Best CPU choice to avoid overheating in a small case.

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo, one
floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
60mm fans, one front and one rear.
PSU is rated at 200w.
I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was wondering
which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
different location., so nothing will go to waste.
TIA,
Kevin.
P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
ask. ;-)
25 answers Last reply
More about best choice avoid overheating small case
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    your choice should be in cpu coolers not cpus themselves. Btw the major case
    heater is your harddrives and psu rather than your cpu

    "Kevin Lawton" <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:clr7pt$mng$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    > word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
    > case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo,
    > one
    > floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
    > 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    > PSU is rated at 200w.
    > I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
    > and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    > wondering
    > which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
    > case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
    > different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    > TIA,
    > Kevin.
    > P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
    > ask. ;-)
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Kevin Lawton" <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:clr7pt$mng$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    > word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
    > case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo,
    > one
    > floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
    > 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    > PSU is rated at 200w.
    > I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
    > and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    > wondering
    > which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
    > case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
    > different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    > TIA,
    > Kevin.
    > P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
    > ask. ;-)

    Any heat problems will be down to what cooler you use, not which processor!
    I have an older Shuttle case in my living room with an Althon XP 1800+, but
    i have it turned down from its default 1533MHz to around 1250MHz. I also
    intend to lower the voltage on the chip slightly - this means much less
    heat. So you could consider the same move?? The shuttle case came with a
    heatpipe and radiator at the rear with the exhaust fan blowing right through
    it and out the back of the case, perhaps you could investigate something
    along these lines.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 16:46:53 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote:

    >Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    >I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    >word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
    >case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo, one
    >floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
    >60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    >PSU is rated at 200w.
    >I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
    >and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    >I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was wondering
    >which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
    >case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
    >different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    >TIA,
    >Kevin.
    >P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
    >ask. ;-)
    >
    >

    The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.

    Reliability isn't necessarily tied to heat though, driver or
    OS bugs, or particular motherboard makes/models can also
    play a large role in that. We can however only judge by the
    info provided.

    A pair of 60mm fans should suffice, particularly if you
    aren't using a high-performance (gaming) video card, but if
    you can mod the case to accept an 80x25mm fan you may be
    able to achieve greater efficiency, same flow at lower noise
    or higher flow at same noise, providing you choose
    appropriate fan. A single 80x25mm fan may even allow
    removing the "other" 60mm fan if the chassis airflow path(s)
    is fair to good.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 13:42:04 -0400, "Monster"
    <do.not.email@yo.mamas.hairy.ass.com> wrote:

    >your choice should be in cpu coolers not cpus themselves. Btw the major case
    >heater is your harddrives and psu rather than your cpu
    >

    No, no, and no.

    In a small case the heatsink size may be limited by
    available space. Even so the same heatsink could be used on
    either CPU, perhaps modding the Athlon 'sink if it exceeds
    the socket 370 keep out zone.

    It is untrue that harddrives and PSU are the major case
    heaters. PSU EXHAUSTS, drawing out case air with it. Any
    system set up this way will be COOLER as a result of having
    the PSU in it, not hotter.

    A single hard drive (OP is not setting up a multidrive
    fileserver) should consume roughly 10W, which is less than
    CPU, many video cards, or the motherboard itself.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:
    | On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 16:46:53 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    | <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote:
    |
    || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    || micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted
    || on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    || PSU is rated at 200w.
    || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    || wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    || problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be
    || used in a bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go
    || to waste.
    || TIA,
    || Kevin.
    || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    || best to ask. ;-)
    ||
    ||
    |
    | The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    | less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    | sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    | idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    | boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    | HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.
    |
    | Reliability isn't necessarily tied to heat though, driver or
    | OS bugs, or particular motherboard makes/models can also
    | play a large role in that. We can however only judge by the
    | info provided.
    |
    | A pair of 60mm fans should suffice, particularly if you
    | aren't using a high-performance (gaming) video card, but if
    | you can mod the case to accept an 80x25mm fan you may be
    | able to achieve greater efficiency, same flow at lower noise
    | or higher flow at same noise, providing you choose
    | appropriate fan. A single 80x25mm fan may even allow
    | removing the "other" 60mm fan if the chassis airflow path(s)
    | is fair to good.

