What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest ..

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?

Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.

Thanks
19 answers Last reply
More about what quietest 80mm with highest
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "We Live For The One We Die For The One" <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote in
    message news:bnn69092umv8fd042vmfm3dou6sapn3csj@4ax.com...
    > What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    > Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    > Thanks
    Do you mean to ask, "What IS the ...."?
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 01 May 2004 18:25:27 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >
    >What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >
    >Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >
    >Thanks

    Perhaps the best way to achieve what you want:
    80mm to 92mm adapter
    http://store.yahoo.com/sidewindercomputers/al80to92fana.html
    92mm Panaflo High Speed
    http://sidewindercomputers.com/pa92hisp.html

    regards

    Dud
    --

    If we are what we eat. I'm cheap, fast, and easy.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 01 May 2004 18:25:27 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >
    >What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >
    >Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >
    >Thanks

    The large issue may be what minimal CFM your heatsink, ambient
    environment, etc, will allow. In general the two makes of fans with
    greatest CFM to noise ratio are Papst (sleeve-bearing models only) and
    Panaflo (hydrowave [proprietary sleeve also] which is very common compared
    to their rare ball bearing versions).

    So of the above two makes you need determine the CFM floor and choose the
    appropriate model. For "typical" use a Panaflow FBA08A12L1A should be a
    good, more cost-effective choice over the Papst. Often on the 'net
    they're simply referred to as an "L1A". In more extreme environment or
    for aggressive overclocking you might want the higher airflow
    FBA08A12M1A... see the trend? "M" for medium, "L" for low.

    Of course it also depends on the heatsink, a good 'sink will make it more
    likely you can use a low speed fan.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    I just want one to put on my Silent boost heatsink, IF the cooler on
    it is not as quiet as i want :)


    On Sat, 01 May 2004 20:44:49 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:

    >On Sat, 01 May 2004 18:25:27 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    ><Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >>
    >>Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >
    >The large issue may be what minimal CFM your heatsink, ambient
    >environment, etc, will allow. In general the two makes of fans with
    >greatest CFM to noise ratio are Papst (sleeve-bearing models only) and
    >Panaflo (hydrowave [proprietary sleeve also] which is very common compared
    >to their rare ball bearing versions).
    >
    >So of the above two makes you need determine the CFM floor and choose the
    >appropriate model. For "typical" use a Panaflow FBA08A12L1A should be a
    >good, more cost-effective choice over the Papst. Often on the 'net
    >they're simply referred to as an "L1A". In more extreme environment or
    >for aggressive overclocking you might want the higher airflow
    >FBA08A12M1A... see the trend? "M" for medium, "L" for low.
    >
    >Of course it also depends on the heatsink, a good 'sink will make it more
    >likely you can use a low speed fan.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sun, 02 May 2004 14:11:35 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >I just want one to put on my Silent boost heatsink, IF the cooler on
    >it is not as quiet as i want :)

    Silent Boost comes with a special ribbed Panaflo L1A. Wait till you get
    it then decide... there isn't much that's quieter than an L1A unless you
    use a fan speed controller or variable speed fan, which could be quieter
    but will VERY likely have a higher noise to airflow ratio, so louder for
    any particular level of cooling. Most people find the L1A plenty quiet,
    inaudible in a system having other case/video/psu/etc fans.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    No from what ive been reading, their are two versions of the silent
    boost, maybe the one with the HydroBearing has the Panaflow ?

    They say its 21db, HA HA, more like 26 fromt he reviews i read.

    Anyway we will see.

    Thanks.


    On Sun, 02 May 2004 07:53:44 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 02 May 2004 14:11:35 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    ><Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I just want one to put on my Silent boost heatsink, IF the cooler on
    >>it is not as quiet as i want :)
    >
    >Silent Boost comes with a special ribbed Panaflo L1A. Wait till you get
    >it then decide... there isn't much that's quieter than an L1A unless you
    >use a fan speed controller or variable speed fan, which could be quieter
    >but will VERY likely have a higher noise to airflow ratio, so louder for
    >any particular level of cooling. Most people find the L1A plenty quiet,
    >inaudible in a system having other case/video/psu/etc fans.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 03 May 2004 02:05:09 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >No from what ive been reading, their are two versions of the silent
    >boost, maybe the one with the HydroBearing has the Panaflow ?
    >
    >They say its 21db, HA HA, more like 26 fromt he reviews i read.
    >
    >Anyway we will see.
    >
    >Thanks.

