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Apple Ditches Green Manufacturing Standard for Products

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July 10, 2012 3:08:28 AM

So many companies around the world are taking extra steps to reduce their environmental impact, not Apple. Yet, I picture so many hipsters talking how much they care about the planet holding their iPhones they so dearly treasure.
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July 10, 2012 3:13:34 AM

Right, since when did Apple even consider practices that could hurt their quarterly budget reports?
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July 10, 2012 3:17:27 AM

The explanation is really quite simple. Apples products are all about sleek design; love 'em or hate em, the outward appearance of their products has always been a hallmark. In order to achieve the cutting edge look that they are after, and get everything to fit into the chassis and sill function, is tough enough without having to meet another standard for being all modular and "green".
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July 10, 2012 3:20:36 AM

Seems like apple wants to go to all out "thermonuclear war" with the planet. And who says Steve legacy is fading?
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July 10, 2012 3:22:48 AM

What u expect from company that only interested in increasing their profit margins ?
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July 10, 2012 3:25:14 AM

I disagree with their decision but am not surprised about it. I've ragged on Apple in the past about their clean outward appearance and lack of an environmentally friendly manufacturing and product recycling system. Plenty of their competitors are able to do it. It seems like a selfish thing for the recently "most valuable company" in the world to not bother worrying about their impact on the planet.

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July 10, 2012 3:31:07 AM

huskerThe explanation is really quite simple. Apples products are all about sleek design; love 'em or hate em, the outward appearance of their products has always been a hallmark. In order to achieve the cutting edge look that they are after, and get everything to fit into the chassis and sill function, is tough enough without having to meet another standard for being all modular and "green".


They don't need non-repairability for their sleek design, look at the Ultrabooks and Sleekbooks.

They're doing it because they want a monopoly on repair services and prevent users from upgrading, thus forcing them to pay more for better laptops and replace their laptops more frequently.
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July 10, 2012 3:31:49 AM

It continues to baffle me that people think Apple is such a great company. I swear it seems like some kind of large scale quasi-stockholm syndrome...
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July 10, 2012 3:48:24 AM

kutarkIt continues to baffle me that people think Apple is such a great company. I swear it seems like some kind of large scale quasi-stockholm syndrome...


I feel the same way when something is labeled "green" or "environmental". People are always tricked into believe that's good.
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July 10, 2012 3:51:31 AM

i still wouldn't buy apple even if they did meet EPEAT standards
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July 10, 2012 4:00:16 AM

kitekrazy1963I feel the same way when something is labeled "green" or "environmental". People are always tricked into believe that's good.
Please do explain how EPEAT is a bad thing.
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July 10, 2012 4:07:37 AM

EPEAT standards was a gimmick to get old people to buy the product...what a shame
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July 10, 2012 4:15:01 AM

kitekrazy1963I feel the same way when something is labeled "green" or "environmental". People are always tricked into believe that's good.


Nice try apple fan.

Any person with a half a brain knows how much of a ripoff Apple products are.
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July 10, 2012 4:39:11 AM

KyuuketsukiPlease do explain how EPEAT is a bad thing.


*Puts on a CEO's hat*

It hurts our shareholders' earnings. Now shut up, I need that gold-plated yacht and diamond studded iPhone.
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July 10, 2012 5:00:54 AM

I wonder which of the major laptop manufacturers will be the first to follow the 'integrated and non replaceable parts' scheme? I believe ssd's will soon join that list.
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July 10, 2012 5:11:03 AM

The Wall Street Journal had a great article about this two days ago... http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/07/06/apple-removes-green...

1. Tom's news is slowly falling to the wayside on being timely.

2. Gluing batteries to the case and making ultra thin screens make the Retina Macbook's not meet the EPEAT standards.
The desire to cram so much into such a little space made them sacrifice the disassembly of their laptops.