    That's what I thought might be the case - that the P-III would dissipate
    less heat than the Duron (thunderbird, I think). Whichever I use, the HSF
    will be a Coolermaster Aero. The mobos are both VIA chipset jobs with
    integrated S3 Savage 4 graphics, Creative sound and Realtek network.
    I certainly won't be able to fit an 80mm fan at the back, but could possibly
    drill extra holes to allow two 60mm fans side-by-side. At the front, I might
    be able to re-drill and fit an 80mm fan.
    So thanks, I'll put the P-III in the very small case with the 60mm fans and
    the Duron in the larger case which will take 80mm fans.
    Cheers,
    Kevin.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Gareth Tuckwell <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote:
    | "Kevin Lawton" <socks.kepla.shoes@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    | news:clr7pt$mng$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    || micro-ATX mobo, one
    || floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow
    || is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    || PSU is rated at 200w.
    || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    || wondering
    || which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the
    || small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a
    || bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    || TIA,
    || Kevin.
    || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    || best to ask. ;-)
    |
    | Any heat problems will be down to what cooler you use, not which
    | processor! I have an older Shuttle case in my living room with an
    | Althon XP 1800+, but i have it turned down from its default 1533MHz
    | to around 1250MHz. I also intend to lower the voltage on the chip
    | slightly - this means much less heat. So you could consider the same
    | move?? The shuttle case came with a heatpipe and radiator at the rear
    | with the exhaust fan blowing right through it and out the back of the
    | case, perhaps you could investigate something along these lines.

    I will be using CoolerMaster Aero HSFs on both processors, but I would have
    thought that heat dissipation was down to how much heat the processor
    produces ? I believe that the P-III will produce less heat than the Duron
    but I'm not absolutely certain.
    I'm not too sure about reducing the voltage and clock rate. I don't need
    terrific performance, but a 733 MHz P-III or a 1 GHz Duron aren't exactly
    'cutting edge' anyway. I'll be installing Motherboard Monitor (MBM-5) to
    keep an eye on the temps - just wanted to get the build as good as possible
    first.
    Not too sure I really fancy having to go to the complexity and expense of a
    heatpipe and stuff - though it does sound like a good idea for high
    performance systems.
    Thanks,
    Kevin.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 18:25:35 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:


    >I will be using CoolerMaster Aero HSFs on both processors, but I would have
    >thought that heat dissipation was down to how much heat the processor
    >produces ? I believe that the P-III will produce less heat than the Duron
    >but I'm not absolutely certain.
    >I'm not too sure about reducing the voltage and clock rate. I don't need
    >terrific performance, but a 733 MHz P-III or a 1 GHz Duron aren't exactly
    >'cutting edge' anyway. I'll be installing Motherboard Monitor (MBM-5) to
    >keep an eye on the temps - just wanted to get the build as good as possible
    >first.
    >Not too sure I really fancy having to go to the complexity and expense of a
    >heatpipe and stuff - though it does sound like a good idea for high
    >performance systems.

    A coolermaster aero is more than sufficient for the P3.

    I have a miniATX box with less than (the average airflow for
    2 x 60mm fans), it has a Celeron 900 in it with a small
    'sink, 50 x 15 mm fan undervolted to 7V and still stays cool
    enough. With the Coolermaster Aero you can probably reduce
    it's fan voltage to the point where the fan is barely
    spinning (< 7V) and still have CPU stay cool enough
    providing it's base is smooth for best heat transfer.

