Generic IDE Disk Types 47 and 80

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

My PC had a single disk identified in Device Manager as a Generic IDE
disk type 47, which was my C drive. I added a new disk on the secondary
controller which became my D drive. I then copied an image across and
switched the IDE cables over so my new disk was on the primary channel
and became my C drive and the old disk then went on the secondary
channel and became my D drive.

I have just looked in device manager again and I have noticed that the C
drive is still identified as Generic IDE disk type 47 while the original
disk, now D, is identified as Generic IDE disk type 80 rather than the
47 it used to be.

Can anyone tell me what it means? Google has revealed nothing to me.
Should I somehow be trying to get my C drive redesignated as a type 80
and my old D drive as an 47? If so, how? Or should I not worry?

Many thanks,

Nick.
4 answers Last reply
More about generic disk types
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    >Or should I not worry?

    If it aint broke, dont try to fix it untill it is.

    hamman
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Nick H wrote:

    > My PC had a single disk identified in Device Manager as a Generic IDE
    > disk type 47, which was my C drive. I added a new disk on the secondary
    > controller which became my D drive. I then copied an image across and
    > switched the IDE cables over so my new disk was on the primary channel
    > and became my C drive and the old disk then went on the secondary
    > channel and became my D drive.
    >
    > I have just looked in device manager again and I have noticed that the C
    > drive is still identified as Generic IDE disk type 47 while the original
    > disk, now D, is identified as Generic IDE disk type 80 rather than the
    > 47 it used to be.
    >
    > Can anyone tell me what it means? Google has revealed nothing to me.
    > Should I somehow be trying to get my C drive redesignated as a type 80
    > and my old D drive as an 47? If so, how? Or should I not worry?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    >
    > Nick.

    If you're running Win2K/XP then you have created a configuration problem by
    imaging the C drive to D, swapping them, and running windows with BOTH
    installed because Windows2K/XP serializes hard drives which means that,
    once 'installed' and assigned a drive letter, physically 'moving' a drive
    does not alter the letter it's assigned. I.E. Windows2K/XP does not
    dynamically assign drive letters on every boot like Win9X does. It assigns
    the letter when first discovered, serializes them, and then knows which is
    which regardless of where they're physically located.

    The result is that while you 'think' the new drive is now drive C it isn't
    and, as far as windows is concerned, the old one is still C just as it
    always has been, which is why it is correctly identified as type 47, and
    the 'new' one is still drive D just as it was when it first identified it.

    The bigger problem is that you now have a mixed boot environment because
    the new drive, by virtue of you having placed it on the primary IDE channel
    as master, is the boot drive but as soon as windows comes alive it knows
    the other drive is C. So the 'new' drive boots, and is used by windows
    during the 'dumb' part of the boot phase, but then the old drive is 'C'
    when windows is operational.

    To illustrate the problem, if you remove what you *think* is the 'D' drive,
    I.E. the 'old' drive on the secondary controller, your system will have all
    kinds of 'missing file' errors, if it even boots, because there will be
    no 'C' drive.


    What you need to do is put the old drive back on the primary channel as
    master and leave out the new drive. Then boot up windows and verify that it
    still operates as before (it should). Then add the new drive back in, which
    will be 'D', as it was before. Then uninstall 'D'. Shutdown and physically
    remove the D drive. Reboot and verify that the 'D' drive identity has been
    removed from the registry and, if not, manually edit it out. I.E. look in

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE

    (and the other controlsets)

    for your drives and remove entries for the 'new' D (type 80).

    Here is an example entry from mine.

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE\DiskMaxtor_88400D8__________________________NAVX171F\384c333057384154202020202020202020202020

    To be thorough, pretend to 'rename' the identifier (e.g.
    384c333057384154202020202020202020202020) and copy it (without making any
    change). Then, starting from the top of the registry, do a search for that
    value and delete it's class entry. Then delete the entire disk entry in
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE

    Just the hard drive entry, NOT the 'IDE' key (you're not removing the IDE
    channel, just the one drive).

    Now we should be back to how Windows was before the new drive appeared to
    it so the remaining is how you should do this when adding a new drive you
    want to make the C drive.

    Make a new image (if you made the old one before installing the new drive
    you could use it but I'll bet you installed the new drive first) and image
    to the new drive WITHOUT installing the drive in Windows. You do NOT want
    Windows to know the drive exists yet. That's best done with a floppy boot
    disk of ghost, or whatever you're using, so that windows need not be run
    and so windows doesn't know about the D drive yet.

    After imaging the new drive REMOVE the old one and make the new one primary
    IDE master. Do NOT put the old drive on a secondary channel, or any place
    else, or else windows will see it on the first boot of the new drive and
    say "ah HAH, there is my old known C drive."

    Boot the new drive BY ITSELF. Windows will be confronted with the dilemma
    that its known 'C' is gone, but there's a new drive; and it's the boot
    drive... install it... hmm... must be C since there is no C unless I assign
    the new one there.

    Now, at this stage, I'd go in and remove the registry entry for the old
    drive just as we did earlier for the 'new' drive (that shouldn't have been
    installed before the image). That way, when you add it back in Windows will
    reindentify it (gee, got no entry for that one) and call it D.

