Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durabl..

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
costs

Note that while I may want to print out web pages with illustrations
and other images, photo quality is not important as the other
requirements (have two Epsons already) as long as the images are
readable.

How well it prints on quality paper such as paper suitable for resumes
is also important.

I imagine that a 300 by 300 dpi printer (if available) would be a
decent choice. The ink ought to be cheap to produce (and therefore
buy). The heads shouldn't be clog-prone, even with 3rd party inks.
Of course, I doubt that anyone manufacturers even produce
multifunction units at that "low" resolution anymore. Also, I prefer
new since buying used has the potential to turn out to be a case of
purchasing someone else's problems.

Another concern is that a "low" res printer produced today would not
only be cheap but also be cheaply built.

I prefer printheads that are either replaceable or on the cartridge.

From what I have read so far, it sounds like nothing really matches my
criteria. Canon looked good until I read that "There are few good
free software drivers for Canon and Lexmark inkjets. Do not buy one
and expect success." http://www.linuxprinting.org/suggested.html


Also, from my understanding Postscript (and probably PCL) are unlikely
to be found in a inkjet in the price range I can consider (definitely
under $300, probably half that).

Also, must be available in the 48 continental states of the United
Nations of Texas

Thanks in advance.


Bill Haught
Extract tooth to reply.
Enron is a case of compassionate conservatism.
Republicans have *morale* clarity.
Reselect George Bush http://georgewbush.org/ Four more wars!!!
15 answers Last reply
More about inkjet printers meeting requirements durabl
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    In article <MdARc.2973$Ow6.280510@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    "Bill Haught" <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:

    > Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
    > Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    > interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
    > costs

    Boy, you want it all, don't you?

    In case you haven't noticed, the entire inkjet printer industry is based
    on the fact that these things are throw-away devices. They design them
    to fail, and expect them to fail, so as to keep people buying new ones
    out of the factory.

    So durability is determined: they're not. Period.

    Low ink costs? Canon, with refills. But they're not durable printers,
    so....nor, due to price pressure from the buying public, will any of
    them have anything even remotely resembling an on-board print processor.

    You need to move to color lasers to get on-board print processing, and
    even then many of the low-end models don't have that.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    "Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote in message
    news:elmop-902682.21371208082004@text.usenetserver.com...
    > In article <MdARc.2973$Ow6.280510@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    > "Bill Haught" <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:
    >
    > > Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements?
    Durable,
    > > Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    > > interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or
    cartridge
    > > costs
    >
    > Boy, you want it all, don't you?

    I've heard that sort of thing before in response to other questions
    posted to forums and newsgroups. Pretty much sums it up. Doesn't
    look realistic though.

    > In case you haven't noticed, the entire inkjet printer industry is
    based
    > on the fact that these things are throw-away devices. They design
    them
    > to fail, and expect them to fail, so as to keep people buying new
    ones
    > out of the factory.
    >
    > So durability is determined: they're not. Period.

    I have read that really cheap inkjet printers (I think the price
    mentioned was something like 20 or 30 dollars) tend to last about a
    month. By "durable" I mean in relative terms. Epsons (and even
    Canons) last longer than that. Of course, this may have been written
    before the "milk 'em with the consumables" marketing reached today's
    extremes (or perhaps they were referring to Lexmark?).

    > You need to move to color lasers to get on-board print processing,
    and
    > even then many of the low-end models don't have that.

    I figured that I'd be lucky to find a printer with 1) a motor at least
    no cheaper than a typical high res inkjets combined with 2) decent
    printheads that don't push the technology to the point of high ink
    costs and problems and 3) on-board processing. A strange request for
    sure. However, one model meeting the above requirements would do, so
    despite the apparent futility I decided to ask anyway in hopes of a
    pleasant surprise.


    Bill Haught
    Extract tooth to reply.
    Fan of oldamericancentury.org
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    "Elmo P. Shagnasty" (elmop@nastydesigns.com) writes:
    > In article <MdARc.2973$Ow6.280510@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    > "Bill Haught" <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
    >> Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    >> interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
    >> costs
    >
    > Boy, you want it all, don't you?
    >
    > In case you haven't noticed, the entire inkjet printer industry is based
    > on the fact that these things are throw-away devices. They design them
    > to fail, and expect them to fail, so as to keep people buying new ones
    > out of the factory.
    >
    > So durability is determined: they're not. Period.
    >
    Let's not forget that consumers want that low end stuff. And once
    the price gets low enough, there has to be design cutting.

    I paid $500 for my first printer, a Radio Shack dot matrix printer
    in the fall of 1982. It was terribly slow, had lousy print quality,
    and was pretty much the cheapest I could get a new printer for in
    Canada back then.