    A P3-733 is very easy to keep cool, though if the
    motherboard allowed reducing voltage to around 1.55V, it
    might barely need a fan at all.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Matt <matt@themattfella.zzzz.com> wrote:
    | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    |
    || case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX
    || mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its
    || side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    || PSU is rated at 200w
    |
    | Take a look at the Antec Aria case (300W, no floppy, 3 HD, quiet):
    |
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=11-129-146&depa=1
    |
    http://www.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=2936216/search=antec
    %2520aria

    What's this - a PC case without a floppy ?
    It does seem to be a very pretty case, and if I was in the market for
    another case I might think about it.
    As it happens, I already have the case and was concerned about whether it
    would be able to cope with the heat dissipation of an AMD CPU or if it would
    be better to use the Intel.
    And there's still the problem of where do you mount your floppy and zip
    drives in that Aria case.
    It looks like I'll be playing the safe bet and using the P-III,
    Kevin.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >What's this - a PC case without a floppy ?
    >It does seem to be a very pretty case, and if I was in the market for
    >another case I might think about it.
    >As it happens, I already have the case and was concerned about whether it
    >would be able to cope with the heat dissipation of an AMD CPU or if it would
    >be better to use the Intel.
    >And there's still the problem of where do you mount your floppy and zip
    >drives in that Aria case.
    >It looks like I'll be playing the safe bet and using the P-III,
    >Kevin.


    The 35 watt Mobile Barton is the best. I run over half a dozen in very
    small custom boxes. 2400+ is unlocked and does 3400+ right out of the
    box. $85 shipped:
    http://tinyurl.com/2ksr6

    Even though you have one already, this small case has a floppy bay,
    $71 shipped ( I got 3 ):
    http://tinyurl.com/2xrke
    Review:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/howto/20031209/case-09.html
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:
    | On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 18:25:35 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    | <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:
    |
    |
    || I will be using CoolerMaster Aero HSFs on both processors, but I
    || would have thought that heat dissipation was down to how much heat
    || the processor produces ? I believe that the P-III will produce less
    || heat than the Duron but I'm not absolutely certain.
    || I'm not too sure about reducing the voltage and clock rate. I don't
    || need terrific performance, but a 733 MHz P-III or a 1 GHz Duron
    || aren't exactly 'cutting edge' anyway. I'll be installing Motherboard
    || Monitor (MBM-5) to keep an eye on the temps - just wanted to get the
    || build as good as possible first.
    || Not too sure I really fancy having to go to the complexity and
    || expense of a heatpipe and stuff - though it does sound like a good
    || idea for high performance systems.
    |
    | A coolermaster aero is more than sufficient for the P3.
    |
    | I have a miniATX box with less than (the average airflow for
    | 2 x 60mm fans), it has a Celeron 900 in it with a small
    | 'sink, 50 x 15 mm fan undervolted to 7V and still stays cool
    | enough. With the Coolermaster Aero you can probably reduce
    | it's fan voltage to the point where the fan is barely
    | spinning (< 7V) and still have CPU stay cool enough
    | providing it's base is smooth for best heat transfer.
    |
    | A P3-733 is very easy to keep cool, though if the
    | motherboard allowed reducing voltage to around 1.55V, it
    | might barely need a fan at all.

    The Coolermaster Aero comes with a speed control so I can always try
    different speeds once the PC is built. I might also fit a switch to allow
    the case fans to be run at 9v instead of 12v (easy to do with a 9v regulator
    chip).
    Thanks for the help,
    Kevin.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    AndrewJ <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote:
    || What's this - a PC case without a floppy ?
    || It does seem to be a very pretty case, and if I was in the market for
    || another case I might think about it.
    || As it happens, I already have the case and was concerned about
    || whether it would be able to cope with the heat dissipation of an AMD
    || CPU or if it would be better to use the Intel.
    || And there's still the problem of where do you mount your floppy and
    || zip drives in that Aria case.
    || It looks like I'll be playing the safe bet and using the P-III,
    || Kevin.
    |
    |
    | The 35 watt Mobile Barton is the best. I run over half a dozen in very
    | small custom boxes. 2400+ is unlocked and does 3400+ right out of the
    | box. $85 shipped:
    | http://tinyurl.com/2ksr6
    |
    | Even though you have one already, this small case has a floppy bay,
    | $71 shipped ( I got 3 ):
    | http://tinyurl.com/2xrke
    | Review:
    | http://www.tomshardware.com/howto/20031209/case-09.html

    Thanks, but that would mean I have to go out and buy something instead of
    using the hardware I already have.
    The CPU and case you mention will be usefull for a future project, though,
    and I do hope they don't mind shipping to England at those prices ! :-)
    Kevin.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    > less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    > sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    > idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    > boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    > HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.

