intel multiplier unlocked?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
change the
multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
9 answers Last reply
More about intel multiplier unlocked
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Could you indicate the location of the aBit claim?

    Phil Weldon

    "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    > abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    > change the
    > multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    > and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    > I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    > this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    hkl wrote:
    > abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    > change the
    > multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    > and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    > I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    > this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >


    This is correct, I think that news was first released in Yanuary on all
    big hardware sites. It's not just Abit either, Gigabyte,ASUS and a few
    others can also do this on LGA 775 P4 3.4 Ghz and higher (560 and higher
    I think.)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Again, could you provide a specific location on the web for this
    information?

    Phil Weldon

    "Glitch" <Glitch_120@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:d4ocrr$msn$1@bagan.srce.hr...
    > hkl wrote:
    >> abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    >> change the
    >> multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    >> and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    >> I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    >> this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >>
    >
    >
    > This is correct, I think that news was first released in Yanuary on all
    > big hardware sites. It's not just Abit either, Gigabyte,ASUS and a few
    > others can also do this on LGA 775 P4 3.4 Ghz and higher (560 and higher I
    > think.)
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    > abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one
    > can change the multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775,
    > 3.4ghz and higher.

    This is true. For what it's worth it's not just Abit. Think you'llf ind
    that most top line Intel boards now offer a variation on this feature.

    > Is this just a lie to increase sales?

    Of course not. If it was someone would have sued them for false advertising,
    wouldn't they?

    > I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to
    > do this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.

    Abit's claim is correct. However, the subject like of your post is
    incorrect. These motherboards do not *unlock* the multiplier on the CPU's in
    question. These (FMB2/04B) processors have an additional (usually 14x)
    multiplier on them which is normally only automatically invoked by FMB1/04A
    motherboards that don't support the chip's full speed. All the boards in
    question do is enable manual access to the additional multiplier(s),
    allowing you to significantly increase the FSB for the same overall core
    speed.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    > Abit's claim is correct. However, the subject like of your post is
    > incorrect. These motherboards do not *unlock* the multiplier on the
    > CPU's in
    > question. These (FMB2/04B) processors have an additional (usually 14x)
    > multiplier on them which is normally only automatically invoked by FMB1/04A
    > motherboards that don't support the chip's full speed. All the boards in
    > question do is enable manual access to the additional multiplier(s),
    > allowing you to significantly increase the FSB for the same overall core
    > speed.

    LOL...just as I figured, Abit isn't exactly lying outright,
    they are deceiving their customers with half-truth.

    Abit's claim on their site implies that one can unlock the
    multiplier so that the user can set it to whatever value is desired
    (10,11,12,13,14, etc.). The truth is
    quite different: one can choose any multiplier you want,
    as long as it's 14. merely having the choice between two values,
    (17 and 14) is pretty much worthless.
    As I suspected, an unlocked CPU is too good
    to be true.

    thanks for clearing this up.

    Jeff
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Found a reference. Evidently the 'unlock' feature allows the multiplier to
    be LOWER one or two steps, evidently part of the Intel thermal guideline
    solution. Since this LOWERS the CPU speed, it would require a HIGHER FSB
    speed. So the result would seem to be - no much. See
    http://www20.tomshardware.com/motherboard/20040916/asus_overclocking-06.html
    ..

    Phil Weldon

    "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    > abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    > change the
    > multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    > and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    > I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    > this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Intel has decided NOT to lock the multipler on some of the new high end dual
    core chips. Can't remember where I read it. But it was probanly hardocp.com
    or a link from there.
    "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    > abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    > change the
    > multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    > and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    > I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    > this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Phil Weldon wrote:
    > Found a reference. Evidently the 'unlock' feature allows the multiplier to
    > be LOWER one or two steps, evidently part of the Intel thermal guideline
    > solution. Since this LOWERS the CPU speed, it would require a HIGHER FSB
    > speed. So the result would seem to be - no much. See
    > http://www20.tomshardware.com/motherboard/20040916/asus_overclocking-06.html

    This thread reminds me of the hype frequently found in eBay listings for
    Intel Engineering Samples - "Unlocked Multiplier", "Overclocker's Dream"
    etc. etc.

    I've played with quite a few Intel ES chips over the years, all
    supported multipliers less than or equal to the nominal CPU speed, none
    would run at higher multipliers. They aren't unlocked, they merely
    support several multiplier values. Overclocking still requires
    increasing FSB.

    P2B

    > "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    > news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    >
    >>abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    >>change the
    >>multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    >>and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    >>I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    >>this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking (More info?)

    Reminds me of "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" B^)

    Phil Weldon

    "P2B" <p2b@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:tLXbe.8075$BW6.885781@news20.bellglobal.com...
    >
    >
    > Phil Weldon wrote:
    >> Found a reference. Evidently the 'unlock' feature allows the multiplier
    >> to be LOWER one or two steps, evidently part of the Intel thermal
    >> guideline solution. Since this LOWERS the CPU speed, it would require a
    >> HIGHER FSB speed. So the result would seem to be - no much. See
    >> http://www20.tomshardware.com/motherboard/20040916/asus_overclocking-06.html
    >
    > This thread reminds me of the hype frequently found in eBay listings for
    > Intel Engineering Samples - "Unlocked Multiplier", "Overclocker's Dream"
    > etc. etc.
    >
    > I've played with quite a few Intel ES chips over the years, all supported
    > multipliers less than or equal to the nominal CPU speed, none would run at
    > higher multipliers. They aren't unlocked, they merely support several
    > multiplier values. Overclocking still requires increasing FSB.
    >
    > P2B
    >
    >> "hkl" <hjk@lkl.net> wrote in message
    >> news:V82dnV_Hn6gSOPLfRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
    >>
    >>>abit claims that on some of their 915/925 mobos (e.g. AA8, AG8), one can
    >>>change the
    >>>multiplier of some specific p4s (namely, socket 775, 3.4ghz
    >>>and higher. Is this just a lie to increase sales?
    >>>I would like to hear from anyone who has actually tried to do
    >>>this with qualifying mobo/cpu combinations.
    >>>
    >>
    >>
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