    My next printer was a Smith Corona daisy wheel, for $399 in the summer
    of 1984. I needed something that would print good quality, because
    the dot matrix sure wouldn't qualify. Real slow, and I had to roll
    in each sheet of paper just like in my previous typewriter. And,
    it too was about the cheapest I could get a new daisy wheel printer
    at the time.

    In 1989, I replaced both printers with a $300 dot matrix printer,
    that had "near letter quality" that indeed was good enough that I
    could get rid of the really slow daisy wheel. By this point, dot
    matrix printers had come of age, and I have no idea if something cheaper
    could be had.

    When I switched to a Macintosh in 1994, I picked up a used Imagewriter,
    for about thirty dollars. Could have been as old as ten years old at
    that, but still worked fine. Might have used it up to 2001, but I found
    a cheap Imagewriter II for about the same price a few years later, so
    I switched because the later model was supposed to be faster. Both
    printers could still run, had I not retired them.

    My first and only inkjet printer, I got in the spring of 2001. I
    paid $20 used, but this was one that would have originally sold for
    hundreds of dollars, because that's what printers used to sell for.
    But I wasn't happy about the ink useage (or cost), and even the fact
    that the printout smeared when wet, so I only used it through one
    refill.

    I snagged my first laser printer, and old TI, for $25 that fall. Printed
    out a few thousand pages with the toner in it, then retired it when the
    toner ran out. It was old, but also not too common, and I'd gotten my
    money's worth.

    Replaced it with an HP Laserjet 4P, for fifteen dollars at a Rotary
    Club sale. Had to shake the toner cartridge to get printout, but
    that lasted at least 500 pages. The printer itself had a mere 3000
    pages on its counter. Again, it sold for hundreds of dollars when new.
    I'll be keeping this one.

    This is the same issue as with winmodems. Consumers want low prices,
    and then they complain because there are tradeoffs. The tradeoffs come
    not because the companies want to cheat the consumer, the tradeoffs come
    because consumers want things cheap. As my history shows, printers
    traditionally cost good money, and you got something that would last.
    People no longer want to spend that money, so the only way to give
    them a printer that issues pretty pictures is to make a product that
    has faults, that may fail early because it's not as solidly built as
    a similar product made some years back. On the other hand, on those
    cheap printers is vastly better than printers I spent far more for
    decades ago. People print out high quality graphics like they make
    toast, when even a few years back we'd only print such things on
    the rare occasion because it just took too long, and th results weren't
    so great.

    Michael
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    Yes, and sadly, practically all consumers want the cheapest price point
    on everything related to consumer electronics, not only computers and
    peripherals. Prior to computers becoming a mainstream and commodity
    product, prices were high for everything. Remember the days of a
    Seagate ST-225 20MB hard drive at a price point of $300???

    Without a doubt, Microsoft certainly has its faults. But, without the
    gang from Redmond, WA, we would all still be paying ultra-premium prices
    for everything related to computing. With the commodity mentality of
    computer marketing today, low-end products are everywhere, especially in
    the ink-jet printer market.

    I, too, remember paying high prices for such products as an Okidata 82a
    or 182a 9-pin dot matrix printer. My first laser was a HP LaserJet IIIp
    (circa 1993) with a cost of nearly $1500. Only 4ppm, but built like a
    tank and still functioning today.

    I came from the electronics field, and the name HP meant first-class
    quality in the test equipment market. The biggest marketing mistake HP
    ever made was to enter the consumer computer market using the HP logo.
    After years of success in that market, they had to change their original
    name for the high-quality test equipment market to Agilent Technologies,
    due to the quality perception of their consumer computer line.

    You can still buy high-quality industrial-strength products that meet
    the original poster's basic technical requirements, but you do have to
    pay the price. A high-quality color laser printer is the best solution,
    but be prepared to pay multi-thousand dollar pricing for it. However,
    it will outlast a myriad of cheap inkjets, and be ultimately cheaper to
    operate.

    Linux is a fine operating system, but it really needs to get its act
    together regarding up-to-date hardware compatibility and drivers. Much
    of Linux development tends to target European standards, and most
    consumer computer users here in the USA don't use Postscript-based
    printers - rather PCL-based printers. Up until recently, some Linux
    distros did not inlcude PCL drivers for popular HP LaserJets! And, if
    your using a 3Com/USR controller-based PCI internal dial-up modem, good
    luck on finding a proper driver under Linux.