    You can get software that will continually tell the Athlon to go into the
    HLT state when your processor is not being used heavily. I use CPUIdle and
    it keeps my Athlon 2400+ down to about 33-35 degrees, when not loaded (31
    degrees right now). I am able to use a silent fan and large heatsink - the
    only think I can hear in the machine is the Hard Disk and that is a special
    quiet Samsung Spinpoint job!
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Gareth Tuckwell <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote:
    || The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    || less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    || sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    || idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    || boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    || HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.
    |
    | You can get software that will continually tell the Athlon to go into
    | the HLT state when your processor is not being used heavily. I use
    | CPUIdle and it keeps my Athlon 2400+ down to about 33-35 degrees,
    | when not loaded (31 degrees right now). I am able to use a silent fan
    | and large heatsink - the only think I can hear in the machine is the
    | Hard Disk and that is a special quiet Samsung Spinpoint job!

    That's an interesting idea, and one I hadn't thought of. Does 'CPUidle'
    affect the machine's performance any ?
    I have a 1.4 GHz Athlon Thunderbird machine which is a right bugger to keep
    cool, it spends its life running a database. If CPUidle will get it to run
    cooler without hitting the database performance then I'll give it a try.
    Thanks.
    Kevin.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 08:43:18 GMT, "Gareth Tuckwell"
    <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >> The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    >> less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    >> sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    >> idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    >> boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    >> HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.
    >
    >You can get software that will continually tell the Athlon to go into the
    >HLT state when your processor is not being used heavily. I use CPUIdle and
    >it keeps my Athlon 2400+ down to about 33-35 degrees, when not loaded (31
    >degrees right now). I am able to use a silent fan and large heatsink - the
    >only think I can hear in the machine is the Hard Disk and that is a special
    >quiet Samsung Spinpoint job!
    >

    It is true that an Athlon can be put into HLT state, but it
    still has the potential to run hotter when not in HLT state,
    including large current swings that may need more power
    supply than often found in SFF systems... depends a lot on
    what that SFF system was engineered to accomodate, including
    it's airflow. It can't be assumed that a CPU set up to run
    in HLT-idle mode will always do so either, Windows may crash
    in some way and/or something else puts CPU in a busy loop
    and ultimately the need was there to accomodate the CPU's
    potential non-idle (if not full load) power & heat.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 13:10:58 +0000 (UTC), "Kevin Lawton"
    <socks.kepla.shoes@btinternet.com> wrote:

    >Gareth Tuckwell <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >|| The P3 is better for that use, it will produce significantly
    >|| less heat. Google or visit manufacturer's websites for spec
    >|| sheets detailing heat, but additionally the P3 will be
    >|| idling most of the time in a HLT state while early Athlon
    >|| boards (and many later for that matter) did not enable the
    >|| HLT-idle feature. It will be a significant difference.
    >|
    >| You can get software that will continually tell the Athlon to go into
    >| the HLT state when your processor is not being used heavily. I use
    >| CPUIdle and it keeps my Athlon 2400+ down to about 33-35 degrees,
    >| when not loaded (31 degrees right now). I am able to use a silent fan
    >| and large heatsink - the only think I can hear in the machine is the
    >| Hard Disk and that is a special quiet Samsung Spinpoint job!
    >
    >That's an interesting idea, and one I hadn't thought of. Does 'CPUidle'
    >affect the machine's performance any ?
    >I have a 1.4 GHz Athlon Thunderbird machine which is a right bugger to keep
    >cool, it spends its life running a database. If CPUidle will get it to run
    >cooler without hitting the database performance then I'll give it a try.
    >Thanks.
    >Kevin.
    >

    It will effect performance but probably not a lot for your
    use. Coming out of idle state requires a few cycles which
    makes it a bad choice for some realtime activity like video
    capture. The other argument for disabling HLT was that the
    current swings from idle to load were high and it could
    cause instability, but this is something you'd have to check
    on the specific config you're running.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    > word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
    > case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo, one
    > floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
    > 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    > PSU is rated at 200w.
    > I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
    > and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was wondering
    > which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
    > case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
    > different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    > TIA,
    > Kevin.
    > P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
    > ask. ;-)
    >
    >
    >
    Neither is worth buying.

