Disk won't spin up/Possible voltage problem

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE drive. It
does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer I hold it
vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters inside turning.
I would like to determine if I am having a voltage problem. If I am
having a voltage problem I'd like to attempt to breathe enough life
into it to get my data back. Has anyone out there dealt with this
type of issue before?

It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up. There
are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.

TIA,
Paul
14 answers Last reply
More about disk spin possible voltage problem
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    "Paul" <truerelaxation@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:7fabd546.0404230851.6884dd8f@posting.google.com...
    > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE drive. It
    > does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer I hold it
    > vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters inside turning.
    > I would like to determine if I am having a voltage problem. If I am
    > having a voltage problem I'd like to attempt to breathe enough life
    > into it to get my data back. Has anyone out there dealt with this
    > type of issue before?
    >
    > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up. There
    > are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.
    >
    > TIA,
    > Paul
    I doubt that it is a voltage problem, it IS possible though. IF it just
    won't spin then I would guess the drive motor is shot. If you really want
    to test the voltage Unplug EVERYTHING except the motherboard and the hard
    drive and turn it on and see if it spins up. It *Should* spin up at this
    point, assuming of course you aren't running like a 50watt power supply.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    I've heard of people using an electric drill/screwdriver with a rubber
    tip to jump start them. But you'll have to take it apart, which will
    void your warranty. And there's no guarantee it will work.
    Interestingly, just a couple of days ago I pulled out an old server with
    an IBM Ultrastar. It no longer spins up! I'm quite sure the warranty is
    expired. If so I'll try that trick.

    Paul wrote:

    > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE drive. It
    > does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer I hold it
    > vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters inside turning.
    > I would like to determine if I am having a voltage problem. If I am
    > having a voltage problem I'd like to attempt to breathe enough life
    > into it to get my data back. Has anyone out there dealt with this
    > type of issue before?
    >
    > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up. There
    > are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.
    >
    > TIA,
    > Paul
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    "Chris Stolworthy" <cstolworthy12@REMOVEcableone.net> wrote in message news:<108il306iiv4s85@corp.supernews.com>...
    > "Paul" <truerelaxation@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:7fabd546.0404230851.6884dd8f@posting.google.com...
    > > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE drive. It
    > > does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer I hold it
    > > vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters inside turning.
    > > I would like to determine if I am having a voltage problem. If I am
    > > having a voltage problem I'd like to attempt to breathe enough life
    > > into it to get my data back. Has anyone out there dealt with this
    > > type of issue before?
    > >
    > > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up. There
    > > are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.
    > >
    > > TIA,
    > > Paul
    > I doubt that it is a voltage problem, it IS possible though. IF it just
    > won't spin then I would guess the drive motor is shot. If you really want
    > to test the voltage Unplug EVERYTHING except the motherboard and the hard
    > drive and turn it on and see if it spins up. It *Should* spin up at this
    > point, assuming of course you aren't running like a 50watt power supply.

    I did plug it into power with another drive and the other drive spun
    up. I switched power connectors and the other drive still spun up.
    This drive didn't spin either time. So, I know that my power
    connectors are good. The other drive is a WD400JB. It's identical to
    the dead drive except its 40GB instead of 80GB.

    I'm guessing that I have to uncover the platters in order to get at
    the motor and that will pretty much ruin everything since I don't have
    a clean room. What are your thoughts on my chances of replacing the
    motor? Any recommendations on how to proceed? I'm not looking to
    save the drive, just get my data off of it.

    TIA,
    Paul
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    Paul,

    Many will offer outlandish procedures in opening the drive and doing
    this and that, which will ultimately lead to No data recovery and a
    lot of frustration. If the data is extremely important, a data
    recovery company is the only way to go.