    I've used practically every distro of Linux since its rollout, and
    although Linux is certainly improving with every version, it's not ready
    for "prime time" for the average consumer computer user - close, but not
    close enough. For the hobbyist, or computer geek, yes it's a fine and
    stable OS. But, for someone who just wants to play a DVD, output photos
    to a photo printer, or easily install updates, Linux has some work to do
    before its accepted as a viable alternative to WinXP.

    Don
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    In article <FlBRc.3047$Ow6.289417@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    "Bill Haught" <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:

    > > So durability is determined: they're not. Period.
    >
    > I have read that really cheap inkjet printers (I think the price
    > mentioned was something like 20 or 30 dollars) tend to last about a
    > month. By "durable" I mean in relative terms. Epsons (and even
    > Canons) last longer than that. Of course, this may have been written
    > before the "milk 'em with the consumables" marketing reached today's
    > extremes (or perhaps they were referring to Lexmark?).

    I'm not sure it matters.

    When it's cheaper to buy a new printer than to put new cartridges into
    the old printer, you know where the manufacturer's coming from. They
    want to sell new printers.

    Canon just announced new printers in the $50 to $90 range. At $50, if
    it comes with cartridges installed, it's cheaper to buy a new printer
    than new cartridges if what you want is manufacturer ink.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 02:34:14 GMT, "Bill Haught"
    <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:

    >


    I usually put messages in the message body and perhaps a clue as to
    what the message is in the subject line.

    give that a try
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 01:14:20 +0000, Bill Haught wrote:

    > Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
    > Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    > interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
    > costs
    >
    > Note that while I may want to print out web pages with illustrations
    > and other images, photo quality is not important as the other
    > requirements (have two Epsons already) as long as the images are
    > readable.
    >
    > How well it prints on quality paper such as paper suitable for resumes
    > is also important.
    >
    > I imagine that a 300 by 300 dpi printer (if available) would be a
    > decent choice. The ink ought to be cheap to produce (and therefore
    > buy). The heads shouldn't be clog-prone, even with 3rd party inks.
    > Of course, I doubt that anyone manufacturers even produce
    > multifunction units at that "low" resolution anymore. Also, I prefer
    > new since buying used has the potential to turn out to be a case of
    > purchasing someone else's problems.
    >
    > Another concern is that a "low" res printer produced today would not
    > only be cheap but also be cheaply built.
    >
    > I prefer printheads that are either replaceable or on the cartridge.
    >
    > From what I have read so far, it sounds like nothing really matches my
    > criteria. Canon looked good until I read that "There are few good
    > free software drivers for Canon and Lexmark inkjets. Do not buy one
    > and expect success." http://www.linuxprinting.org/suggested.html
    >
    >
    > Also, from my understanding Postscript (and probably PCL) are unlikely
    > to be found in a inkjet in the price range I can consider (definitely
    > under $300, probably half that).
    >
    > Also, must be available in the 48 continental states of the United
    > Nations of Texas
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    >
    >
    > Bill Haught
    > Extract tooth to reply.
    > Enron is a case of compassionate conservatism.
    > Republicans have *morale* clarity.
    > Reselect George Bush http://georgewbush.org/ Four more wars!!!

    Strictly speaking, I think you are correct - the beast does not exits.
    Look for a cheapie that does some version of PCL and refill the cartridges
    - that's about as good as you can do. HP does make some low-cost units
    which work fine with linux - I got an Apollo P2200 a couple of years ago
    from OfficeMax - it's an HP print engine, basically Apollo was HP's low
    cost brand for a few seasons. I've been quite pleased with
    operation/durability.

    Mostly, for Linux, Canon makes good boat anchors.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    Bill Haught wrote:
    > Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
    > Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    > interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
    > costs

    If you want PostScript, durability, and other high-end features, be
    prepared to pay for them. Most of the commonly available printers are
    disposable, as others have said. However, HP does offer a high-end
    "Business Inkjet" line that offers PCL in all the models, and PostScript
    in the more expensive ones.

    The HP Business InkJet 1100 starts at an MSRP of $200 and offers PCL
    built-in. For $500 you can get the model 2300 with PostScript. Ink
    isn't terribly cheap at $34 per colour (four colours, estimated 1500
    pages per refill). However, these models will be *much* more durable
    than the home units.

    Check out any of the "Business InkJet" models (not the DeskJets) listed
    on HP's site:

    http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF02a/18972-236251-236261.html
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

    > In article <MdARc.2973$Ow6.280510@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    > "Bill Haught" <wlhaught@ameritech.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Subject: Inkjet printers meeting the following requirements? Durable,
    >> Linux-compatible (or Postscript or PCL in FIRMWARE (built-in
    >> interpreter)), quality text & graphics, low ink refill or cartridge
    >> costs
    >
    > Boy, you want it all, don't you?
    >
    > In case you haven't noticed, the entire inkjet printer industry is based
    > on the fact that these things are throw-away devices. They design them
    > to fail, and expect them to fail, so as to keep people buying new ones
    > out of the factory.