    Both will run kind of slow.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 23:16:49 -0600, Last Boy Scout
    <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:

    >Kevin Lawton wrote:
    >> Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    >> I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    >> word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power. The
    >> case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo, one
    >> floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by
    >> 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    >> PSU is rated at 200w.
    >> I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733 MHz
    >> and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    >> I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was wondering
    >> which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the small
    >> case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at a
    >> different location., so nothing will go to waste.
    >> TIA,
    >> Kevin.
    >> P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be best to
    >> ask. ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >Neither is worth buying.
    >
    >Both will run kind of slow.

    Completely disagree, it might take a stopwatch to even
    notice a speed difference from those and ANY other CPU for
    described uses. It is only an expensive waste to run an
    expensive, heat and energy wastefull system when the job
    doesn't require it.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    || micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted
    || on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    || PSU is rated at 200w.
    || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    || wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    || problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be
    || used in a bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go
    || to waste.
    || TIA,
    || Kevin.
    || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    || best to ask. ;-)
    ||
    ||
    ||
    | Neither is worth buying.
    |
    | Both will run kind of slow.

    Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and the Duron
    with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question was to
    determine which would be the better option to build into the rather small PC
    case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU output (it
    is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect that
    whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also produce less heat ?
    Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system will be
    running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just used for
    web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing / archiving. I would
    have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing video
    editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is this not
    so ?
    Cheers,
    Kevin.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    > | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    > || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    > || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    > || micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted
    > || on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    > || PSU is rated at 200w.
    > || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    > || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    > || wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    > || problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be
    > || used in a bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go
    > || to waste.
    > || TIA,
    > || Kevin.
    > || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    > || best to ask. ;-)
    > ||
    > ||
    > ||
    > | Neither is worth buying.
    > |
    > | Both will run kind of slow.
    >
    > Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    > I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and the Duron
    > with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question was to
    > determine which would be the better option to build into the rather small PC
    > case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU output (it
    > is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect that
    > whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also produce less heat ?
    > Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system will be
    > running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just used for
    > web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing / archiving. I would
    > have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing video
    > editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is this not
    > so ?
    > Cheers,
    > Kevin.
    >
    >
    >

    Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Last Boy Scout" <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote in message
    news:10pgetp156plca4@corp.supernews.com...
    > Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > > Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > > I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    > > word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of power.
    The
    > > case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a micro-ATX mobo,
    one
    > > floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is
    by
    > > 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    > > PSU is rated at 200w.
    > > I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III 733
    MHz
    > > and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > > I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    wondering
    > > which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating problems in the
    small
    > > case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be used in a bigger case at
    a
    > > different location., so nothing will go to waste.

    > Neither is worth buying.
    >
    > Both will run kind of slow.

    You can type faster than a 733Mhz P3? The machine is for WORD PROCESSING.

    I'd go with the P3 if heat was the biggest issue.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    David Maynard wrote:

    > Kevin Lawton wrote:
    >
    >> Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    >> | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    >> || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    >> || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    >> || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    >> || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    >> || micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted
    >> || on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    >> || PSU is rated at 200w.
    >> || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    >> || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    >> || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    >> || wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    >> || problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be
    >> || used in a bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go
    >> || to waste.
    >> || TIA,
    >> || Kevin.
    >> || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    >> || best to ask. ;-)
    >> ||
    >> ||
    >> ||
    >> | Neither is worth buying.
    >> |
    >> | Both will run kind of slow.
    >>
    >> Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    >> I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and the
    >> Duron
    >> with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question was to
    >> determine which would be the better option to build into the rather
    >> small PC
    >> case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU
    >> output (it
    >> is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect that
    >> whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also produce less
    >> heat ?
    >> Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system
    >> will be
    >> running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just
    >> used for
    >> web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing / archiving. I
    >> would
    >> have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing video
    >> editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is
    >> this not
    >> so ?
    >> Cheers,
    >> Kevin.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
    >
    Via C3 Processors. Mini-ITX. I dont thing a PIII is much cooler than a
    Athlon 64 Processor. It would be nice if Intel would make a Centrino
    motherboard for M-ATX motherboards. I heard they are selling some
    motherboards with a chipset they call Shelton in 2 countries in Asia
    that is basically a PIII/Centrino system.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Last Boy Scout wrote:

