Help: Mobo Advice for 1Ghz CPU

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I need to build a system that can handle a lot of ram.

I have a socket 370 motherboard with a 1Ghz CPU attached, but since
the motherboard only supports up to 512mb of ram, can I get
recommendations for another motherboard to get?(I'll be working a lot
with a ram-disk).

I'll just use the 1Ghz processor and toss the present
board(http://www.bcmcom.com/tech/IN810EP/IN810ep.htm).

Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten ISland, New York.
15 answers Last reply
More about help mobo advice 1ghz
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Darren Harris wrote:

    > I need to build a system that can handle a lot of ram.
    >
    > I have a socket 370 motherboard with a 1Ghz CPU attached, but since
    > the motherboard only supports up to 512mb of ram, can I get
    > recommendations for another motherboard to get?(I'll be working a lot
    > with a ram-disk).
    >
    > I'll just use the 1Ghz processor and toss the present
    > board(http://www.bcmcom.com/tech/IN810EP/IN810ep.htm).
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten ISland, New York.

    How much is a lot?
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    If you're looking to do it a fairly cheap way, I'd go for a board with a VIA
    Apollo Pro 133A chipset. It supports the 133Mhz bus which your 1Ghz
    processor probably uses (assuming its not a celeron, which runs at 100Mhz).
    The only Intel-made chipsets for socket 370 systems that supports a 133Mhz
    bus and over 512MB of RAM uses RDRAM, which is a bit too pricey to think
    about for a large amount of RAM. If it is in fact a celeron, you may be able
    to get by with an Intel BX-based board (with either native FC-PGA support or
    with an small adapter). The BX chipset can accept more than 512MB of RAM,
    but it will only take the lower density chips so putting in 512MB modules
    becomes very pricey.

    The Apollo Pro 133a boards can take the 64x64 high-density PC133 modules
    that are much cheaper per MB than the normal lower-density ones. You can get
    512MB modules like this for around $30 each if you search pricewatch. You
    should be able to put 1GB easily in, maybe more. To get much more than that
    you'd probably need to step up to a more server-class board with a
    server-level chipset that takes registered RAM.

    Hope this helps,
    -Eric Gross

    "Darren Harris" <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message
    news:9437a27c.0409151438.65605c31@posting.google.com...
    > I need to build a system that can handle a lot of ram.
    >
    > I have a socket 370 motherboard with a 1Ghz CPU attached, but since
    > the motherboard only supports up to 512mb of ram, can I get
    > recommendations for another motherboard to get?(I'll be working a lot
    > with a ram-disk).
    >
    > I'll just use the 1Ghz processor and toss the present
    > board(http://www.bcmcom.com/tech/IN810EP/IN810ep.htm).
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten ISland, New York.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 22:20:15 -0400, "Eric Gross"
    <ecg5@po.cwru.edu> wrote:

    >If you're looking to do it a fairly cheap way, I'd go for a board with a VIA
    >Apollo Pro 133A chipset. It supports the 133Mhz bus which your 1Ghz
    >processor probably uses (assuming its not a celeron, which runs at 100Mhz).
    >The only Intel-made chipsets for socket 370 systems that supports a 133Mhz
    >bus and over 512MB of RAM uses RDRAM, which is a bit too pricey to think
    >about for a large amount of RAM. If it is in fact a celeron, you may be able
    >to get by with an Intel BX-based board (with either native FC-PGA support or
    >with an small adapter). The BX chipset can accept more than 512MB of RAM,
    >but it will only take the lower density chips so putting in 512MB modules
    >becomes very pricey.

    BX does not support 512MB modules, IIRC, 256MB per.


    >
    >The Apollo Pro 133a boards can take the 64x64 high-density PC133 modules
    >that are much cheaper per MB than the normal lower-density ones. You can get
    >512MB modules like this for around $30 each if you search pricewatch. You
    >should be able to put 1GB easily in, maybe more. To get much more than that
    >you'd probably need to step up to a more server-class board with a
    >server-level chipset that takes registered RAM.

    Apollo Pro 133A or 133T are good choices, the 133T if only
    because it's the newer generation, best odds of most
    refined/mature board and of supporting 48bit LBA. $30
    pricewatch modules might be a problem though if trying to
    max out the board, often when using more than 2 of the cheap
    512MB modules I found that era of board to be instable,
    unless higher-grade memory was used instead. That's not to
    say that can't work, but if modules are bought from somplace
    with poor return policy as often found on pricewatch, it
    could be a real PITA to get modules that work OK alone,
    replaced because they won't work with 2 or more identical
    modules used. LOL, some of the companies on pricewatch
    might send a 64MB dimm and still it's a PITA to get them to
    just replace and send what was ordered or get a refund.