    Do something about it!

    One of my earlier posts.....

    Well you know guys, printers and ink are expensive
    and there is a nasty conspiracy to prevent it from
    becoming popular on the GNU/Linux platform.
    So what say some of you out there
    to an Open GNU/Linux printer project?

    The inkjet and laser printer can be standard
    mechanism as there are no patents,
    and the cartridges can be deliberaly designed
    for continued re-use forever - again no
    patents on those.
    The inks and powder are pennies as the
    raw materials are cheap before they are
    packaged into cartridges and us lot
    made to pay inflated prices for it.

    The printer electronics can be driven
    with GNU/Linux OS and could have
    as interface an ethernet port so that
    it works anywhere with any modern PC
    hooked up to ethernet. It can have a
    web interface to configure and control it.
    So even grandma can configure it by using
    her browser.
    It should have a socket for big memory
    (256Mb costs now only $20) and that memory can act as buffer for
    many print jobs or very high definition output
    using multi-size spot rendering - something that
    produces really high quality output (but requires
    big memory). The electronics and software is completely
    open, and easy to put into flash.
    Other items such as the print heads, the ink
    formulations, cartridges and everything
    under the sun is left as open projects.
    Anyone can copy and make their own version of printers and
    configure to their own language because it
    is an open project. A certain amount of knowhow
    and experience will give those involved
    in the project the edge over newbies
    when it comes to getting hold of
    investment but of course
    everyone should be doing their best anyway.

    To set up the project, we can start
    making the software, electronics and
    drivers, and then hope some investor
    or big government department, or some schools will give
    us the contract to produce several thousand printers
    and we are in the money. There is money in making
    the printer by the way - don't believe all you
    might hear - if you make it
    for $20, and sell it for $25, there are plenty
    of factories in China that can survive on that
    if the orders are 10,000 pieces at a time.

    Having studied these mechanisms before,
    I know it can be produced for between $10 and
    $20 for 10,000+ pieces FOB Hong Kong.

    To put it into production,
    the number of engineers required is 10 people
    working for about 6 months - thats about $50,000.
    I can get them to design all the plastics and
    metal parts. Then the cost of tooling is about $100,000.
    Add in contingency and some cash for processing the
    orders, the total investment figure is about $200,000.

    So for around 200,000 dollars new printers can be
    made. And if we take orders for say 100,000 pieces
    from someone like Wall Mart, there will be
    big orders for cartridges on the back of that.
    Any group of people with small beginnings can
    become a very large and open printer company.
    With GNU/Linux becoming ever more established,
    this could evolve into something of a big
    service to the open source community
    when M$ supporters might be trying to shaft us all
    from access to good printers.

    I'd love to be part of something like that
    if anyone wants to do it.
    I have experience of developing products in the Far East.


    >
    > So durability is determined: they're not. Period.
    >
    > Low ink costs? Canon, with refills. But they're not durable printers,
    > so....nor, due to price pressure from the buying public, will any of
    > them have anything even remotely resembling an on-board print processor.
    >
    > You need to move to color lasers to get on-board print processing, and
    > even then many of the low-end models don't have that.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    Have you considered this stategy:

    buy a new cheap printer that works with linux. Maybe even refill the
    cartridges a couple of times. When you need a new cartridge, stick the old
    printer in a yard sale, and go get another one. Seems that the cheaper
    printers cost less than cartridge replacements.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    In article <cf6tm6$4gb$1@freenet9.carleton.ca>,
    et472@FreeNet.Carleton.CA says...
    > I paid $500 for my first printer, a Radio Shack dot matrix printer
    > in the fall of 1982. It was terribly slow, had lousy print quality,
    > and was pretty much the cheapest I could get a new printer for in
    > Canada back then.
    >
    You tweaked my aging memory :-). My first printer was a "Base2" dot
    matrix that I bought about 1978 or so. It had serial, parallel, and
    IEEE interfaces. With connectors for those plus the power cord, there
    was very little sheet metal left on the back of it. I think it was
    about $700, but it could have been less.

    And I've still got the first graphics-capable CRT that came out for less
    than $1000 - $995 to be exact. Just can't bear to throw it away :-).

    --
    Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    Don Allen wrote:
    > Remember the days of a
    > Seagate ST-225 20MB hard drive at a price point of $300???

    I don't remember them being any cheaper than $500 until clearance time.
    I paid $600 for my first (with included controller, though).

    $30,000 per gigabyte. These days it's $0.75.