    Both versions are for K7, socket A?
    If so, could you link to 2nd version without the Panaflo fan, perhaps a
    picture?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message news:<bnn69092umv8fd042vmfm3dou6sapn3csj@4ax.com>...
    > What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >
    > Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >
    > Thanks

    Zalman's and Vantec Stealth's are pretty quiet, but the airflow ain't
    too great. To get a good airflow you'll need to sacrifice some of the
    quietness.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Same Soket A CPUS, but one has a Hydrowave Bearing Fan the other has
    not, have alot at the www.thermaltake.com website just do a search for
    silent boost and you can see, the specs are the same, though for some
    reason just dirrerent modle number ?

    But people say the hydrowave is quieter for some reason.

    See ya.


    On Sun, 02 May 2004 17:41:08 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 03 May 2004 02:05:09 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    ><Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>No from what ive been reading, their are two versions of the silent
    >>boost, maybe the one with the HydroBearing has the Panaflow ?
    >>
    >>They say its 21db, HA HA, more like 26 fromt he reviews i read.
    >>
    >>Anyway we will see.
    >>
    >>Thanks.
    >
    >Both versions are for K7, socket A?
    >If so, could you link to 2nd version without the Panaflo fan, perhaps a
    >picture?
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 03 May 2004 13:27:20 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Same Soket A CPUS, but one has a Hydrowave Bearing Fan the other has
    >not, have alot at the www.thermaltake.com website just do a search for
    >silent boost and you can see, the specs are the same, though for some
    >reason just dirrerent modle number ?
    >
    >But people say the hydrowave is quieter for some reason.
    >
    >See ya.

    If I were guessing, my guess would be that whoever it was at Thermaltake
    that wrote one of those spec sheets for the website, also GUESSED. AFAIK
    that fan only comes in a hydrowave (sleeve) bearing version.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    | What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    |
    | Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.

    The best 'normal' HSF I know of are the ThermalTake temperature-controlled
    ones. When everything's cool the fan only turns slowly and it automatically
    speeds up when things get hot - so you get quiet operation as much as
    possible, but don't sacrifice really good cooling when you need it.
    ThermalTake stuff seems to be of very good quality but, as with most things,
    you pay for it. The fans they use are about an inch thick and are capable of
    shoving a fair old quantity of air. Exact spec will be on their web site,
    but I;ve used them on overclocked Thunderbird cores in the past and they did
    the job well.
    I've recently built three XP2400 systems - on Gigabyte GA-7VRXP m/boards -
    and taken a different approach. I gave the CoolerMaster 'Aero' HSFs a try
    and they are very good. They use a tangential fan, as opposed to the more
    usual axial type, which is able to generate a higher flow and pressure with
    less 'roaring' noise. Instead of having thermostatic temperature control,
    they come with a fan speed control and mounting plates for the front or rear
    of the case. The idea is that you adjust the fan speed for just enough
    cooling, but not more than you need - and therefore no more noise than
    necessary. The heat sink they come on is pretty good as well. A copper core
    for heat conduction, aluminium fans for low weight and good quality clips
    (three-hole) which is so important on socket-7 boards I find.
    If you are going to be running your CPU fan at less than full speed, make
    sure the trigger for your m/board fan speed alarm isn't set too high or it
    will be going off all the time.
    Kevin.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    I would email Thermaltake if i thought i woudl get a reply :)

    Might do it anyway see what happens, you email them as well :)

    Thanks.