    "Paul" <truerelaxation@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:7fabd546.0404231725.2abd0557@posting.google.com...
    > "Chris Stolworthy" <cstolworthy12@REMOVEcableone.net> wrote in
    message news:<108il306iiv4s85@corp.supernews.com>...
    > > "Paul" <truerelaxation@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:7fabd546.0404230851.6884dd8f@posting.google.com...
    > > > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE
    drive. It
    > > > does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer I hold it
    > > > vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters inside
    turning.
    > > > I would like to determine if I am having a voltage problem. If
    I am
    > > > having a voltage problem I'd like to attempt to breathe enough
    life
    > > > into it to get my data back. Has anyone out there dealt with
    this
    > > > type of issue before?
    > > >
    > > > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up.
    There
    > > > are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.
    > > >
    > > > TIA,
    > > > Paul
    > > I doubt that it is a voltage problem, it IS possible though. IF
    it just
    > > won't spin then I would guess the drive motor is shot. If you
    really want
    > > to test the voltage Unplug EVERYTHING except the motherboard and
    the hard
    > > drive and turn it on and see if it spins up. It *Should* spin up
    at this
    > > point, assuming of course you aren't running like a 50watt power
    supply.
    >
    > I did plug it into power with another drive and the other drive spun
    > up. I switched power connectors and the other drive still spun up.
    > This drive didn't spin either time. So, I know that my power
    > connectors are good. The other drive is a WD400JB. It's identical
    to
    > the dead drive except its 40GB instead of 80GB.
    >
    > I'm guessing that I have to uncover the platters in order to get at
    > the motor and that will pretty much ruin everything since I don't
    have
    > a clean room. What are your thoughts on my chances of replacing the
    > motor? Any recommendations on how to proceed? I'm not looking to
    > save the drive, just get my data off of it.
    >
    > TIA,
    > Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    On 23 Apr 2004 18:25:08 -0700, truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote:


    >I did plug it into power with another drive and the other drive spun
    >up. I switched power connectors and the other drive still spun up.
    >This drive didn't spin either time. So, I know that my power
    >connectors are good. The other drive is a WD400JB. It's identical to
    >the dead drive except its 40GB instead of 80GB.
    >
    >I'm guessing that I have to uncover the platters in order to get at
    >the motor and that will pretty much ruin everything since I don't have
    >a clean room. What are your thoughts on my chances of replacing the
    >motor? Any recommendations on how to proceed? I'm not looking to
    >save the drive, just get my data off of it.

    There is practically no chance of replacing the motor. It would be easier
    to buy same drive and swap platters but that is also beyond anyone not
    trained in doing it.

    In the past I have encountered drives which had seized bearings and opened
    them, semi-gently rotated the platters a bit and managed to free them up.
    The drives worked for a few moments but sooner or later (usually sooner,
    even within a few seconds) they violently seize up again and can even move
    themselves a few inches across a desk when it happens. You could go ahead
    and try that if you simply can't/won't spend the money for a data recovery
    service, but if the service is an option then do NOTHING more to the
    drive, just send it directly to them.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    If the wire to the motor is broken, or the motor is broken, your pretty much
    finished.
    If it's stuck you may have a shot.
    Put it in the freezer for about 20 minutes. This will contract
    everything.
    Have your system ready, back up media ready, install it as fast as you can
    and hope it spins up.
    If it does, you have about 3 minutes.

    Sammy
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message news:<7fabd546.0404230851.6884dd8f@posting.google.com>...

    > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE
    > drive. It does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer
    > I hold it vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters
    > inside turning. I would like to determine if I am having a
    > voltage problem.

    Measure the voltages at the drive circuit board with a digital meter
    -- cheap, simple, and almost obvious. You can also measure the AC
    voltages at the motor contacts, and while I don't know what they're
    supposed to be, you can compare them to those of a working WD drive in
    the same series, as your WD400JB may be. Be careful not to short any
    contacts together or to any metal.

    When you tested the drive with another power supply, did you plug it
    into the 40-pin cable? If so, try it with the cable disconnected
    because some drives will spin only without the cable, indicating a
    problem not related to the motor.

    > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up.
    > There are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.

    > I'm guessing that I have to uncover the platters in order to get at
    > the motor and that will pretty much ruin everything since I don't
    > have clean room. What are your thoughts on my chances of replacing
    > the motor? Any recommendations on how to proceed?

    With drives about 100M-1G and larger, the moment you remove the cover
    you virtually ruin the drive and at least double the cost of data
    recovery.
    Also WD motors seem to be installed from the inside, meaning any
    replacement requires removing the platters and therefore ruining the
    alignment of all but the first platter (it has the servo marks written
    on it).

    Since you can hear the platters turn, the motor bearings have
    obviously not seized, so about the only thing lefts in the motor
    itself are the windings, one of which may have shorted. But just
    because a motor doesn't run doesn't mean it's bad because the real
    problem could be in the chip that drives the motor, and in some
    installations that chip can exceed 80C, especially if the drive is
    horizontal, has less than .5" of space around it, no air blowing over
    the circuit board, and the chip faces the drive body.

    The only practical repair you can do yourself is a circuit board swap
    from another identical WD800JB drive, but don't assume that all
    WD800JBs are identical; look at the suffix to the part number to make
    sure they are. I have, for example, a WD1200JB-00DUA3 and a
    WD1200JB-75CRA0, and they differ in the number of platters and their
    circuit board layouts (I have no idea if the boards are
    interchangeable).