    Its been my experience windows will do that anyway, whether the entry is
    removed first or not, because it will now have an affinity for the existing
    C drive, but it's not a bad idea to play it safe and remove it beforehand.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    David Maynard wrote:
    > Nick H wrote:
    >
    >> My PC had a single disk identified in Device Manager as a Generic IDE
    >> disk type 47, which was my C drive. I added a new disk on the
    >> secondary controller which became my D drive. I then copied an image
    >> across and switched the IDE cables over so my new disk was on the
    >> primary channel and became my C drive and the old disk then went on
    >> the secondary channel and became my D drive.
    >>
    >> I have just looked in device manager again and I have noticed that the
    >> C drive is still identified as Generic IDE disk type 47 while the
    >> original disk, now D, is identified as Generic IDE disk type 80 rather
    >> than the 47 it used to be.
    >>
    >> Can anyone tell me what it means? Google has revealed nothing to me.
    >> Should I somehow be trying to get my C drive redesignated as a type 80
    >> and my old D drive as an 47? If so, how? Or should I not worry?
    >>
    >> Many thanks,
    >>
    >> Nick.
    >
    >
    > If you're running Win2K/XP then you have created a configuration problem
    > by imaging the C drive to D, swapping them, and running windows with
    > BOTH installed because Windows2K/XP serializes hard drives which means
    > that, once 'installed' and assigned a drive letter, physically 'moving'
    > a drive does not alter the letter it's assigned. I.E. Windows2K/XP does
    > not dynamically assign drive letters on every boot like Win9X does. It
    > assigns the letter when first discovered, serializes them, and then
    > knows which is which regardless of where they're physically located.
    >
    > The result is that while you 'think' the new drive is now drive C it
    > isn't and, as far as windows is concerned, the old one is still C just
    > as it always has been, which is why it is correctly identified as type
    > 47, and the 'new' one is still drive D just as it was when it first
    > identified it.
    >
    > The bigger problem is that you now have a mixed boot environment because
    > the new drive, by virtue of you having placed it on the primary IDE
    > channel as master, is the boot drive but as soon as windows comes alive
    > it knows the other drive is C. So the 'new' drive boots, and is used by
    > windows during the 'dumb' part of the boot phase, but then the old drive
    > is 'C' when windows is operational.
    >
    > To illustrate the problem, if you remove what you *think* is the 'D'
    > drive, I.E. the 'old' drive on the secondary controller, your system
    > will have all kinds of 'missing file' errors, if it even boots, because
    > there will be no 'C' drive.
    >
    >
    > What you need to do is put the old drive back on the primary channel as
    > master and leave out the new drive. Then boot up windows and verify that
    > it still operates as before (it should). Then add the new drive back in,
    > which will be 'D', as it was before. Then uninstall 'D'. Shutdown and
    > physically remove the D drive. Reboot and verify that the 'D' drive
    > identity has been removed from the registry and, if not, manually edit
    > it out. I.E. look in
    >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE
    >
    > (and the other controlsets)
    >
    > for your drives and remove entries for the 'new' D (type 80).
    >
    > Here is an example entry from mine.
    >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE\DiskMaxtor_88400D8__________________________NAVX171F\384c333057384154202020202020202020202020
    >
    >
    > To be thorough, pretend to 'rename' the identifier (e.g.
    > 384c333057384154202020202020202020202020) and copy it (without making
    > any change). Then, starting from the top of the registry, do a search
    > for that value and delete it's class entry. Then delete the entire disk
    > entry in
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Enum\IDE
    >
    > Just the hard drive entry, NOT the 'IDE' key (you're not removing the
    > IDE channel, just the one drive).
    >
    > Now we should be back to how Windows was before the new drive appeared
    > to it so the remaining is how you should do this when adding a new drive
    > you want to make the C drive.
    >
    > Make a new image (if you made the old one before installing the new
    > drive you could use it but I'll bet you installed the new drive first)
    > and image to the new drive WITHOUT installing the drive in Windows. You
    > do NOT want Windows to know the drive exists yet. That's best done with
    > a floppy boot disk of ghost, or whatever you're using, so that windows
    > need not be run and so windows doesn't know about the D drive yet.
    >
    > After imaging the new drive REMOVE the old one and make the new one
    > primary IDE master. Do NOT put the old drive on a secondary channel, or
    > any place else, or else windows will see it on the first boot of the new
    > drive and say "ah HAH, there is my old known C drive."
    >
    > Boot the new drive BY ITSELF. Windows will be confronted with the
    > dilemma that its known 'C' is gone, but there's a new drive; and it's
    > the boot drive... install it... hmm... must be C since there is no C
    > unless I assign the new one there.
    >
    > Now, at this stage, I'd go in and remove the registry entry for the old
    > drive just as we did earlier for the 'new' drive (that shouldn't have
    > been installed before the image). That way, when you add it back in
    > Windows will reindentify it (gee, got no entry for that one) and call it D.
    >
    > Its been my experience windows will do that anyway, whether the entry is
    > removed first or not, because it will now have an affinity for the
    > existing C drive, but it's not a bad idea to play it safe and remove it
    > beforehand.
    >

    Thanks for the excellent reply, but please do not kill me yet. I forgot
    to mention in this post that I am running WinME!

    Since I have a very recent image, I deleted from device manager the Type
    80 entry and re-booted. It set up the entry again as type 80. I then did
    the same for the Type 47 device and re-booted. It also came back as Type
    47! As you suggest, I will try unplugging the old, secondary drive and
    re-boot the PC to check that the change has gone OK. If everything still
    works, I'll leave it well alone.

    Nick
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 17:42:06 GMT, Nick H <me@privacy.net>
    wrote:

    <snip>

    >Should I somehow be trying to get my C drive redesignated as a type 80
    >and my old D drive as an 47?

    No, that's fine.

    If so, how? Or should I not worry?

    Yes, not worry.
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