    Another potential issue is that a few of the boards from
    that era (actually more than just a few, many of them) had
    the "potentially" defective capacitors in 'em, labeled as
    Lelon, Luxon, Tayeh, Jackcon, I.Q, JPCON, Chhsi, et al.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:emmik091p7ajd17u327mmf96h6tbl32b7o@4ax.com...
    > BX does not support 512MB modules, IIRC, 256MB per.

    I don't think that's true. As long as you get modules made with the lower
    density chips (I believe you'd need a 512MB module with 16 chips per side;
    so a double-row module), it should work correctly.

    -Eric Gross
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Darren,

    I have an FIC FR33 mainboard with 2x512 Crucial sticks, which is the max for
    the board, and a Celeron 1000. This has been working flawlessly for about 3
    years. I'm in the process of assembling components for a new P4 build.

    If you're interested, maybe we can work something out.

    Wayne1935@hotmail.com

    "Darren Harris" <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message
    news:9437a27c.0409151438.65605c31@posting.google.com...
    >I need to build a system that can handle a lot of ram.
    >
    > I have a socket 370 motherboard with a 1Ghz CPU attached, but since
    > the motherboard only supports up to 512mb of ram, can I get
    > recommendations for another motherboard to get?(I'll be working a lot
    > with a ram-disk).
    >
    > I'll just use the 1Ghz processor and toss the present
    > board(http://www.bcmcom.com/tech/IN810EP/IN810ep.htm).
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten ISland, New York.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Eric Gross wrote:

    > "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    > news:emmik091p7ajd17u327mmf96h6tbl32b7o@4ax.com...
    >
    >>BX does not support 512MB modules, IIRC, 256MB per.
    >
    >
    > I don't think that's true. As long as you get modules made with the lower
    > density chips (I believe you'd need a 512MB module with 16 chips per side;
    > so a double-row module), it should work correctly.
    >
    > -Eric Gross
    >
    >

    From the data sheet

    • DRAM type: Extended Data Out (EDO) (mobile only) or Synchronous (SDRAM)
    DRAM controller optimized for dual/quad-bank SDRAM organization on a row by
    row basis
    • Memory Size: 8 MB to 512 MB (1GB with Registered DIMMs) with eight memory
    rows
    • Addressing Type: Symmetrical and Asymmetrical addressing
    • Memory Modules supported: Single and double density 3.3V DIMMs
    • DRAM device technology: 16 Mbit and 64 Mbit

    It's more complicated than the 'simple' specs though. You have to turn to
    the design guides.

    "The 82443BX when configured with 3 double-sided DIMMs using 64Mbit
    technology (using x8 devices) may have a total memory size of 384MB. In
    order to achieve 512MB while using the same type of devices, a fourth DIMM
    socket must be added which adds extra DQ loading. In order to offset the
    heavy loading on the DQ lines, a FET switch mux is recommended to reduce
    the loading for memory driving the 82443BX, and vice versa."

    Most SOHO main boards, at least originally, implemented the 3 DIMM, 384
    Meg, design.

    "Workstation and server designs face yet another problem in that 1Gbyte
    memory configurations are a mandatory requirement for their customers. In
    order to build 256Mbyte DIMMs using present day technology, x4 SDRAM
    devices must be used. The loading on the control lines (MA/Bxx, CS#, DQM,
    CK, etc.) are now twice the loading of a x8 device. A DIMM which
    registers” these control lines must be produced in order to meet 100 MHz
    timings (note that a PLL must be added to the registered DIMM and the
    additional PLL jitter must be factored into the overall timing analysis)."

    'Present day' is 1998, in that context. To which an interesting note:

    "Intel is also working with DRAM industry leaders to pull in their
    schedules of 128Mbit technology in order to achieve a 256MB DIMM solution.
    In addition to this, improvements and standardization of DIMM topologies
    are in progress in order to add back margin to the overall timing budget."

    The upshot is, BX was not designed with 512MB memory modules in mind and,
    indeed, even 256meg modules weren't available. The signal lines just aren't
    there to plug 512MB modules into the DIMM slots.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > How much is a lot?

    As much as possible.

    I just need some mobo recommendations.(Perhaps I can pick up one from Ebay).

    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 17 Sep 2004 05:54:35 -0700, Searcher7@mail.con2.com
    (Darren Harris) wrote:

    >> How much is a lot?
    >
    >As much as possible.
    >
    >I just need some mobo recommendations.(Perhaps I can pick up one from Ebay).

    Beware of "as is" hardware on ebay.

    You might have best results with Abit, Asus, or MSI, maybe
    Tyan but theirs had fewer user-configurable options, IIRC.
    Via 694X or 694T chipset. Don't remember the model numbers,
    but visiting the forementioned manufacturer's websites
    should turn up that info.

    http://www.abit.com.tw
    http://www.asus.com
    http://www.msi.com.tw
    http://www.tyan.com

    You might find a deal on one at a local mom-n-pop computer
    shop.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Thanks a lot.