    If you open the drive, you'll lose your drive and your data and make
    data recovery cost much more. If you leave the drive closed you'll at
    least get a replacement drive.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    "mr potatohead" <"mr potatohead"> wrote in message news:<oPqdnbF0wsplKRTdRVn2iw@giganews.com>...

    > I've heard of people using an electric drill/screwdriver with a rubber
    > tip to jump start them. But you'll have to take it apart, which will
    > void your warranty. And there's no guarantee it will work.
    > Interestingly, just a couple of days ago I pulled out an old server with
    > an IBM Ultrastar. It no longer spins up! I'm quite sure the warranty is
    > expired. If so I'll try that trick.

    Sometimes if just one winding is bad, the motor can be started by
    rotating it about 1/8 turn, which can be done by holding the drive
    horizontally and quickly twisting it. But if the problem is stiction
    (rare), turning the power on and off while flicking a finger hard
    against the top of the drive will often loosen it, but the drive
    should sit firmly on a tabletop while this is done. When stiction
    exists, turning a motor manually, even by hand, often tears a head off
    one of the arms.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me) wrote in message news:<101710fa.0404241517.4e9b6920@posting.google.com>...
    > truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message news:<7fabd546.0404230851.6884dd8f@posting.google.com>...
    >
    > > I have a Western Digitial WD800JB. It's a 7200RPM 80GB IDE
    > > drive. It does not spin up. With the disk out of the computer
    > > I hold it vertically and turn the case. I can hear the platters
    > > inside turning. I would like to determine if I am having a
    > > voltage problem.
    >
    > Measure the voltages at the drive circuit board with a digital meter
    > -- cheap, simple, and almost obvious. You can also measure the AC
    > voltages at the motor contacts, and while I don't know what they're
    > supposed to be, you can compare them to those of a working WD drive in
    > the same series, as your WD400JB may be. Be careful not to short any
    > contacts together or to any metal.
    >
    > When you tested the drive with another power supply, did you plug it
    > into the 40-pin cable? If so, try it with the cable disconnected
    > because some drives will spin only without the cable, indicating a
    > problem not related to the motor.
    >
    > > It's still under warranty. Most of my data has been backed up.
    > > There are some pictures and a few documents I'd like to recover.
    >
    > > I'm guessing that I have to uncover the platters in order to get at
    > > the motor and that will pretty much ruin everything since I don't
    > > have clean room. What are your thoughts on my chances of replacing
    > > the motor? Any recommendations on how to proceed?
    >
    > With drives about 100M-1G and larger, the moment you remove the cover
    > you virtually ruin the drive and at least double the cost of data
    > recovery.
    > Also WD motors seem to be installed from the inside, meaning any
    > replacement requires removing the platters and therefore ruining the
    > alignment of all but the first platter (it has the servo marks written
    > on it).
    >
    > Since you can hear the platters turn, the motor bearings have
    > obviously not seized, so about the only thing lefts in the motor
    > itself are the windings, one of which may have shorted. But just
    > because a motor doesn't run doesn't mean it's bad because the real
    > problem could be in the chip that drives the motor, and in some
    > installations that chip can exceed 80C, especially if the drive is
    > horizontal, has less than .5" of space around it, no air blowing over
    > the circuit board, and the chip faces the drive body.
    >
    > The only practical repair you can do yourself is a circuit board swap
    > from another identical WD800JB drive, but don't assume that all
    > WD800JBs are identical; look at the suffix to the part number to make
    > sure they are. I have, for example, a WD1200JB-00DUA3 and a
    > WD1200JB-75CRA0, and they differ in the number of platters and their
    > circuit board layouts (I have no idea if the boards are
    > interchangeable).
    >
    > If you open the drive, you'll lose your drive and your data and make
    > data recovery cost much more. If you leave the drive closed you'll at
    > least get a replacement drive

    I have measured the voltage where the power connector attaches to the
    circuit board. The voltages are as marked on the board, +5V and +12V.
    I didn't measure the AC voltage. I thought about comparing it to the
    40GB drive but didn't do it yet. I did try to spin it up with the IDE
    cable disconnected. I am restoring my system onto a second 40GB drive
    while I wait for the advance replacement to arrive. When I get it
    back up and running I'll try the suggestions posted.

    I will measure the AC voltage to see how it compares to the 40GB
    drive, try the freezer method and the quick 1/8th of a turn procedure.
    If I don't have any luck with any of these I might try to find a
    drive with the exact part number on ebay so I can replace the circuit
    board. From the sounds of it there is a very slim chance that the
    replacement drive will have a circuit board that will work with this
    drive. I thought I might give it a try anyway just to see what
    happens. The part number of the bad drive is WD800JB-00ETA0,
    manufactured on September 16, 2003.