    > David Maynard wrote:
    >
    >> Kevin Lawton wrote:
    >>
    >>> Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    >>> | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    >>> || Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    >>> || I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet and
    >>> || word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons of
    >>> || power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:- takes a
    >>> || micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or DVD mounted
    >>> || on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and one rear.
    >>> || PSU is rated at 200w.
    >>> || I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    >>> || 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    >>> || I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    >>> || wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    >>> || problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo will be
    >>> || used in a bigger case at a different location., so nothing will go
    >>> || to waste.
    >>> || TIA,
    >>> || Kevin.
    >>> || P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would be
    >>> || best to ask. ;-)
    >>> ||
    >>> ||
    >>> ||
    >>> | Neither is worth buying.
    >>> |
    >>> | Both will run kind of slow.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    >>> I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and
    >>> the Duron
    >>> with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question
    >>> was to
    >>> determine which would be the better option to build into the rather
    >>> small PC
    >>> case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU
    >>> output (it
    >>> is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect that
    >>> whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also produce less
    >>> heat ?
    >>> Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system
    >>> will be
    >>> running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just
    >>> used for
    >>> web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing / archiving. I
    >>> would
    >>> have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing
    >>> video
    >>> editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is
    >>> this not
    >>> so ?
    >>> Cheers,
    >>> Kevin.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >> Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
    >>
    > Via C3 Processors. Mini-ITX.

    Besides being slower than a dead dog in mud, he doesn't have one and
    doesn't plan on buying anything.

    > I dont thing a PIII is much cooler than a
    > Athlon 64 Processor.

    Anything consuming power can get 'hot' if you don't cool it but the issue
    is how much power does it dissipate and his P-III 733 has a max thermal
    design spec, under full load, of a whopping 19 watts vs 89 for an Athlon 64.

    Needless to say, it's easier to get 19 watts out of a small case than it is
    to get 89 watts out and I seriously doubt a pair of 60mm fans, one front
    and one rear, could effectively handle much more.

    Btw, a Model 7, 1.75 Vcore, 1 gig Duron is around 46 watts.

    > It would be nice if Intel would make a Centrino
    > motherboard for M-ATX motherboards. I heard they are selling some
    > motherboards with a chipset they call Shelton in 2 countries in Asia
    > that is basically a PIII/Centrino system.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 23:35:12 -0600, Last Boy Scout
    <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:


    >> Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
    >>
    >Via C3 Processors. Mini-ITX. I dont thing a PIII is much cooler than a
    > Athlon 64 Processor.

    Via C3 has horribly low performance. While many uses don't
    require much CPU muscle, a C3 is just cutting it too close,
    they're not much faster for typical uses than a Celeron 500.

    A P3 is MUCH cooler than an A64. To give you an idea, I've
    built P3 systems with only passive heatsinks, they can run
    at less than 30W full load and less than 12W during typical
    use in a system with ACPI/HALT-idle cooling working, which
    it typically did on any contemporary motherboards.

    If you wanted to really push a P3, say overvolting a
    Tualatin to run it at 1.5GHz, then things change quite a
    bit, it may not then be much if any cooler especially
    considering that the A64 could be underclocked to provide
    comparable performance, but generally speaking, a P3 was/is
    one of the best compromises possible for typical, light-duty
    usage.


    >It would be nice if Intel would make a Centrino
    >motherboard for M-ATX motherboards. I heard they are selling some
    >motherboards with a chipset they call Shelton in 2 countries in Asia
    >that is basically a PIII/Centrino system.