    On Mon, 03 May 2004 04:28:08 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 03 May 2004 13:27:20 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The One
    ><Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Same Soket A CPUS, but one has a Hydrowave Bearing Fan the other has
    >>not, have alot at the www.thermaltake.com website just do a search for
    >>silent boost and you can see, the specs are the same, though for some
    >>reason just dirrerent modle number ?
    >>
    >>But people say the hydrowave is quieter for some reason.
    >>
    >>See ya.
    >
    >If I were guessing, my guess would be that whoever it was at Thermaltake
    >that wrote one of those spec sheets for the website, also GUESSED. AFAIK
    >that fan only comes in a hydrowave (sleeve) bearing version.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    My Pc is pretty quiet now all fans at 7 volts, but the CPU fan is 12
    volt :)

    With a Fan on the Side and Top you get that extra cooling without
    rsorting to 12 volt high CFM fans.

    Also if you lap the CPu heatsink does wonders, a pssive heatsink onthe
    northbridge and a Heatpipe cooler for your Vidcard and as silent as
    your going to get.

    My Athlon Xp 2400 is 39c at the momment theAmbient in the case is 19c
    though its pretty cold here today in Australia inside my place its 18c
    :)

    In summer i would expect it to be somthing like 55 60 at load, buts
    thats cool for a Xp2400 :)

    See ya.


    On 3 May 2004 10:06:22 -0700, petermcmillan_uk@yahoo.com (Peter)
    wrote:

    >We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message news:<bnn69092umv8fd042vmfm3dou6sapn3csj@4ax.com>...
    >> What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >>
    >> Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >
    >Zalman's and Vantec Stealth's are pretty quiet, but the airflow ain't
    >too great. To get a good airflow you'll need to sacrifice some of the
    >quietness.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    BULLSHIT ive got a thermaly controled Thermaltake fan and ITS LOUD.

    had it on my volcano 7, was loud then, and i tried it again and is
    still loud as a case fan.


    My Vantec AeroFlow is a better cooler that the Coolermaster, maybe my
    new Silent Boost will be even better ?

    See ya.


    On Mon, 3 May 2004 17:54:42 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote:

    >We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >| What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >|
    >| Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >
    >The best 'normal' HSF I know of are the ThermalTake temperature-controlled
    >ones. When everything's cool the fan only turns slowly and it automatically
    >speeds up when things get hot - so you get quiet operation as much as
    >possible, but don't sacrifice really good cooling when you need it.
    >ThermalTake stuff seems to be of very good quality but, as with most things,
    >you pay for it. The fans they use are about an inch thick and are capable of
    >shoving a fair old quantity of air. Exact spec will be on their web site,
    >but I;ve used them on overclocked Thunderbird cores in the past and they did
    >the job well.
    >I've recently built three XP2400 systems - on Gigabyte GA-7VRXP m/boards -
    >and taken a different approach. I gave the CoolerMaster 'Aero' HSFs a try
    >and they are very good. They use a tangential fan, as opposed to the more
    >usual axial type, which is able to generate a higher flow and pressure with
    >less 'roaring' noise. Instead of having thermostatic temperature control,
    >they come with a fan speed control and mounting plates for the front or rear
    >of the case. The idea is that you adjust the fan speed for just enough
    >cooling, but not more than you need - and therefore no more noise than
    >necessary. The heat sink they come on is pretty good as well. A copper core
    >for heat conduction, aluminium fans for low weight and good quality clips
    >(three-hole) which is so important on socket-7 boards I find.
    >If you are going to be running your CPU fan at less than full speed, make
    >sure the trigger for your m/board fan speed alarm isn't set too high or it
    >will be going off all the time.
    >Kevin.
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    | BULLSHIT ive got a thermaly controled Thermaltake fan and ITS LOUD.

    If it is noticeably loud (subjective, of course) then it would be
    interesting to know what rpm it is running at and what temp you're seeing.
    Obviously you'll hear it if it is running at full speed as any axial fan
    will make a roaring noise due to the turbulance from the air rolling off the
    tips of the fan blades. If it is loud at a low rpm when things are quite
    cool (all subjective again, I know) then maybe there is a problem with it ?

    | had it on my volcano 7, was loud then, and i tried it again and is
    | still loud as a case fan.

    At full rpm you can expect to hear any 'normal' design of axial fan. The
    advantage of a thermally controlled one is that it shouldn't be running at
    full rpm most of the time so it will be quieter.

    | My Vantec AeroFlow is a better cooler that the Coolermaster, maybe my
    | new Silent Boost will be even better ?