    Thanks for all of the great suggestions so far.

    Paul
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message news:<7fabd546.0404251835.183415cd@posting.google.com>...

    No editing of my quote? I didn't realize that my words were so
    concise and important. ;)

    > I have measured the voltage where the power connector attaches to the
    > circuit board. The voltages are as marked on the board, +5V and +12V.
    > I didn't measure the AC voltage. I thought about comparing it to the
    > 40GB drive but didn't do it yet. I did try to spin it up with the IDE
    > cable disconnected.

    You may want to measure voltages elsewhere on the circuit board, such
    as across any electrolytic capacitors (many are surface mount --
    yellow rectangular blocks colored silver at each end), but this can be
    difficult on a Western Digital drive since the components are on the
    inner side and require finding where the copper traces connect to the
    outer side. Generally, heavier traces indicate power and ground. Be
    very careful not to short traces together if you try to measure them.

    > I will measure the AC voltage to see how it compares to the 40GB
    > drive, try the freezer method and the quick 1/8th of a turn
    > procedure. If I don't have any luck with any of these I might
    > try to find a drive with the exact part number on ebay so I can
    > replace the circuit board.
    > The part number of the bad drive is WD800JB-00ETA0, manufactured
    > on September 16, 2003.

    Be careful about the freezer method because you don't want to cool the
    drive below its dew point since that can create shorts. It's safer to
    cool the drive for an hour or 2 in the refrigerator.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me) wrote in message news:<101710fa.0404260147.157629e8@posting.google.com>...
    > truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message news:<7fabd546.0404251835.183415cd@posting.google.com>...
    >
    > No editing of my quote? I didn't realize that my words were so
    > concise and important. ;)
    >
    > > I have measured the voltage where the power connector attaches to the
    > > circuit board. The voltages are as marked on the board, +5V and +12V.
    > > I didn't measure the AC voltage. I thought about comparing it to the
    > > 40GB drive but didn't do it yet. I did try to spin it up with the IDE
    > > cable disconnected.
    >
    > You may want to measure voltages elsewhere on the circuit board, such
    > as across any electrolytic capacitors (many are surface mount --
    > yellow rectangular blocks colored silver at each end), but this can be
    > difficult on a Western Digital drive since the components are on the
    > inner side and require finding where the copper traces connect to the
    > outer side. Generally, heavier traces indicate power and ground. Be
    > very careful not to short traces together if you try to measure them.
    >
    > > I will measure the AC voltage to see how it compares to the 40GB
    > > drive, try the freezer method and the quick 1/8th of a turn
    > > procedure. If I don't have any luck with any of these I might
    > > try to find a drive with the exact part number on ebay so I can
    > > replace the circuit board.
    > > The part number of the bad drive is WD800JB-00ETA0, manufactured
    > > on September 16, 2003.
    >
    > Be careful about the freezer method because you don't want to cool the
    > drive below its dew point since that can create shorts. It's safer to
    > cool the drive for an hour or 2 in the refrigerator.

    I measured the AC voltage at the motor on the dead 80GB drive compared
    to the functioning 40GB drive. I tested with IDE cables connected
    then disconnected. The results were the same. The 40GB drive was
    showing voltage while the 80GB drive was not. Looks like a dead
    circuit board so far.

    I have an advance RMA from Western Digital on the way. From what I've
    heard I will need a circuit board from the exact drive model that was
    manufactured in the same month. What are the chances of being able to
    successfully borrow the circuit board from the replacement drive that
    is being shipped now just to retrieve my data?

    Are there any other potential gotchas? Can I fry anything? Is it a
    pain to detatch the circuit board from the motor?

    TIA,
    Paul
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message news:<7fabd546.0404271500.4ef68eab@posting.google.com>...

    > I have an advance RMA from Western Digital on the way.
    > From what I've heard I will need a circuit board from
    > the exact drive model that was manufactured in the
    > same month. What are the chances of being able to
    < successfully borrow the circuit board from the
    > replacement drive that is being shipped now just to
    > retrieve my data?
    >
    > Are there any other potential gotchas? Can I fry anything?
    > Is it a pain to detatch the circuit board from the motor?

    The drive doesn't have to be manufactured in the same month but just
    have the same exact full part number, including the suffix after the
    main part.