3. Apple has a recycling program where they give you money to trade in your old device so they can recycle it: http://www.apple.com/recycling/

4. I'd like to see the recycling programs of Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc...
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July 10, 2012 5:12:28 AM

I think some schools and government agencies require that rating to be approved purchases. Nice work.
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July 10, 2012 5:25:10 AM

I really don't give a rat's ass about a product's "environmental friendly" rate, Apple products are still shit be it they're eco-friendly or not.
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July 10, 2012 5:29:31 AM

pharoahhalfdeadI wonder which of the major laptop manufacturers will be the first to follow the 'integrated and non replaceable parts' scheme? I believe ssd's will soon join that list.


I don't think SSDs are meant to be disassembled. It's essentially one big circuit-board with some controller and flash chips and a SATA/PCI-E connector.
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July 10, 2012 5:41:36 AM

A Bad DayI don't think SSDs are meant to be disassembled. It's essentially one big circuit-board with some controller and flash chips and a SATA/PCI-E connector.

Everything is soldered on!
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July 10, 2012 6:00:32 AM

ttcboyWhat u expect from company that only interested in increasing their profit margins ?


You can say that for every publicly traded company. Shareholders always demand growth and profit. If you had your most profitable year, the next year better continue the trend and be even better or the CEO might be in trouble.
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July 10, 2012 6:51:14 AM

thatguychuckI think some schools and government agencies require that rating to be approved purchases. Nice work.

sundragonThe Wall Street Journal had a great article about this two days ago... http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/07/0 [...] -products/1. Tom's news is slowly falling to the wayside on being timely.2. Gluing batteries to the case and making ultra thin screens make the Retina Macbook's not meet the EPEAT standards.The desire to cram so much into such a little space made them sacrifice the disassembly of their laptops.3. Apple has a recycling program where they give you money to trade in your old device so they can recycle it: http://www.apple.com/recycling/4. I'd like to see the recycling programs of Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc...


They will give you back in only Apple gift cards.
Plus for a fully working, non damaged in anyway with the power cord supplied you get only 285 dollars in Apple money.
That's a massive rip off.
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July 10, 2012 6:55:17 AM

Not like I ever cared about green standards, but Apple's reason for withdrawing isn't very logical, I mean I would understand if they wanted to include components with extremely high TDP or if they wanted production efficiency, but no, their reason is because they want to cram more stuff into a smaller space, once again, you can't do that, even ultrabooks have some degree of repairability! It just makes little sense to me is all I'm saying.
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July 10, 2012 8:52:35 AM

ttcboyWhat u expect from company that only interested in increasing their profit margins ?


It's so unbelievable. All other companies have completely different goals.... oh wait.. they don't.
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July 10, 2012 9:12:43 AM

Quote:
...punctured the battery "leaking hazardous goo all over." And these are professionals with oodles of experiences, tools, and lab space.


Probably because they were in a hurry. I've seen it myself with PSP's (the famous Pandora battery). Never underestimate the eagerness of an IT geek.

I think Apple did a marketing research and asked people what they thought of environmentally-friendly products. And most of them probably didn't give enough of a sh*t.

Latte-sipping hipsters... unite!
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July 10, 2012 10:10:55 AM

Repair-ability and longevity are two characteristics that specifically interest me. Please pardon the buzzwords, but rampant consumerism is not sustainable, in ANY sense. As global economies tank, people aren't going to have the money to keep buying and buying and buying more and more junk. We're running out of resources and people to exploit to make it, and places to exploit to dump it. Maintaining a business on the formerly-successful planned obsolescence/perceived obsolescence model is [fortunately] doomed to failure.
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July 10, 2012 10:20:41 AM

huskerThe explanation is really quite simple. Apples products are all about sleek design; love 'em or hate em, the outward appearance of their products has always been a hallmark. In order to achieve the cutting edge look that they are after, and get everything to fit into the chassis and sill function, is tough enough without having to meet another standard for being all modular and "green".

