs mentioned above.

    > Does anyone have any recomendations about these or any others I
    > should consider?

    In terms of sheer effectiveness, multi-heatpipe sinks like the Thermaltake
    Tower and CoolerMaster Hyper 6 are about the state of the art at this time,
    but their mounting requirements should make you think carefully - ideally
    they need to be used on a horizontally mounted motherboard, both for maximum
    effectiveness and the mechanical integrity of the motherboard. No personal
    experience of the Thermalright product you mention, but as a smaller, four
    pipe design it is unlikely to be quite as effective. On the plus side though
    it is smaller and lighter and so should be easier to mount.

    Before you buy anything though you should sort out your case cooling. As
    things stand, any money spent on a new CPU heatsink will be largely wasted
    due to the fact that its effectiveness will be severely compromised. Forced
    air heat exchangers rely on the temperature differential between hot and
    coldside, and a more effective CPU sink will likely make the air in your
    case even hotter. You need to get your in-case temps down before making any
    other moves.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Get the most out of your digital photos www.dabsxpose.com
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    >
    > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.
    Ahh, am I the only one who knows this??
    That temp is just fine for a "Prescott"
    Prescott's have a much hotter overheat temp then most CPU's
    93ºC I think, it's not uncommon to see temps hit 73ºC with
    a Prescott.
    Every1 that has posted a reply, go do your home work.
    You'll find it's true.

    RavingRaichu. ;-) :-) (Denny, always with a
    smile, even if times are bad.)

    >
    > I obviously need to cool it down a lot so I'm looking for the best air
    > cooler. I just can't afford water cooling at the moment.
    >
    > I'm also planning to install some extra fans in the case to get the hot
    > air out. Just now it's sitting at 40C in the case.
    >
    > I've read some info at www.overclockers.com and other sites and have
    > gotten down to three possible coolers.
    >
    > The Thermalright XP-90 (http://tinyurl.com/4lv4m) what are the benefits
    > of using 'heat pipe' technology?
    >
    > The Thermalright TOWER112 (http://tinyurl.com/4tmtu).
    >
    > Or the ZALMAN CNPS7000A (http://tinyurl.com/2nacv).
    >
    > Does anyone have any recomendations about these or any others I should
    > consider?
    >
    > What about web sites that can give me some more info and help me find a
    > solution to getting this system cool?
    >
    >
    > And unfortunately, nitro cooling isn't an option either just now... :-(
    >
    >
    > --
    > Alex Devlin
    >
    > "I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you have
    > to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    news:41829d6d$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
    >
    > "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    > news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    > > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    > >
    > > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.
    > Ahh, am I the only one who knows this??
    > That temp is just fine for a "Prescott"
    > Prescott's have a much hotter overheat temp then most CPU's
    > 93ºC I think, it's not uncommon to see temps hit 73ºC with
    > a Prescott.
    I need to correct myself here, 93ºC is when the cpu goes to glass..
    burns out, toast.
    Again though, the Prescott is one of the hottest cpu's on the market,
    and I don't meat hot as in good.
    I mean it runs hotter then anyother cpu I've seem, it's also why I don't
    have
    one in my Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro board.
    Trying to keep one of those things cool is a loosing battle as long as you
    don't go to water.
    http://www.bit-tech.net/review/303/3
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20040212193648.html
    89 Watts is a lot of power for just one CPU
    It's not far from 90 watts.
    Grab an 80 watt light bulb that's been on for a while.
    You need to get rid of that much heat to keep it cool.
    And then some.
    I read one page that listed the Prescott burning up at like 65ºC
    Some ppl's Prescott's run at that idle.
    And 70 or so under load, if that pages was right, there would be a lot of
    Prescott cpu's that would be pieces of glass.
    It's also on Intel's pages too, but I cant seem to find it right now.
    They should make it easier to find,, Grrrrrr.
    The 3.2 & 3.4 GHz Prescott's use 103W
    Try to keep that cool.
    You should've just got a (Northwood)
    Northwoods run cool, my system is almost idle..
    I'd say even without a monitor, which I have none installed.
    my cpu is running at a temp of about 72 or 73 ºF
    if any warmer, 74 or 75F I'm not sure what C would be.

    <Snip,, copy paste.>


    RavingRaichu. ;-) :-) (Denny, always with a
    smile, even if times are bad.)
    > "I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you have
    > to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Hi,

    I have a P4 Prescott 3.4 ghz (560) sockel 775. My CPU was also very hot, so
    i put a Watercoolin-System on it, and now i have temperatures about 28 - 30
    C. My Northbridge and GPU is also Watercooled. My CPU is running at 4.2 Ghz.