    I doubt you'll fry anything if you're reasonably careful and take the
    usual precautions against ham-fistedness (don't force anything) and
    static. To prevent static, work in short sleeves, barefoot, and cover
    your entire work surface in a square yard of pink anti-static foam
    sheet or anti-static bubble wrap, usually also pink. You can use
    aluminum foil, but be sure it is NOT connected to earth ground (use a
    plastic or wooden table, not a metal one), and never use foil when
    working on motherboards or anything else containing a battery. You
    want a square yard so that your elbows and forearms will usually be in
    contact with the anti-static surface. Circuit boards in modern drives
    are easy to replace because they're designed to simply slip into place
    and don't have any ribbon connectors with delicate clamps that are
    easy to break. On WD circuit boards there are some gold fingers near
    the motor, and there are 1 or 2 rows of very narrow contacts near the
    opposite side of the board. If the contacts on the new board don't
    line up in the same places, don't use the board. Do tighten all the
    screws (Torx -- get a Torx driver and don't try to use an ordinary
    screwdriver) before applying power because they're needed to secure
    the connectors and grounds.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    > I measured the AC voltage at the motor on the dead 80GB drive compared
    > to the functioning 40GB drive. I tested with IDE cables connected
    > then disconnected. The results were the same. The 40GB drive was
    > showing voltage while the 80GB drive was not. Looks like a dead
    > circuit board so far.
    >
    > I have an advance RMA from Western Digital on the way. From what I've
    > heard I will need a circuit board from the exact drive model that was
    > manufactured in the same month. What are the chances of being able to
    > successfully borrow the circuit board from the replacement drive that
    > is being shipped now just to retrieve my data?

    As soon as you pull the circuit board off the dead drive you don't have any
    warranty. Expect to have to pay for the replacement drive.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware (More info?)

    "Paul" <truerelaxation@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:7fabd546.0404271500.4ef68eab@posting.google.com...
    > do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me) wrote in message
    news:<101710fa.0404260147.157629e8@posting.google.com>...
    > > truerelaxation@yahoo.com (Paul) wrote in message
    news:<7fabd546.0404251835.183415cd@posting.google.com>...
    > >
    > > No editing of my quote? I didn't realize that my words were so
    > > concise and important. ;)
    > >
    > > > I have measured the voltage where the power connector attaches to the
    > > > circuit board. The voltages are as marked on the board, +5V and +12V.
    > > > I didn't measure the AC voltage. I thought about comparing it to the
    > > > 40GB drive but didn't do it yet. I did try to spin it up with the IDE
    > > > cable disconnected.
    > >
    > > You may want to measure voltages elsewhere on the circuit board, such
    > > as across any electrolytic capacitors (many are surface mount --
    > > yellow rectangular blocks colored silver at each end), but this can be
    > > difficult on a Western Digital drive since the components are on the
    > > inner side and require finding where the copper traces connect to the
    > > outer side. Generally, heavier traces indicate power and ground. Be
    > > very careful not to short traces together if you try to measure them.
    > >
    > > > I will measure the AC voltage to see how it compares to the 40GB
    > > > drive, try the freezer method and the quick 1/8th of a turn
    > > > procedure. If I don't have any luck with any of these I might
    > > > try to find a drive with the exact part number on ebay so I can
    > > > replace the circuit board.
    > > > The part number of the bad drive is WD800JB-00ETA0, manufactured
    > > > on September 16, 2003.
    > >
    > > Be careful about the freezer method because you don't want to cool the
    > > drive below its dew point since that can create shorts. It's safer to
    > > cool the drive for an hour or 2 in the refrigerator.
    >
    > I measured the AC voltage at the motor on the dead 80GB drive compared
    > to the functioning 40GB drive. I tested with IDE cables connected
    > then disconnected. The results were the same. The 40GB drive was
    > showing voltage while the 80GB drive was not. Looks like a dead
    > circuit board so far.
    >
    > I have an advance RMA from Western Digital on the way. From what I've
    > heard I will need a circuit board from the exact drive model that was
    > manufactured in the same month. What are the chances of being able to
    > successfully borrow the circuit board from the replacement drive that
    > is being shipped now just to retrieve my data?
    >
    > Are there any other potential gotchas? Can I fry anything? Is it a
    > pain to detatch the circuit board from the motor?

    At least 10 years ago I had a Seagate drive (200 MB!) that would not spin up
    reliably. Seagate's response was "Duh. That's really strange. We have
    never heard of that before." But that was wrong. According to several
    newsgroups, failing to spin up was a common problem with Seagate drives. I
    bought a good drive, played with power until it spun up, copied the drive to
    my new good drive, pitched the Seagate, and have never bought another from
    Seagate in all these years.
Ask a new question

Read More

Homebuilt Hardware Systems