In other words, Apple's stance is "frick this green stuff, let your kids deal with it when it comes to it; now we want more money."
Besides, more money means they'll be able to buy themselves out of this planet, right? Plenty of other planets to live on out there, right?
RIGHT?
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July 10, 2012 10:29:54 AM

demarestNot a big deal really. If I never hear the word "green" again, it will be too soon. I recently upgraded my computer and hand picked parts with lower power consumption. Not because of some insane belief that we as a race can doom or save a planet much larger than all humans that ever existed combined. People who assign a label to the practice of doing something with more efficiency (green) are doing so out of self-righteousness.Speaking of self-righteousness, I take issue with the article's use of "we all know" and "oodles." I hate to say it, but I'm seeing more and more examples of articles on tom's that are not serious journalistic endeavors. That makes me a sad panda.

And yet, you chose to do the right thing because... I know I do it because it's the right thing to do, not necessarily the green thing to do.
Funny how people that choose the gas-guzzling vehicles (just an example) and taunt the ones that choose a fuel-efficient vehicle are the same ones that choose to have quite a few children in their ever-growing families. If they don't care about their own kids and the world they leave for them, why would the rest of us?
As for companies that go "green", that's actually more important than individual choices, because their footprint is so much larger than mine or yours. If you choose to make the right choice (even if you hate the word "green"), it still won't make such a great impact as if an entire company does it.
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July 10, 2012 10:29:55 AM

i wasted lots of Money on Apple gear, it was fun. Now I can say I enjoyed their products but will be buying a lot less of them in the future. Guess what? Apple couldn't care less and that's just fine. Its called reality.
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July 10, 2012 11:25:17 AM

Wait Apple manufacturing / products was green? I though it was blood red.
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July 10, 2012 1:37:28 PM

EPEAT just isnt "cool" or "stylish" enough to have apples name in their registry.
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July 10, 2012 1:55:57 PM

Wow Apple, lets make a new standard, "the Apple standard". It's 2012 and all companies should have a moral and ethical responsibility to be as environmentally friendly as possible. As disposable electronics pile up in land fills we will be consumed by trash. Every effort should be made in order to allow materials to be easily recycled. Welcome to the real Idiocracy (movie reference).

Here is my standard. If I can't easily replace the battery, I won't buy it. Plain and simple. I have been in IT my whole life and do most of my own electronic device repairs. If I can't do somethings as simple as a battery replacement on a device, I don't want it. I understand integrating components, but what can you really integrate a power source into? Nothing!
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July 10, 2012 1:57:10 PM

Seems like Apple has decided to buck the "green trend" for lowering production costs. Given the Apple user base, this direction is sure to tick off many Apple users. Just might be the incentive for them to look elsewhere for their computing needs.

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July 10, 2012 2:01:12 PM

Been saying this since the very first iPod - they are not designed to be user friendly for people trying to repair these things. You know how many paper weight iPod's I've dealt with. Another reason not to buy apple
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July 10, 2012 2:15:34 PM

oh yes, no longevity standards. Your iphone 5 will last '5' minutes on idle. double the bottom line by reducing mtbf.
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July 10, 2012 2:32:16 PM

Let's see those loyalists defend Apple in this regard now.
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July 10, 2012 2:51:15 PM

jacekring5) I'm just waiting for the zombie apocalypse. I've stocked up on guns and ammo, just gota wait out the lull before the zombies run amok.

YES! Me to... That or until we are all drinking Brawndo, The Thirst Mutilator.
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July 10, 2012 3:10:09 PM

sundragonI'd like to see the recycling programs of Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc...
While I don't know about those particular companies, but HP sponsors a recycling program at my store for electronics (and we take any brand, including Mac). The thing is, we have to be able to pull the battery for a separate bin, so we can't take things like unibody MacBooks. Re: "since when did special screws stop someone who wanted to open hardware" - since our store needs any random cashier to be able to just pull the battery and bin it appropriately and get right back to work. We're not going to make a project of disassembling an unfriendly machine.
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July 10, 2012 3:31:53 PM

lol some apple fan boy has gone and disliked every comment against this decision by Apple hahaha
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July 10, 2012 5:51:46 PM

Why am I not surprised... building green cost money, ergo reduces profit margins.
Apple has no idea what corporate responsibility means; they are just a bunch of anti-siocal misfits with very deep pockets; now go and join the Oil 'manufacturers' club!