    I've no experience of the Vantec as yet, but the design appears to avoid the
    blade-tip turbulence so I would expect it to be quieter. I'll have to get a
    couple and give them a try as they look like a good idea. Less noise and no
    bearing maintenance must surely be a good thing.
    Thanks for the recommendation.
    Kevin.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    FWIW I added a blowhole to my PSU, just above my CPU, and added
    Zalman ZM-OP1 fan to the hole. With it running on 5V I saw my CPU
    diode temp drop by 5C. Also I was able to reduce the fan RPM on the
    heatsink (Zalman Cu6000).

    I have an Antec 92mm fan over the heatsink and a Panflo L1A on the
    rear case with a Thermaltake 120mm (running at 5V) on the front.

    Diode reports 53C using a XP2200

    The PC is very quiet and underload it never goes above 55C on the
    diode.

    cheers

    Harry


    On Sat, 01 May 2004 18:25:27 +1000, We Live For The One We Die For The
    One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

    >
    >
    >What would be the quietest 80mm fan with with the highest CFM ?
    >
    >Need one for my heatsink, xp2400.
    >
    >Thanks
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Ny Vantec is Quiet but not silent not anoying but ok, still want less
    noise though.


    On Tue, 4 May 2004 17:23:19 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:

    >We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >| BULLSHIT ive got a thermaly controled Thermaltake fan and ITS LOUD.
    >
    >If it is noticeably loud (subjective, of course) then it would be
    >interesting to know what rpm it is running at and what temp you're seeing.
    >Obviously you'll hear it if it is running at full speed as any axial fan
    >will make a roaring noise due to the turbulance from the air rolling off the
    >tips of the fan blades. If it is loud at a low rpm when things are quite
    >cool (all subjective again, I know) then maybe there is a problem with it ?
    >
    >| had it on my volcano 7, was loud then, and i tried it again and is
    >| still loud as a case fan.
    >
    >At full rpm you can expect to hear any 'normal' design of axial fan. The
    >advantage of a thermally controlled one is that it shouldn't be running at
    >full rpm most of the time so it will be quieter.
    >
    >| My Vantec AeroFlow is a better cooler that the Coolermaster, maybe my
    >| new Silent Boost will be even better ?
    >
    >I've no experience of the Vantec as yet, but the design appears to avoid the
    >blade-tip turbulence so I would expect it to be quieter. I'll have to get a
    >couple and give them a try as they look like a good idea. Less noise and no
    >bearing maintenance must surely be a good thing.
    >Thanks for the recommendation.
    >Kevin.
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    | Ny Vantec is Quiet but not silent not anoying but ok, still want less
    | noise though.

    The Vantec seems to be an interesting engineering solution and I'm looking
    forward to trying one out. I reckon that the fan design will be good as a
    case intake fan also.
    I've read some reviews of the ThermalTake SlentBoost and I am surprised by
    their claim that the 'vented' fan cage is able to give quieter running. I
    would have expected it to increase turbulence so I guess it is another one
    I'm going to have to try. Interesting is the fact that Panaflow rate the
    bare fan as 28 dbA, though ThermalTake quote 21 dbA. I would have thought
    that coupling the fan to the heatsink would increase the noise level, not
    reduce it. I guess the low noise levels are acheived by having a fan which
    only runs at 2450 rpm - certainly the not-so-good cooling, even with a
    copper heatsink, would bear this out. Also, from its shape, I'd imagine that
    it might not be too easy to mount and dismount. With so many m/boards
    placing the CPU quite close to the PSU in a standard tower case I think this
    can be quite important.
    At least we have a choice.
    Kevin.

