How much pressure on the heatskink retention clip

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Im trying to install my heatsink (amd athlon 2800+) and I'm having some
problems with the retention clip.

It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the way
is not symetrical) that it will almost certainly damage the processor (or
mobo).
Does it usually take that much force to install it or am I missing
something?

Thanks
6 answers Last reply
More about pressure heatskink retention clip
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ben" <ben@ben.com> writes:
    >Im trying to install my heatsink (amd athlon 2800+) and I'm having some
    >problems with the retention clip.

    >It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the way
    >is not symetrical) that it will almost certainly damage the processor (or
    >mobo).
    >Does it usually take that much force to install it or am I missing
    >something?

    If this is the retail package version from AMD then you are having about
    the same experience that I had. I was up on top of the table with leaning
    on a screwdriver to apply pressure to the little button to try to get it
    to seat. The screwdriver slipped off the button once and I was amazed it
    didn't punch a hole through the circuitboard.

    In the end I carefully aligned everything, REALLY leaned on it to push
    the clip down AND used a second screwdriver to pry the edge of the clip
    away from the little plastic hook on the socket. That way there was no
    need for the sharp clip to cut its way down the edge of the hook. When
    I had enough pressure to push the clip past the edge of the hook I let
    the second screwdriver relax and the clip slipped into place.

    Must easily be ten pounds force on that little square cm of cpu, double
    during the process of trying to get it to latch. I'd think half inch
    bolts and a torque wrench would be a safer method to apply it.

    On an earlier board I used a Vantec Aeroflow and it went on easily.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the
    way
    > is not symetrical) that it will almost certainly damage the processor (or
    > mobo).

    It DOES take a lot of force to install. You aren't doing anything wrong.
    Just make sure the mobo is on a flat surface, preferrably with the end
    you're installing the HSF onto an inch or two off the end of a table, so
    that you don't bend the mobo during installation.

    And yes, the clip is asymmetrical by design. Refer to the instructions it
    will tell you which end goes on which end of the mobo. What you should be
    doing is with the HSF slightly on an angle, hook the first side onto the
    "inside" side mobo, then as the HSF becomes flat, the other end of the clip
    will be on the "outside" and you can push down while holding your thumbs
    underneath the end of the mobo.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ben" wrote:
    > Im trying to install my heatsink (amd athlon 2800+) and I'm having some
    > problems with the retention clip.
    >
    > It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the way
    > is not symetrical)....

    The clip is asymmetrical by design; if you look at where the pressure is applied, though, you will see
    that it is squarely in the center of where the CPU is.

    Jon
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <td_Bc.9$9l5.8@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com>, Ben says...
    > Im trying to install my heatsink (amd athlon 2800+) and I'm having some
    > problems with the retention clip.
    >
    > It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the way
    > is not symetrical) that it will almost certainly damage the processor (or
    > mobo).
    > Does it usually take that much force to install it or am I missing
    > something?
    >
    Some can be damned hard to fit.


    --
    Conor

    Dumb as a box of rocks...
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 17:43:53 GMT, "Ben" <ben@ben.com> wrote:

    >Im trying to install my heatsink (amd athlon 2800+) and I'm having some
    >problems with the retention clip.

    The retail packaged chip, heatsink, or 3rd party and if so, which 'sink?

    >It seems like I will have to put so much force on the clip (which by the way
    >is not symetrical) that it will almost certainly damage the processor (or
    >mobo).
    >Does it usually take that much force to install it or am I missing
    >something?

    It is a good thing for it to have a lot of force, that helps to keep
    interface very thin and squeeze out excess TIM when it heats up and melts.
    However, it certainly wouldn't be impossible for you to have received a
    clip that is defective, and would require too much force. If you had
    prior experience with same 'sink you would have a reference point, but
    since you don't, all we can offer is that, yes, it takes a lot of force to
    install it.

    Hold the heatsink flat upon the CPU core while clipping it down, not
    slanted which puts excessive force on the side of the core. Use the right
    sized tool, and take your time. If you can't get good access to it (and
    the motherboard is mounted in the case already), by all means, take the
    board out of the case if it's helpful to do so. Putting some plastic on
    the board, under the socket clip area, while installing can also help if a
    tool were to slip, taped down with masking tap, or whatever alternate
    method is easy to implement. That's not really necessary, just safer in a
    difficult installation or for a first-time installer.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    A few notes when using the screwdriver-v-motherboard russian-roullette:
    o Use as broad a screwdriver as will fit re stability
    o Don't use a screwdriver I've used to open paint tins
    ---- you need to have a parallel square tip, not one bent or broken or...
    o Put tape on the PCB in case you do slip
    ---- surface mount capacitors etc are cleaned off by flying screwdrivers
    o Sometimes tape on the tip of the screwdriver can help
    ---- it reduces the chance of it slipping out on some clip designs

    There are specs on retention force, and I do recall that the tolerance on
    the clips can be a bit variable - some can require quite excessive force.
    --
    Dorothy Bradbury
    www.stores.ebay.co.uk/panaflofan for quiet fans, books & other items
    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/dorothy.bradbury/panaflo.htm (Direct)
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