    --
    To his numbed, buttock-shifting listeners, the great sonorous self-regarding
    orotund bromidic banality of Senator Kerry and his multitude of nuances is proof
    of how much more serious he - and therefore they - are.
    <http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2004/08/01/do0102.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2004/08/01/ixop.html>
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    "Michael Black" <et472@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
    news:cf6tm6$4gb$1@freenet9.carleton.ca...

    > People no longer want to spend that money, so the only way to give
    > them a printer that issues pretty pictures is to make a product that
    > has faults, that may fail early because it's not as solidly built as
    > a similar product made some years back.

    So if you aren't a dumb consumer that wants a $9.99 toy or a Fortune
    500 company with deep pockets for a $ 5,000 laser that can chug out
    1,000 11 by 17 inch duplexed pages per milisecond with a mere four
    colors (I could care less about 16 million 64 to 256 would be fine),
    you are screwed.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware (More info?)

    New Thread

    Peripheral cons, unintelligible property, bipolar markets, & a
    political rant (actually somewhat on topic)

    news:wjRRc.3375$Ow6.359040@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com

    http://www.google.com/groups?safe=off&ie=UTF-8&as_umsgid=wjRRc.3375%24Ow6.359040@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com&lr=&num=100&hl=en
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.os.linux.hardware,comp.os.linux.help,comp.os.linux.questions (More info?)

    "7" <website_has_email@www.ecu.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:wyKRc.106378$28.84532@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...

    > > In case you haven't noticed, the entire inkjet printer industry is
    based
    > > on the fact that these things are throw-away devices. They design
    them
    > > to fail, and expect them to fail, so as to keep people buying new
    ones
    > > out of the factory.
    >
    > Do something about it!
    >
    Realistically, I'm not in a position to do so unless others can fork
    out the funds, but that is another story. There may be some ways I
    can contribute if I get lots of assistance. Furthermore, I really
    think that it is way past time for an overhaul of the basic info tech
    architecture starting at the hardware level. I am not sure anything
    should be salvaged such as http or POSIX. Currently we have routers,
    computers, and peripherals. I think that the capabilities of such
    equipment should be shifted around but that is a long story I'm not
    going to get into right now. A few examples would be to shift the
    hardware aspects of the processor and the signing of digital
    certificates into the router and have separate processors for
    applications and multimedia. Also, it seems to me that USB should
    have been layered on Ethernet.


    > One of my earlier posts.....
    >
    > Well you know guys, printers and ink are expensive
    > and there is a nasty conspiracy to prevent it from
    > becoming popular on the GNU/Linux platform.
    > So what say some of you out there
    > to an Open GNU/Linux printer project?

    There is a nasty conspiracy to destroy open source and it began long
    before computers. See Peripheral cons, unintelligible property,
    bipolar markets, & a political rant (actually somewhat on topic)
    news:wjRRc.3375$Ow6.359040@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com
    http://www.google.com/groups?safe=off&ie=UTF-8&as_umsgid=wjRRc.3375%24Ow6.359040@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com&lr=&num=100&hl=en

    The word "cons" was an editing mistake that should have read
    "consumer item" or something to that effect-honest!


    > The inkjet and laser printer can be standard
    > mechanism as there are no patents,
    > and the cartridges can be deliberately designed
    > for continued re-use forever - again no
    > patents on those.
    > The inks and powder are pennies as the
    > raw materials are cheap before they are
    > packaged into cartridges and us lot
    > made to pay inflated prices for it.

    There are patents on everything and they run forever (95 years).
    You'll run afoul of many of them. It will be necessary to have
    inventors and patent everything for a war chest against those who only
    care about profit maximization. Some patents are owned by companies
    that merely milk others using unintelligible property laws (corporate
    law/crook firms). It will be necessary to go about this carefully
    since who knows what speculators might do with the patents after
    staging a hostile takeover. The legalese will be more than the
    $200,000 right there.

    > I'd love to be part of something like that
    > if anyone wants to do it.
    > I have experience of developing products in the Far East.

    Mexico is cheap too but nothing gets done there without a little
    graft. I wonder about issues such as graft, infrastructure, etc.

    Doable? Maybe. At this point the concept isn't yet half baked and
    implementation a ways off. Then too half-baked implementations of
    half-baked ideas acquired massive amounts of capital a few years ago.

    While I firmly believe in open source and restoring communities, if a
    plan doesn't have a shot at profits commensurate with the risk, it
    probably won't get funding in times like these. There is the problem
    of dealing with the N.W.O. realities and making enough money off your
    own open source/GPL software to pay off debts let alone bringing home
    the bacon.
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