    I checked Asus, and the info on their motherboards with Via 694X or
    694T chipsets is difficult to find. Obviously they are more concerned
    with their more recent mobos.

    I just won an ASUS CUV4X R1.03
    Motherboard(http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6708521661).
    It seems to have integrated audio, and I guess I can use my old video
    card.

    I can only assume that 1.5Gb is the maximum capacity for memory that
    I'll find for one of these Pentium 3(socket 370) motherboards.

    Anyway, I guess that the trick now is getting three 512mb modules that
    will actually work with it.

    Thanks again.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 19 Sep 2004 15:10:55 -0700, Searcher7@mail.con2.com (Darren Harris)
    wrote:

    >Thanks a lot.
    >
    >I checked Asus, and the info on their motherboards with Via 694X or
    >694T chipsets is difficult to find. Obviously they are more concerned
    >with their more recent mobos.

    Tell me about it...
    >
    >I just won an ASUS CUV4X R1.03
    >Motherboard(http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6708521661).
    >It seems to have integrated audio, and I guess I can use my old video
    >card.
    >
    >I can only assume that 1.5Gb is the maximum capacity for memory that
    >I'll find for one of these Pentium 3(socket 370) motherboards.
    >
    >Anyway, I guess that the trick now is getting three 512mb modules that
    >will actually work with it.

    Yep. I have a CUV4X-D (dual processor version of your board, which is
    an early-2001 design). I use three 512 MB sticks of 133 Mhz SDRAM. I
    have four slots, but if you fill 'em all, the system's unstable. Go
    figure.

    On the upside, I like and have bought a few ASUS boards and they are
    (for me, at least) quite dependable. You have a new machine with
    three-year-old specs, but that doesn't mean it can't be ENTIRELY
    sufficient for your needs. Mine is still used daily for
    graphics-intensive work, and only in the last six months have I been
    conscious that it's getting a little past due for replacement.

    Also, it's too damn noisy, and my next Monster Rig will cost whatever
    it takes to get it quiet...<G>

    R.
    >
    >Thanks again.
    >
    >Darren Harris
    >Staten Island, New York.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 19 Sep 2004 15:10:55 -0700, Searcher7@mail.con2.com
    (Darren Harris) wrote:

    >Thanks a lot.
    >
    >I checked Asus, and the info on their motherboards with Via 694X or
    >694T chipsets is difficult to find. Obviously they are more concerned
    >with their more recent mobos.
    >
    >I just won an ASUS CUV4X R1.03
    >Motherboard(http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6708521661).
    >It seems to have integrated audio, and I guess I can use my old video
    >card.
    >
    >I can only assume that 1.5Gb is the maximum capacity for memory that
    >I'll find for one of these Pentium 3(socket 370) motherboards.
    >
    >Anyway, I guess that the trick now is getting three 512mb modules that
    >will actually work with it.
    >
    >Thanks again.

    Yes, support 512MB per slot, with most boards having only 3
    slots... otherwise 2GB (or more??).

    I've had a couple with (nothing special, typicial
    budget-grade memory that was almost FAR at the time) as 2 x
    512MB, in general they didn't seem very picky about memory
    to me though no experience with that specific board nor 3
    double-sided modules in it.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I'm just apprehensive about what memory I need to get because my last
    motherboard which was supposed to support 768mb of ram only saw 512mb.

    Nevertheless, it seems I can get sticks for about $30-$40 on Ebay.

    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 22 Sep 2004 17:18:07 -0700, Searcher7@mail.con2.com
    (Darren Harris) wrote:

    >I'm just apprehensive about what memory I need to get because my last
    >motherboard which was supposed to support 768mb of ram only saw 512mb.
    >
    >Nevertheless, it seems I can get sticks for about $30-$40 on Ebay.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >Darren Harris
    >Staten Island, New York.


    The board's 694X chipset allows use of the most common,
    PC133 memory available just about anywhere, though as always
    a name-brand is a better bet than unknown generics. The
    best deal might be found after rebate in your local weekend
    papers, or for guaranteed compatibility go somewhere like
    http://www.crucial.com
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Thanks for all of the advice.

    I picked up an ASUS CUV4X motherboard which will supports three 512mb
    modules. So it's a matter of finding the correct ram. Someone in my
    area wants to sell me some used ram, but he won't give me a price. I
    get the "How much do you want to spend", line. :-)

    I was going to try to trade some SCSI hardware I have to someone via
    Craigslist, but if I can get the ram cheap, and my system doesn't
    "see" all three sticks, it wouldn't be a big loss.

    Thanks again.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > The board's 694X chipset allows use of the most common,
    > PC133 memory available just about anywhere, though as always
    > a name-brand is a better bet than unknown generics. The
    > best deal might be found after rebate in your local weekend
    > papers, or for guaranteed compatibility go somewhere like
    > http://www.crucial.com

    Thanks a lot.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
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