    | On Tue, 4 May 2004 17:23:19 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    | <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:
    |
    || We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    ||| BULLSHIT ive got a thermaly controled Thermaltake fan and ITS LOUD.
    ||
    || If it is noticeably loud (subjective, of course) then it would be
    || interesting to know what rpm it is running at and what temp you're
    || seeing. Obviously you'll hear it if it is running at full speed as
    || any axial fan will make a roaring noise due to the turbulance from
    || the air rolling off the tips of the fan blades. If it is loud at a
    || low rpm when things are quite cool (all subjective again, I know)
    || then maybe there is a problem with it ?
    ||
    ||| had it on my volcano 7, was loud then, and i tried it again and is
    ||| still loud as a case fan.
    ||
    || At full rpm you can expect to hear any 'normal' design of axial fan.
    || The advantage of a thermally controlled one is that it shouldn't be
    || running at full rpm most of the time so it will be quieter.
    ||
    ||| My Vantec AeroFlow is a better cooler that the Coolermaster, maybe
    ||| my
    ||| new Silent Boost will be even better ?
    ||
    || I've no experience of the Vantec as yet, but the design appears to
    || avoid the blade-tip turbulence so I would expect it to be quieter.
    || I'll have to get a couple and give them a try as they look like a
    || good idea. Less noise and no bearing maintenance must surely be a
    || good thing.
    || Thanks for the recommendation.
    || Kevin.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 5 May 2004 10:47:38 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:

    >We Live For The One We Die For The One <Mr fred@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
    >| Ny Vantec is Quiet but not silent not anoying but ok, still want less
    >| noise though.
    >
    >The Vantec seems to be an interesting engineering solution and I'm looking
    >forward to trying one out. I reckon that the fan design will be good as a
    >case intake fan also.

    Thermally controlled fans aren't too good for case intake, generally to
    change RPM they need significantly higher than ambient temp. Too often
    that's the problem with any thermally controlled fan, their RPM to temp
    response isn't very good.

    >I've read some reviews of the ThermalTake SlentBoost and I am surprised by
    >their claim that the 'vented' fan cage is able to give quieter running. I
    >would have expected it to increase turbulence so I guess it is another one
    >I'm going to have to try.

    Basically what it does is increase air intake area. not a huge difference
    and perhaps not even significant on a heatsink since that design would
    tend to recirculate slightly more of the 'sink exhaust air.

    >Interesting is the fact that Panaflow rate the
    >bare fan as 28 dbA, though ThermalTake quote 21 dbA. I would have thought
    >that coupling the fan to the heatsink would increase the noise level, not
    >reduce it.

    Major fan manufacturer's specs can be believed but Thermaltake (as with
    most low to mid-range product manufacturers) seems to intentionally
    deviate from industry standard measurement to produce deceptive (false)
    information. It's bad enough when manufacturers claim noise level only
    based on what the fan would produce in free air instead of mounted on the
    'sink, but Thermaltake goes one step worse in their spec.

    >I guess the low noise levels are acheived by having a fan which
    >only runs at 2450 rpm - certainly the not-so-good cooling, even with a
    >copper heatsink, would bear this out.

    That is Panaflo's mid-speed fan. As with noise levels you may find "some"
    fans' specs with false, padded airflow numbers. That fan on any decent
    mid-range heatsink is enough to cool an Athlon XP3200. That fan on a
    high-end heatsink is enough to cool any Socket A chip as high as it can be
    reasonably overclocked. The non-vented Panaflo M1A version I have has
    been cooling a T'Bred @ 2.5GHz for almost a year.

    Panaflo fans really are the best choice out there unless you absolutely
    MUST have thermal control. M1A isn't loud enough to be too concerned
    about it though, and if noise is really that much of an issue there's
    always the L1A, low speed version.


    >Also, from its shape, I'd imagine that
    >it might not be too easy to mount and dismount. With so many m/boards
    >placing the CPU quite close to the PSU in a standard tower case I think this
    >can be quite important.
    >At least we have a choice.
    >Kevin.

    Better to have a big 'sink and fan that's harder to mount than a small
    'sink that's easy... shouldn't be needing to mount/dismount it too often
    anyway. It fits within AMD's keepout zone so it should always fit on a
    board... main issue would be if socket lugs are positioned on top and
    bottom of socket rather than sides, in which case it's a lot easier to use
    a custom tool to attach the 'sink clip (like a bent screwdriver). The
    right tools can really make a difference, make it safter and save a lot of
    time.
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