Is thermal paste included on Retail AMD Heatsink

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Hello,

Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Reail, that is the fan and heatsink are
included.

Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on heatsink already, or
do I need to buy it separatelly?

Thanks
10 answers Last reply
More about thermal paste included retail heatsink
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 15 Jun 2004 18:59:37 GMT, "Ben" <ben@ben.com> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Reail, that is the fan and heatsink are
    >included.
    >
    >Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on heatsink already, or
    >do I need to buy it separatelly?
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >

    No thermal paste, but the standard heatsink has a thermal pad. It's
    more than adequate if you don't intend to overclock -- though some may
    recommend that you scrape it off immediately and replace it with
    paste, I just don't see anypoint in wasting it.

    If you have to remove the heatsink for some reason though, scraping
    off the pad remnents and replacing it with paste is a good idea.


    ---------------------------------------------

    MCheu
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "MCheu" wrote:
    > "Ben" wrote:
    >
    > >Hello,
    > >
    > >Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Reail, that is the fan and heatsink are
    > >included.
    > >
    > >Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on heatsink already, or
    > >do I need to buy it separatelly?
    > >
    > >Thanks
    > >
    > >
    >
    > No thermal paste, but the standard heatsink has a thermal pad. It's
    > more than adequate if you don't intend to overclock -- though some may
    > recommend that you scrape it off immediately and replace it with
    > paste, I just don't see anypoint in wasting it.
    >
    > If you have to remove the heatsink for some reason though, scraping
    > off the pad remnents and replacing it with paste is a good idea.

    In addition to this, keep in mind that operating the processor without the factory supplied TIM will void
    your warranty.

    Jon
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Ben wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Retail, that is the fan and
    > heatsink are included.
    >
    > Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on heatsink
    > already, or do I need to buy it separatelly?


    The fan, heatsink, and processor are included in the retail package. On the
    bottom of the heatsink is TIM, thermal interface material. Remove the
    protective plastic strip and install the heatsink. Heat produced by the CPU
    during operation will melt the TIM and provide a good interface between the
    die of the CPU and the heatsink.

    If you plan to remove the heatsink any time soon, remove the thermal pad
    with the edge of a credit card or your fingernail. Clean the surface with
    99% isopropyl alcohol. Apply a translucent layer of thermal paste. Attach
    the heatsink.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 15 Jun 2004 18:59:37 GMT, "Ben" <ben@ben.com> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Reail, that is the fan and heatsink are
    >included.
    >
    >Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on heatsink already, or
    >do I need to buy it separatelly?
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >

    You do not need to buy any, it comes with.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ben" <ben@ben.com> wrote in message news:<tGHzc.26175$Fd.8486@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com>...

    > Im about to buy a AMD Athlon 2800+ Reail, that is the fan
    > and heatsink are included.
    >
    > Does anyone know if there will be some thermal paste on
    > heatsink already, or do I need to buy it separatelly?

    It comes with everything you need, and the retail Athlons I've bought
    and every replacement heatsink they've sent me (bad fans -- they sent
    me both the fan and heatsink anyway) all had a layer of phase-change
    material applied to them that looked sort of like clay and is supposed
    to turn from solid to liquid (thick liquid, doesn't run) at around
    50-60C.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    AMD's web site recommends you use their thermal pad
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Alex Andra" <bogus@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    news:ToadnYgB19y8903dRVn-uw@comcast.com...

    " AMD's web site recommends you use their thermal pad. "


    Do you remember that line in 'Fight Club' ? *A new car built by my company
    leaves somewhere travelling at 60 mph. The rear differential locks up. The
    car crashes and burns with everyone trapped inside. Now, should we initiate
    a recall? You take the number of vehicles in the field, A, multiply by the
    probable rate of failure, B, multiply by the average out-of-court
    settlement, C. A times B times C equals X. If X is less than the cost of a
    recall, we don't do one.*

    AMD will always 'recommend' thermal pads for their own business reasons.
    Temperatures will be higher with thermal pads, but there is much less room
    for application error. AMD's position probably stands like this:

    A CPU made by our company runs cooler with thermal paste. However, the
    potential for ruining the warrantied CPU is greater than with a thermal pad,
    as a number of retards will apply the whole sachet of thermal paste. You
    take the number of CPUs in the field, A, multiply by the probable rate of
    replacement, B, multiply by the average replacement cost, C. A times B
    times C equals X. If the cost of X is greater for CPUs with thermal paste
    than for CPUs with thermal pads, we don't advise thermal paste.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Cuzman wrote:
    > "Alex Andra" <bogus@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    > news:ToadnYgB19y8903dRVn-uw@comcast.com...
    >
    > " AMD's web site recommends you use their thermal pad. "
    >
    >
    > Do you remember that line in 'Fight Club' ? *A new car built by my company
    > leaves somewhere travelling at 60 mph. The rear differential locks up. The
    > car crashes and burns with everyone trapped inside. Now, should we initiate
    > a recall? You take the number of vehicles in the field, A, multiply by the
    > probable rate of failure, B, multiply by the average out-of-court
    > settlement, C. A times B times C equals X. If X is less than the cost of a
    > recall, we don't do one.*
    >
    > AMD will always 'recommend' thermal pads for their own business reasons.
    > Temperatures will be higher with thermal pads, but there is much less room
    > for application error. AMD's position probably stands like this:
    >
    > A CPU made by our company runs cooler with thermal paste. However, the
    > potential for ruining the warrantied CPU is greater than with a thermal pad,
    > as a number of retards will apply the whole sachet of thermal paste. You
    > take the number of CPUs in the field, A, multiply by the probable rate of
    > replacement, B, multiply by the average replacement cost, C. A times B
    > times C equals X. If the cost of X is greater for CPUs with thermal paste
    > than for CPUs with thermal pads, we don't advise thermal paste.
    >
    >
    >

    That's an interesting theory but it doesn't explain why computer
    manufacturers, with their trained personnel, as opposed to 'retards', use
    thermal pads.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Why not just use Superglue? Sure would bond the two very tightly :)
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    TANKIE wrote:

    > Why not just use Superglue? Sure would bond the two very tightly :)

    Perhaps, if the purpose was to glue them together.
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