Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

How to set your dell optiplex gx 280 processor to 64 bit

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
February 21, 2011 4:27:54 PM

i have a dell optiplex gx 280 . i want to reach the instruction set of its processor . where do i find iT
a c 228 $ Windows 7
February 21, 2011 4:44:37 PM

I don't quite understand the question. You didn't state which CPU you have, but odds are that it is a 64 bit processer. You need to install a 64 bit OS to take advantage of it.

If you are just trying to use the 64 bit registers in the CPU, I'm sure there is some assembly instruction that tells it to use 64 bit mode.
m
0
l
February 22, 2011 1:28:23 PM

can you tell me where is that assembly instruction
m
0
l
Related resources
February 22, 2011 1:33:26 PM

I hate to sound rude but you should not mess with settings or functions of your computer that you do not understand. What ends are you trying to get to?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 2:10:17 PM

Your processor needs to be 64bit to run 64bit OS if its not then you cant.
m
0
l
a c 352 $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 2:48:39 PM

OSAMAMUNIR said:
can you tell me where is that assembly instruction


Are you trying to re-code the CPU instructions and silicon? Have a 1 billion dollar lab handy? You can't just program a CPU to run 64 bit code if it's not designed to do it. You'd need to open it up, add a few layers of design, probably toss out most of the existing architechture, re-dope the silicon, etc... You have 2 picks here, spend $40 on a used CPU or buy a chip fab, AMD may have one for sale, although they already spun off their fabs in a separate business, they still own a peice of it.

Install and run the program CPU-Z and it will tell you if the CPU can run 64 bit applications. http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z/versions-history.h..., download link is on the right.
m
0
l
a c 228 $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 2:56:19 PM

OSAMAMUNIR said:
can you tell me where is that assembly instruction


it's not a matter of where. If you know how to program in assembly language, you can write the code to use the processors 64 bit mode (assuming you have a 64 bit processor).

This would be no different than compiling a C/C++ program using a 64 bit compiler vs. a 32 bit compiler.

If you do not have any programming skills you are out of luck. Again, your original post (and description) is confusing and hard to read. What are you trying to accomplish and what are your system specs?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 3:25:05 PM

As you really want to know, here are the instructions to enable 64-bit mode (properly called long mode):

  1. mov $0xc0000080, %ecx # These 2 instructions read the Extended Feature
  2. rdmsr # Enable register
  3. bts $0, %eax # This enables the syscall/sysret instructions
  4. bts $8, %eax # bit 8 of this register is Long Mode Enable (but we won't
  5. wrmsr # actually be in Long Mode until paging is enabled)
  6.  
  7. mov %cr0, %eax # enable paging
  8. bts $31, %eax
  9. mov %eax, %cr0

Happy coding!

Edit: Unfortunately, those instructions require a 64-bit processor which your computer does not have.
m
0
l
a c 228 $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 3:37:20 PM

Ijack said:
As you really want to know, here are the instructions to enable 64-bit mode (properly called long mode):

  1. mov $0xc0000080, %ecx # These 2 instructions read the Extended Feature
  2. rdmsr # Enable register
  3. bts $0, %eax # This enables the syscall/sysret instructions
  4. bts $8, %eax # bit 8 of this register is Long Mode Enable (but we won't
  5. wrmsr # actually be in Long Mode until paging is enabled)
  6.  
  7. mov %cr0, %eax # enable paging
  8. bts $31, %eax
  9. mov %eax, %cr0

Happy coding!

Edit: Unfortunately, those instructions require a 64-bit processor which your computer does not have.


:lol:  My assembly is a little rusty as I don't have to use it too often, but I wasn't going to post all that because I know it will probably just put a blank look on the Ops face. Sorry OSAMAMUNIR, but it is funny.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2011 3:48:51 PM

It took me a long time to get that bit of code working.

To be more serious, and answer what I suspect the OP is really asking, you can't - as an end user - just switch a processor to 64-bit. Either it's a 64-bit processor or it isn't, and I don't think that any GX280s came from the factory with 64-bit processors (although there's a very remote possibility that it might have been upgraded to one). You don't switch the processor to 64-bit mode, you use a 64-bit Operating System which does that for you. If you try to install a 64-bit OS on a 32-bit processor it just won't allow you to do so.

The only time that you would be interested in the code I gave is if you were writing your own OS.
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 1:51:24 AM

you know my computer is capable of 64-bit. it is in its bios
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 1:53:00 AM

sorry i wrote it wrong . i want to say that my processor is capable of EM64T. I think you know about that
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 23, 2011 6:46:23 AM

In that case, just install a 64-bit Operating System. Problem solved.

To reach the instruction set of the processor just write some assembly code and use a 64-bit assembler. You'll need to be running a 64-bit OS for that to work.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 23, 2011 1:31:47 PM

OSAMAMUNIR said:
sorry i wrote it wrong . i want to say that my processor is capable of EM64T. I think you know about that

yes, I know about that. LOL
give the specifics of your current processor.

and if it states that in the BIOS then install the 64-bit OS.
me personally wouldn't run 64-bit OS on a P4HT single core... maybe just me.
how much RAM do you have and it's specs.?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 23, 2011 6:11:01 PM

Just because the BIOS has options relevant to a 64-bit processor doesn't mean that a 64-bit processor is installed. The speedometer on my car goes up to 120mph, but ....
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 24, 2011 10:45:23 AM

CPUid will tell you if your processor is 64bit or not.
m
0
l
!