    Yes, it would've been nice if they'd scrapped the P4 after
    the Northwood too, but since they didn't it'd be a
    premium-priced solution... remember that we're talking
    about Intel.
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    David Maynard <dmayn@ev1.net> wrote:
    | Last Boy Scout wrote:
    |
    || David Maynard wrote:
    ||
    ||| Kevin Lawton wrote:
    |||
    |||| Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    ||||| Kevin Lawton wrote:
    |||||| Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    |||||| I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet
    |||||| and word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons
    |||||| of power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:-
    |||||| takes a micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or
    |||||| DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and
    |||||| one rear.
    |||||| PSU is rated at 200w.
    |||||| I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    |||||| 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    |||||| I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    |||||| wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    |||||| problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo
    |||||| will be used in a bigger case at a different location., so
    |||||| nothing will go to waste.
    |||||| TIA,
    |||||| Kevin.
    |||||| P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would
    |||||| be best to ask. ;-)
    ||||||
    ||||||
    ||||||
    ||||| Neither is worth buying.
    |||||
    ||||| Both will run kind of slow.
    ||||
    |||| Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    |||| I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and
    |||| the Duron
    |||| with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question
    |||| was to
    |||| determine which would be the better option to build into the rather
    |||| small PC
    |||| case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU
    |||| output (it
    |||| is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect
    |||| that whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also
    |||| produce less heat ?
    |||| Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system
    |||| will be
    |||| running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just
    |||| used for
    |||| web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing /
    |||| archiving. I would
    |||| have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing
    |||| video
    |||| editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is
    |||| this not
    |||| so ?
    |||| Cheers,
    |||| Kevin.
    ||||
    ||||
    ||||
    |||
    ||| Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
    |||
    || Via C3 Processors. Mini-ITX.
    |
    | Besides being slower than a dead dog in mud, he doesn't have one and
    | doesn't plan on buying anything.
    |
    || I dont thing a PIII is much cooler than a
    || Athlon 64 Processor.
    |
    | Anything consuming power can get 'hot' if you don't cool it but the
    | issue is how much power does it dissipate and his P-III 733 has a max
    | thermal design spec, under full load, of a whopping 19 watts vs 89
    | for an Athlon 64.
    |
    | Needless to say, it's easier to get 19 watts out of a small case than
    | it is to get 89 watts out and I seriously doubt a pair of 60mm fans,
    | one front and one rear, could effectively handle much more.
    |
    | Btw, a Model 7, 1.75 Vcore, 1 gig Duron is around 46 watts.

    Thanks, David, your answer quantifies the situation nicely.
    I'll use the 733 MHz P-III in this small case.
    19 watts shouldn't be so difficult to handle and won't stress the PSU as
    much either (it is a small one, only 200w). I understand that the Intel
    chips are able to handle cooling problems more 'elegantly' than the AMD ones
    as well (Toms hardware did a video clip illustrating this) - so it should be
    quite safe in the small case.
    I'll leave the 1 GHz Duron on one side untill a case turns up big enough to
    take 80mm fans - and handle the 46 watts of heat.
    Thanks again,
    Kevin.

    || It would be nice if Intel would make a Centrino
    || motherboard for M-ATX motherboards. I heard they are selling some
    || motherboards with a chipset they call Shelton in 2 countries in Asia
    || that is basically a PIII/Centrino system.
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Kevin Lawton wrote:

