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how to know speed of slot 1 processors?

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  • Processors
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2005 9:33:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

I have several Slot 1 processors, mostly PII but also a few celeron & a
couple PIII. I have no idea if I'm overclocking, underclocking or what
as I am unable to determine the intended speed of each. I assume it's
written on the processor someplace, but where? Thanks for any info!

bill

__
alienbill@wyoming.com

More about : speed slot processors

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2005 5:53:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

"alienbill" <alienbill@wyoming.com> wrote in message...
> I have several Slot 1 processors, mostly PII but also a few celeron &
> a couple PIII. I have no idea if I'm overclocking, underclocking or
> what as I am unable to determine the intended speed of each. I assume
> it's written on the processor someplace, but where?

It's normally silk screened on the top edge of the SECC package, although
Intel used a couple of different package designs during the Slot 1
production run, so you might have to pull the CPU out of the system before
you'll be able to see. In the case of some of the later SECC2 P!!!'s and
most of the Celerons, it's written on the PCB itself. If you have the
processor in hand there's no reason why you should have to ask.

Mind you, I fail to see why you can't determine what processor you're
running by a non-invasive method. A utility like CPU-Z should be able to
tell you what you need to know.
--


Richard Hopkins
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
(replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2005 5:53:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Richard Hopkins <richh@dsl.nospam.com> wrote:
> It's normally silk screened on the top edge of the SECC package, although
> Intel used a couple of different package designs during the Slot 1
> production run, so you might have to pull the CPU out of the system before
> you'll be able to see.

There's some blue lettering on the top edge of the processor. It's a
string of numbers and letters that looks more like a bios string and I
can't decipher it. Part of the string reads ...X300... so I thought
300mhz, but that's on all my PII processors yet they are of different
speeds. I don't see anything so clear as say the last 3 digits from the
back of a PI chip.

> Mind you, I fail to see why you can't determine what processor you're
> running by a non-invasive method. A utility like CPU-Z should be able to
> tell you what you need to know.

Sorry if I wasn't clear.

These are parts of systems I am putting together thus no software is
installed yet. I can pull the processors out for inspection, but run
into the problem mentioned above.

Thanks for your help.

bill

__
alienbill@wyoming.com
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2005 5:53:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

alienbill wrote:
> Richard Hopkins <richh@dsl.nospam.com> wrote:
>
>>It's normally silk screened on the top edge of the SECC package, although
>>Intel used a couple of different package designs during the Slot 1
>>production run, so you might have to pull the CPU out of the system before
>>you'll be able to see.
>
>
> There's some blue lettering on the top edge of the processor. It's a
> string of numbers and letters that looks more like a bios string and I
> can't decipher it. Part of the string reads ...X300... so I thought
> 300mhz, but that's on all my PII processors yet they are of different
> speeds. I don't see anything so clear as say the last 3 digits from the
> back of a PI chip.

Look for the sSpec number. It's a 5-digit alphanumeric identifier
beginning with 'S', and will be printed on the top edge of the
processor. Plug it in here:

http://processorfinder.intel.com

>>Mind you, I fail to see why you can't determine what processor you're
>>running by a non-invasive method. A utility like CPU-Z should be able to
>>tell you what you need to know.
>
>
> Sorry if I wasn't clear.
>
> These are parts of systems I am putting together thus no software is
> installed yet. I can pull the processors out for inspection, but run
> into the problem mentioned above.
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
> bill
>
> __
> alienbill@wyoming.com
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 15, 2005 8:21:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

"alienbill" wrote in message...
> There's some blue lettering on the top edge of the processor.
> It's a string of numbers and letters that looks more like a bios
> string and I can't decipher it.

It's probably the product code, and thus shouldn't be overly difficult to
interpret. The clock speed, front side bus speed and amount of onboard cache
should all be included in clear numbering.

SECC2 cartridges (Celerons, Pentium!!!'s and later Pentium II's) have their
clock speed, bus speed, S-Spec and place of manufacture on a white label on
the "back" (non-processor side) of the PCB. SECC CPU's have basically the
same information printed on the top of the plastic cartridge. If you can't
see it, either it's been deliberately scrubbed off, or you need to look
harder.

> Part of the string reads ...X300... so I thought 300mhz, but that's
> on all my PII processors yet they are of different speeds.

If you quote the entire string we should be able to tell you what each
section means.

> I don't see anything so clear as say the last 3 digits from the
> back of a PI chip.

You wouldn't, as product codes from the Pentium II onwards got far more
complex with the increasing variety of bus speeds, cache levels, product
lines and so-on.
--


Richard Hopkins
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
(replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 16, 2005 2:20:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

Richard Hopkins wrote:

> "alienbill" wrote in message...
>
>> There's some blue lettering on the top edge of the processor.
>> It's a string of numbers and letters that looks more like a bios
>> string and I can't decipher it.
>
>
> It's probably the product code, and thus shouldn't be overly difficult
> to interpret. The clock speed, front side bus speed and amount of
> onboard cache should all be included in clear numbering.
>
> SECC2 cartridges (Celerons, Pentium!!!'s and later Pentium II's) have
> their clock speed, bus speed, S-Spec and place of manufacture on a white
> label on the "back" (non-processor side) of the PCB. SECC CPU's have
> basically the same information printed on the top of the plastic
> cartridge. If you can't see it, either it's been deliberately scrubbed
> off, or you need to look harder.

Yeah. Like the Slot-1 Celeron I have here

08471058- SL2WM
300A/66 COSTA RICA

With a little intuition we can pretty much rule out "COSTA RICA" as a
speed, as well as 08471058 and SL2WM (which is the S-Spec).

Which leaves 300A/66 sounding suspiciously like 300 Mhz on a 66 Mhz FSB
because that's what it is.
>
>> Part of the string reads ...X300... so I thought 300mhz, but that's
>> on all my PII processors yet they are of different speeds.
>
>
> If you quote the entire string we should be able to tell you what each
> section means.
>
> > I don't see anything so clear as say the last 3 digits from the
>
>> back of a PI chip.
>
>
> You wouldn't, as product codes from the Pentium II onwards got far more
> complex with the increasing variety of bus speeds, cache levels, product
> lines and so-on.
!