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Power Supply Questions

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October 7, 2004 5:32:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Hello:

The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?

Thanks in advance for your help!

More about : power supply questions

October 7, 2004 2:06:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

it depends on what you do with you computer.
a standard computer doesn't need 500 watt...350 is enough for it.
but if you like casemodding you better get a 400 or 500 watts.


"LuckyDog" <luckydog@spamless.com> schreef in bericht
news:civ9m05gdtv4t2gq2ai3nv9c92g173le8m@4ax.com...
> Hello:
>
> The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
> whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
> going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
> higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>
> Thanks in advance for your help!
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 7, 2004 4:01:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 01:32:39 -0700, LuckyDog
<luckydog@spamless.com> wrote:

>Hello:
>
>The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
>whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
>going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
>higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>
>Thanks in advance for your help!


Do you plan on needing support for significant upgrades, and
if so, will you need a 2nd power supply and if so, one
larger or same size for similar 2nd system?

A moment to plan your PC's future will help determine the
best long-term strategy for replacement. Since it runs OK
from 350W, you could just get another 350W. If you're not a
hardcore gamer, don't run a half-dozen hard drives or SMP
system, 350W should be plenty for a next-generation rebuilt.

Typically a barebones generic system has a relatively poor
quality generic power supply in it. That means it's likely
not even worth 300W, let alone 350W. It also usually means
a low-quality fan, probably why yours is now noisey? You
might find that lubing the fan is all that's needed. If you
want to replace it anyway, something like a 350W Sparkle
should do fine and is a good value, or closer to 420-250W if
any of the former demanding scenarios apply.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 7, 2004 7:36:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Changing the fan is no big deal. If you are lucky then the fan power lead is
socketed not soldered and you can simple replace it with a 80x80x25mm system
fan, plugging the red and black lead only in. If it's soldered then you can
use crimp splices or a small electrical junction strip. Make sure that you
leave the PSU unplugged for 30 mins to make sure it's fully discharged. The
whole process is described here:
http://www.bleedinedge.com/guides/psu_fan_r2/psu_fan_r2...
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 7, 2004 10:54:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 01:32:39 -0700, LuckyDog <luckydog@spamless.com> wrote:

>The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
>whirling sounds.

Have you tried cleaning the fan? Might be some dirt throwing it off balance.
--
Chris Pollard


CG Internet café, Tagum City, Philippines
http://www.cginternet.net
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 2:32:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

> The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
> whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
> going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
> higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?

Get a 300 W. It will run cooler, quieter, and has more power than
you are ever likely to need.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 2:32:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"Al Smith" <invalid@address.com> wrote in message
news:o uj9d.144895$Np3.6165787@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>> The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
>> whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
>> going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
>> higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>
> Get a 300 W. It will run cooler, quieter, and has more power than you are
> ever likely to need.

A decent video card today requires a 300W power supply as a MINIMUM. If you
want the supply to survive even a minor upgrade, your power supply had
better be more than 300W. -Dave
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 9:59:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

>>>The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
>>>>> whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
>>>>> going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
>>>>> higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>>
>>>
>>> Get a 300 W. It will run cooler, quieter, and has more power than you are
>>> ever likely to need.
>
>
> A decent video card today requires a 300W power supply as a MINIMUM. If you
> want the supply to survive even a minor upgrade, your power supply had
> better be more than 300W. -Dave
>
>
Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.
October 8, 2004 9:59:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Thanks very much for your help everyone. I will try to clean the fan
first. If that doesn't work then I'll probably replace it with the
same 350W. I don't run games or do complicated graphics on my machine.
:-)


On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 05:59:45 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com>
wrote:

>>>>The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
>>>>>> whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
>>>>>> going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
>>>>>> higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>>>
>>>>
>>>> Get a 300 W. It will run cooler, quieter, and has more power than you are
>>>> ever likely to need.
>>
>>
>> A decent video card today requires a 300W power supply as a MINIMUM. If you
>> want the supply to survive even a minor upgrade, your power supply had
>> better be more than 300W. -Dave
>>
>>
>Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
>supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
>just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 12:41:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 05:59:45 GMT, Al Smith
<invalid@address.com> wrote:

>Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
>supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
>just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.

Huh?