    Greez alex


    "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:4182f390$1_3@alt.athenanews.com...
    > "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    > news:41829d6d$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
    >>
    >> "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    >> news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    >> > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    >> >
    >> > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.
    >> Ahh, am I the only one who knows this??
    >> That temp is just fine for a "Prescott"
    >> Prescott's have a much hotter overheat temp then most CPU's
    >> 93ºC I think, it's not uncommon to see temps hit 73ºC with
    >> a Prescott.
    > I need to correct myself here, 93ºC is when the cpu goes to glass..
    > burns out, toast.
    > Again though, the Prescott is one of the hottest cpu's on the market,
    > and I don't meat hot as in good.
    > I mean it runs hotter then anyother cpu I've seem, it's also why I don't
    > have
    > one in my Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro board.
    > Trying to keep one of those things cool is a loosing battle as long as you
    > don't go to water.
    > http://www.bit-tech.net/review/303/3
    > http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20040212193648.html
    > 89 Watts is a lot of power for just one CPU
    > It's not far from 90 watts.
    > Grab an 80 watt light bulb that's been on for a while.
    > You need to get rid of that much heat to keep it cool.
    > And then some.
    > I read one page that listed the Prescott burning up at like 65ºC
    > Some ppl's Prescott's run at that idle.
    > And 70 or so under load, if that pages was right, there would be a lot of
    > Prescott cpu's that would be pieces of glass.
    > It's also on Intel's pages too, but I cant seem to find it right now.
    > They should make it easier to find,, Grrrrrr.
    > The 3.2 & 3.4 GHz Prescott's use 103W
    > Try to keep that cool.
    > You should've just got a (Northwood)
    > Northwoods run cool, my system is almost idle..
    > I'd say even without a monitor, which I have none installed.
    > my cpu is running at a temp of about 72 or 73 ºF
    > if any warmer, 74 or 75F I'm not sure what C would be.
    >
    > <Snip,, copy paste.>
    >
    >
    >
    > RavingRaichu. ;-) :-) (Denny, always with a
    > smile, even if times are bad.)
    >> "I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you have
    >> to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Hi,

    I have a P4 Prescott 3.4 ghz (560) sockel 775. My CPU was also very hot, so
    i put a Watercoolin-System on it, and now i have temperatures about 28 - 30
    C. My Northbridge and GPU is also Watercooled. My CPU is running at 4.2 Ghz.

    Greez alex


    "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:4182f390$1_3@alt.athenanews.com...
    > "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    > news:41829d6d$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
    >>
    >> "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    >> news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    >> > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    >> >
    >> > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.
    >> Ahh, am I the only one who knows this??
    >> That temp is just fine for a "Prescott"
    >> Prescott's have a much hotter overheat temp then most CPU's
    >> 93ºC I think, it's not uncommon to see temps hit 73ºC with
    >> a Prescott.
    > I need to correct myself here, 93ºC is when the cpu goes to glass..
    > burns out, toast.
    > Again though, the Prescott is one of the hottest cpu's on the market,
    > and I don't meat hot as in good.
    > I mean it runs hotter then anyother cpu I've seem, it's also why I don't
    > have
    > one in my Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro board.
    > Trying to keep one of those things cool is a loosing battle as long as you
    > don't go to water.
    > http://www.bit-tech.net/review/303/3
    > http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20040212193648.html
    > 89 Watts is a lot of power for just one CPU
    > It's not far from 90 watts.
    > Grab an 80 watt light bulb that's been on for a while.
    > You need to get rid of that much heat to keep it cool.
    > And then some.
    > I read one page that listed the Prescott burning up at like 65ºC
    > Some ppl's Prescott's run at that idle.
    > And 70 or so under load, if that pages was right, there would be a lot of
    > Prescott cpu's that would be pieces of glass.
    > It's also on Intel's pages too, but I cant seem to find it right now.
    > They should make it easier to find,, Grrrrrr.
    > The 3.2 & 3.4 GHz Prescott's use 103W
    > Try to keep that cool.
    > You should've just got a (Northwood)
    > Northwoods run cool, my system is almost idle..
    > I'd say even without a monitor, which I have none installed.
    > my cpu is running at a temp of about 72 or 73 ºF
    > if any warmer, 74 or 75F I'm not sure what C would be.
    >
    > <Snip,, copy paste.>
    >
    >
    >
    > RavingRaichu. ;-) :-) (Denny, always with a
    > smile, even if times are bad.)
    >> "I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you have
    >> to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    "Alexander Ferrari" <aferrari@bluewin.ch> wrote in message
    news:41880745_2@news.bluewin.ch...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a P4 Prescott 3.4 ghz (560) sockel 775. My CPU was also very hot,
    so
    > i put a Watercoolin-System on it, and now i have temperatures about 28 -
    30
    > C. My Northbridge and GPU is also Watercooled. My CPU is running at 4.2
    Ghz.
    You didn't need to post it more then one time.
    The problem with a 775 Prescott is the fact that you can't use any of it's
    64Bit instruction set, @ least not till Microsoft comes out with the Intel
    Version of WinXp 64
    It could be as late as january till they come out with it.
    This board I use, a socket 478 board can take a Prescott, it's ready with
    the bios for it..
    Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro, but cause of how hot they get, I don't want one.
    Plus, if it's not as ready as Gigabyte thinks it is, it can go really hard
    on
    some of the parts of the MB, read it a number of times.