    > David Maynard <dmayn@ev1.net> wrote:
    > | Last Boy Scout wrote:
    > |
    > || David Maynard wrote:
    > ||
    > ||| Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > |||
    > |||| Last Boy Scout <eggbtr@charter.net> wrote:
    > ||||| Kevin Lawton wrote:
    > |||||| Looking for opinions on the best alternative.
    > |||||| I'm putting together a small 'workstation' for e-mail, internet
    > |||||| and word-processing use - nothing strenuous so I don't need tons
    > |||||| of power. The case I'm using is one of those 'mini' jobbies:-
    > |||||| takes a micro-ATX mobo, one floppy, one hard drive and a CD or
    > |||||| DVD mounted on its side. Airflow is by 60mm fans, one front and
    > |||||| one rear.
    > |||||| PSU is rated at 200w.
    > |||||| I have two CPU/mobo combinations available - one's an Intel P-III
    > |||||| 733 MHz and the other an AMD Duron 1GHz.
    > |||||| I'm looking for reliability rather than out-and-out speed and was
    > |||||| wondering which CPU was least likely to encounter overheating
    > |||||| problems in the small case I'll be using. The other CPU/mobo
    > |||||| will be used in a bigger case at a different location., so
    > |||||| nothing will go to waste.
    > |||||| TIA,
    > |||||| Kevin.
    > |||||| P.S.: Sorry for the cross-posting - not too sure which NG would
    > |||||| be best to ask. ;-)
    > ||||||
    > ||||||
    > ||||||
    > ||||| Neither is worth buying.
    > |||||
    > ||||| Both will run kind of slow.
    > ||||
    > |||| Thanks, but maybe you slightly misunderstood.
    > |||| I am buying nothing extra. I already have both the Pentium-III and
    > |||| the Duron
    > |||| with their motherboards ready to mount in the system. The question
    > |||| was to
    > |||| determine which would be the better option to build into the rather
    > |||| small PC
    > |||| case I have available - which is a bit limited on cooling and PSU
    > |||| output (it
    > |||| is too small to take a larger PSU or bigger fans). I would expect
    > |||| that whichever option uses less power from the PSU will also
    > |||| produce less heat ?
    > |||| Am a little bit worried by the 'run kinda slow' warning. The system
    > |||| will be
    > |||| running Windows 2000 with all unnecessary services stopped and just
    > |||| used for
    > |||| web browsing, email, word processing and photo editing /
    > |||| archiving. I would
    > |||| have hoped that, provided I'm not playing the latest games or doing
    > |||| video
    > |||| editing, almost a gigahertz of processing power would be ample - is
    > |||| this not
    > |||| so ?
    > |||| Cheers,
    > |||| Kevin.
    > ||||
    > ||||
    > ||||
    > |||
    > ||| Yes, both are fine for the uses you described.
    > |||
    > || Via C3 Processors. Mini-ITX.
    > |
    > | Besides being slower than a dead dog in mud, he doesn't have one and
    > | doesn't plan on buying anything.
    > |
    > || I dont thing a PIII is much cooler than a
    > || Athlon 64 Processor.
    > |
    > | Anything consuming power can get 'hot' if you don't cool it but the
    > | issue is how much power does it dissipate and his P-III 733 has a max
    > | thermal design spec, under full load, of a whopping 19 watts vs 89
    > | for an Athlon 64.
    > |
    > | Needless to say, it's easier to get 19 watts out of a small case than
    > | it is to get 89 watts out and I seriously doubt a pair of 60mm fans,
    > | one front and one rear, could effectively handle much more.
    > |
    > | Btw, a Model 7, 1.75 Vcore, 1 gig Duron is around 46 watts.
    >
    > Thanks, David, your answer quantifies the situation nicely.
    > I'll use the 733 MHz P-III in this small case.
    > 19 watts shouldn't be so difficult to handle and won't stress the PSU as

    Amazing how we used to worry about getting a good enough heatsink for the
    things. hehe Seems down right trivial compared to 89 watts, don't it?

    > much either (it is a small one, only 200w). I understand that the Intel
    > chips are able to handle cooling problems more 'elegantly' than the AMD ones
    > as well (Toms hardware did a video clip illustrating this) - so it should be
    > quite safe in the small case.

    Yes. P-IIIs will 'lock up'. They do an internal shutdown (stops clock) if
    internal temp goes over a preset threshold, not that I recommend 'testing'
    that feature ;)

    > I'll leave the 1 GHz Duron on one side untill a case turns up big enough to
    > take 80mm fans - and handle the 46 watts of heat.

    Btw, the model 7 was the only Duron I had spec sheets for, off hand, and
    I'm not sure what the consumption is on the later models (or even if it
    changed). But it would still be more than the P-III.

    > Thanks again,
    > Kevin.

    You're quite welcome.

    >
    > || It would be nice if Intel would make a Centrino
    > || motherboard for M-ATX motherboards. I heard they are selling some
    > || motherboards with a chipset they call Shelton in 2 countries in Asia
    > || that is basically a PIII/Centrino system.
    >
    >
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