Thanks for adding yet another reason not to buy or use any of your products.
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July 10, 2012 6:13:53 PM

hmm so the hipster computer (which isn't a PC lol ya right whatever) isn't green any longer? go figure...
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July 10, 2012 7:15:42 PM

killerclickYou can say that for every publicly traded company. Shareholders always demand growth and profit. If you had your most profitable year, the next year better continue the trend and be even better or the CEO might be in trouble.


If by being in trouble you mean they might be fired and given a severance package that would keep them living comfortably for their entire life on top of having a yearly income that would allow them to live comfortably for their entire life then yes they would surely be in trouble. First world problems.

Leave it to Apple fans to still try and justify this. They have to solder the battery in and use special screws to take up less space? I wasn't aware that philips head screws take up such a large amount of space compared to a different bit. Apple is truly the pioneer of screws that defy normal physics.

Batteries are pretty frequently replaced in laptops. There is both a decent failure rate and a factor of inevitable weardown of the cells regardless of care and precaution. That is why laptops are traditionally designed with batteries that are not only removeable but EASILY removeable. Any battery failure on these devices means complete replacement. Not like I expect Apple zealots to care, considering they buy the newest product every year anyway and have likely never used the devices long enough to need a new battery.
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July 10, 2012 7:30:12 PM

sundragonThe Wall Street Journal had a great article about this two days ago... http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/07/0 [...] -products/2. Gluing batteries to the case and making ultra thin screens make the Retina Macbook's not meet the EPEAT standards.The desire to cram so much into such a little space made them sacrifice the disassembly of their laptops.[\citation]
funny, according to the article you mentioned, it's because they are no longer easily recyclable without hazard to the recycler. . .

"In order to meet the standards, recyclers need to be able to easily disassemble products, with common tools, to separate toxic components, like batteries." and recyclers can no longer do this easily because they're fused to the case. . .

However, for other companies, who are cramming just as much into just as small a package (or very similarly sized packages) they're still doing it with a mind toward recycling. . .
3. Apple has a recycling program where they give you money to trade in your old device so they can recycle it: http://www.apple.com/recycling/4. I'd like to see the recycling programs of Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, etc...


True, Apple has a recycling program - but what do they do with the old computers? They go to recyclers who can no longer easily disassemble the components, separating out the hazardous (like the batteries) from the easily recycled (like the case). . .

Lenovo's recycling program - http://www.lenovo.com/social_responsibility/us/en/produ...
Asus' recycling program - http://campuslife.asus.com/index/5284/how-to-recycle-yo...

Strangely, all I had to do was to put the company name and "recycling program" into Google and Bing (just to make sure it really WAS that easy) and lo. . . first links were to the company recycling programs. . . Who woulda thought it?
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July 10, 2012 8:38:57 PM

You know who is rolling over in his grave right now.
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July 10, 2012 10:02:35 PM

I think it has something to do with Apple's current lawsuit with the earth.
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July 10, 2012 10:48:41 PM

It's interesting that most treehugging liberals love Apple products. Most old-fashioned greedy capitalists love regular ol' PCs. Yet PCs are far more environmentally friendly. Go figure...
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July 10, 2012 11:57:45 PM

v3rlonand the same folks that bash hem for being treehuggers now bash them for not being green enough. EPEAT also said that even MBAs and MBPro Retina qualified for EPEAT, and the older MBPros did anyway. Apple is deciding to withdraw from this standard for whatever reason, but it does not make them more or less Green. And when did special screws stop anyone who really wanted at the hardware?

It's the fact that the newer models are non-repairable and non-recyclable that makes them "less green"....and less environmentally friendly.
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!