    Here's something that the guy with a 2.8 GHz Prescott should read.
    http://www.hardcoreware.net/reviews/review-208-1.htm

    "In our first Prescott review, we told you that it was significantly hotter
    than an equivalent Northwood CPU at 3.2 GHz. It was not unusual to see a
    fully loaded Prescott to hit up to 80 degrees C (yes, CELSIUS) with stock
    cooling. This poses no stability issues however.

    Interestingly, the new 3.4 GHz Prescott features the exact same Thermal
    Design Power spec as the 3.2, and thus should be no hotter or cooler than
    the 3.2 GHz version."

    You can also look up my board from that link, I didn't remember that G --
    Gigabyte GA-8IG1000 Pro-G But that is the board I have.

    A little over 73ºC is normal for your (2.8GHz Prescott)
    Me hopes the one who started this thread reads this.

    RavingRaichu. ;-) :-)

    >
    > Greez alex
    >
    >
    > "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    > news:4182f390$1_3@alt.athenanews.com...
    > > "RavingRaichu" <ravingraichu@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    > > news:41829d6d$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
    > >>
    > >> "Alex Devlin" <Alex@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    > >> news:mxEed.60422$hj.39791@fed1read07...
    > >> > My 2.8 P4 is running way to hot. (So what's new?)
    > >> >
    > >> > It idles around 48C but goes to 73C+ when working hard.
    > >> Ahh, am I the only one who knows this??
    > >> That temp is just fine for a "Prescott"
    > >> Prescott's have a much hotter overheat temp then most CPU's
    > >> 93ºC I think, it's not uncommon to see temps hit 73ºC with
    > >> a Prescott.
    > > I need to correct myself here, 93ºC is when the cpu goes to glass..
    > > burns out, toast.
    > > Again though, the Prescott is one of the hottest cpu's on the market,
    > > and I don't meat hot as in good.
    > > I mean it runs hotter then anyother cpu I've seem, it's also why I don't
    > > have
    > > one in my Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro board.
    > > Trying to keep one of those things cool is a loosing battle as long as
    you
    > > don't go to water.
    > > http://www.bit-tech.net/review/303/3
    > > http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20040212193648.html
    > > 89 Watts is a lot of power for just one CPU
    > > It's not far from 90 watts.
    > > Grab an 80 watt light bulb that's been on for a while.
    > > You need to get rid of that much heat to keep it cool.
    > > And then some.
    > > I read one page that listed the Prescott burning up at like 65ºC
    > > Some ppl's Prescott's run at that idle.
    > > And 70 or so under load, if that pages was right, there would be a lot
    of
    > > Prescott cpu's that would be pieces of glass.
    > > It's also on Intel's pages too, but I cant seem to find it right now.
    > > They should make it easier to find,, Grrrrrr.
    > > The 3.2 & 3.4 GHz Prescott's use 103W
    > > Try to keep that cool.
    > > You should've just got a (Northwood)
    > > Northwoods run cool, my system is almost idle..
    > > I'd say even without a monitor, which I have none installed.
    > > my cpu is running at a temp of about 72 or 73 ºF
    > > if any warmer, 74 or 75F I'm not sure what C would be.
    > >
    > > <Snip,, copy paste.>
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > RavingRaichu. ;-) :-) (Denny, always with a
    > > smile, even if times are bad.)
    > >> "I don't care who you want to speak to, how far you came or what you
    have
    > >> to offer. You CAN'T PARK HERE!"
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
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