Typically a decent higher wattage PSU has larger heatsinks
and better fan control, it will be cooler and quieter unless
ill-designed (on average it would be at least cooler or
quieter if not both).

One of the main issues with power supply large enough to
work, but not with much margin, is the output filter caps
are stessed, fail sooner. Main issue is then if it provides
acceptible service life and what happens (if) it fails.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 7:47:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

>>Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
>>>supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
>>>just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.
>
>
> Huh?
>
> Typically a decent higher wattage PSU has larger heatsinks
> and better fan control, it will be cooler and quieter unless
> ill-designed (on average it would be at least cooler or
> quieter if not both).

I grant you this might be the case -- but only because you won't
find a really shoddy 500 W power supply that easily. People who
buy 500 W power supplies want quality. However, it stands to
reason that a 500 W power supply of the same quality as a 300 W
power supply is going to generate more heat. As for noise, that
depends on the quality of the fan, and on its diameter.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 7:47:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:

> > Huh?
> >
> > Typically a decent higher wattage PSU has larger heatsinks
> > and better fan control, it will be cooler and quieter unless
> > ill-designed (on average it would be at least cooler or
> > quieter if not both).
>
> I grant you this might be the case -- but only because you won't
> find a really shoddy 500 W power supply that easily. People who
> buy 500 W power supplies want quality. However, it stands to
> reason that a 500 W power supply of the same quality as a 300 W
> power supply is going to generate more heat.

Huh? Why?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 8:51:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 15:47:35 GMT, Al Smith
<invalid@address.com> wrote:

>>>Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
>>>>supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
>>>>just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.
>>
>>
>> Huh?
>>
>> Typically a decent higher wattage PSU has larger heatsinks
>> and better fan control, it will be cooler and quieter unless
>> ill-designed (on average it would be at least cooler or
>> quieter if not both).
>
>I grant you this might be the case -- but only because you won't
>find a really shoddy 500 W power supply that easily. People who
>buy 500 W power supplies want quality. However, it stands to
>reason that a 500 W power supply of the same quality as a 300 W
>power supply is going to generate more heat. As for noise, that
>depends on the quality of the fan, and on its diameter.

Unfortunately there are a lot of poor 500W, for example
http://www.google.com/froogle?q=500W+ATX&btnG=Search+Fr...

It does not stand to reason that a 500W will generate much
more heat, perhaps it's a couple percent less efficient, but
that's hardly significant if the system would've ran from
300W anyway, lower system power usage makes percentage
difference even less meaningful.

Noise may depend on quality of fan after it's worn out, but
initally it can depend more on how much time and thought was
put into engineering the fan control circuit. Take a PSU
with relatively quiet fan, typical single 80x25mm size, and
swap in a cheap junk fan of similar amperage rating, and
it'll still be quiet due to the integral fan speed
controller.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 8, 2004 11:06:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Dissemble & then remove the sticker in the centre of the fan. On most you
then remove the little rubber plug in the centre & then put one drop of thin
machine (sewing?) oil in the hole but to one side of it while spinning the
blade. Pop the rubber back in to keep dust out. Forget the sticker as it's
usually hidden. That should get you another 3 years or till you sell the
machine.
BruceM


"kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
news:1hkcm0dfs6bk36j7k2ulmgs76u446mb9je@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 05:59:45 GMT, Al Smith
> <invalid@address.com> wrote:
>
> >Home builders almost always overstate the need for a large power
> >supply. If it works, it is big enough. If it works, it will work
> >just as well as a 500 W power supply, but with less heat and noise.
>
> Huh?
>
> Typically a decent higher wattage PSU has larger heatsinks
> and better fan control, it will be cooler and quieter unless
> ill-designed (on average it would be at least cooler or
> quieter if not both).
>
> One of the main issues with power supply large enough to
> work, but not with much margin, is the output filter caps
> are stessed, fail sooner. Main issue is then if it provides
> acceptible service life and what happens (if) it fails.
October 9, 2004 2:13:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 22:32:52 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:

> > The original power supply that came with my barebone system is making
> > whirling sounds. I think it's going to die soon. It's a 350W. I am
> > going to buy a new one before this one give out. Should I go with a
> > higher wattage one - say 500W, or should I get another 350W one?
>
> Get a 300 W. It will run cooler, quieter, and has more power than
> you are ever likely to need.

A bigger PSU runs cooler and quieter than a small PSU.
!