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Copying old files to new system

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 29, 2004 10:22:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The HD
on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want to
transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these files? I
figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and copy stuff over.
That works easy enough for data but what about the programs? Do all the old
programs have to be reinstalled?

More about : copying files system

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 29, 2004 10:26:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

jch wrote:
> I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The HD
> on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want to
> transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these files? I
> figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and copy stuff over.
> That works easy enough for data but what about the programs? Do all the old
> programs have to be reinstalled?
>
>

You didn't say what O.S. you're running but the generic answer is to clone
the old drive to the new drive and then do an 'upgrade' install to redetect
the hardware of the new system.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 12:01:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
news:10o5ke57ietqo86@corp.supernews.com...
> jch wrote:
>> I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The
>> HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want
>> to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these
>> files? I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and
>> copy stuff over. That works easy enough for data but what about the
>> programs? Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>
> You didn't say what O.S. you're running but the generic answer is to clone
> the old drive to the new drive and then do an 'upgrade' install to
> redetect the hardware of the new system.

I would be going from Win Me to Win 2000. I'm helping a friend out so it is
actually their system. I'd rather not have to reinstall all their existing
apps. Because of the change in OS, I don't think the clone method would
work. If it does, please tell me how. I was hoping there'd be an easy
process to upgrade a system and go from one HD to another. Any pointers?
Thanks.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 12:01:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

jch wrote:

> "David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
> news:10o5ke57ietqo86@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>jch wrote:
>>
>>>I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The
>>>HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want
>>>to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these
>>>files? I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and
>>>copy stuff over. That works easy enough for data but what about the
>>>programs? Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>>
>>You didn't say what O.S. you're running but the generic answer is to clone
>>the old drive to the new drive and then do an 'upgrade' install to
>>redetect the hardware of the new system.
>
>
> I would be going from Win Me to Win 2000. I'm helping a friend out so it is
> actually their system. I'd rather not have to reinstall all their existing
> apps. Because of the change in OS, I don't think the clone method would
> work. If it does, please tell me how. I was hoping there'd be an easy
> process to upgrade a system and go from one HD to another. Any pointers?
> Thanks.
>
>

Well, the 'upgrade' to Windows 2000 makes it a moot issue as you can't
'upgrade' Millennium to Windows 2000. Millennium is newer than Windows 2000
so it doesn't know how to.

It would work on a supported upgrade path though. You simply clone the old
hard drive to the new one and then upgrade on the new hardware.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 3:02:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Yes, the programs have to be reinstalled.

--
DaveW



"jch" <JCH@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:Jmzgd.236730$as2.156377@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The HD
> on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want to
> transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these files?
> I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and copy stuff
> over. That works easy enough for data but what about the programs? Do all
> the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 3:02:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

DaveW wrote:

> Yes, the programs have to be reinstalled.
>

Wrong.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 5:32:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

jch:

> I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one.
> The HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that
> I'll want to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to
> transfer these files?

If you buy a retail drive it will come with software that will transfer
everything (clone) to the new drive. If you buy an OEM drive, you can
download the software from the drive manufacturer's website.

> I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC
> as a slave and copy stuff over.

Not copy, clone.

> Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?

No.
--
Mac Cool
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 5:32:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"Mac Cool" <Mac@2cool.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9591DB1CF83ECMacCool@24.25.9.42...
> jch:
>
>> I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one.
>> The HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that
>> I'll want to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to
>> transfer these files?
>
> If you buy a retail drive it will come with software that will transfer
> everything (clone) to the new drive. If you buy an OEM drive, you can
> download the software from the drive manufacturer's website.
>
>> I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC
>> as a slave and copy stuff over.
>
> Not copy, clone.
>
>> Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>
> No.

Thanks for the replies. I guess I wasn't clear. The 'new' system already has
Win 2k installed. I don't believe anything else is on the HD (I haven't seen
it yet so I don't know). What I need to do is transfer the contents of the
old HD to the new HD. I don't see how I can re-image the new HD since that
would wipe out Win 2k. I don't know if I'll have access to the OS CDs or
not. If I do have the Win 2k CDs then what I gather is being suggested here
is that I re-image the new drive and then install the Win 2k over Win ME. Is
that correct? Would that insure the apps would all run?? Is this the best
way to proceed? Thanks.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 5:58:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 19:47:48 -0500, David Maynard
<dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote:

>jch wrote:
>
>> "David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
>> news:10o5ke57ietqo86@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>jch wrote:
>>>
>>>>I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The
>>>>HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want
>>>>to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these
>>>>files? I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and
>>>>copy stuff over. That works easy enough for data but what about the
>>>>programs? Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>>>
>>>You didn't say what O.S. you're running but the generic answer is to clone
>>>the old drive to the new drive and then do an 'upgrade' install to
>>>redetect the hardware of the new system.
>>
>>
>> I would be going from Win Me to Win 2000. I'm helping a friend out so it is
>> actually their system. I'd rather not have to reinstall all their existing
>> apps. Because of the change in OS, I don't think the clone method would
>> work. If it does, please tell me how. I was hoping there'd be an easy
>> process to upgrade a system and go from one HD to another. Any pointers?
>> Thanks.
>>
>>
>
>Well, the 'upgrade' to Windows 2000 makes it a moot issue as you can't
>'upgrade' Millennium to Windows 2000. Millennium is newer than Windows 2000
>so it doesn't know how to.
>
>It would work on a supported upgrade path though. You simply clone the old
>hard drive to the new one and then upgrade on the new hardware.

Untrue, you can upgrade ME to 2K, it just isn't "supported".
The best course to take here might be to clone the old
system's HDD to the new HDD, then try to upgrade and see how
it goes... at worst the new drive just gets formatted and
it's back to square one again.

<the rest directed at OP>

Even so, IMO it might be worthwhile to do a clean install of
Win2K instead of having remnants of WinME mucking up a
perfectly good (2K) OS, especially on a new/unproven system
it may be easier to troubleshoot any potential problems that
arise... but still trying to upgrade install Win2K over ME
would only be an hour's time wasted, and it just might work
fine except for all those drivers and apps that wouldn't
have worked with 2K to begin with, regardless of the route
taken to get 2K running.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 30, 2004 8:28:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 22:06:10 -0400, "jch" <JCH@nospam.com>
wrote:


>Thanks for the replies. I guess I wasn't clear. The 'new' system already has
>Win 2k installed.

Then you might consider first making a partition backup of
the new system's OS partition, just in case you might want
to revert back to it.

>I don't believe anything else is on the HD (I haven't seen
>it yet so I don't know). What I need to do is transfer the contents of the
>old HD to the new HD.

OK, but that's not quite true. You need the files AND the
configuration info extracted from the old OS and put into
the new OS, which isn't nearly so simple. If it were only a
matter of copying files I'd suggest simply doing so over a
LAN, since there would be no need to swap hard drives
around.


> I don't see how I can re-image the new HD since that
>would wipe out Win 2k.

Correct

>I don't know if I'll have access to the OS CDs or
>not.

Well it's pretty important to have "some" way to
install/reinstall the OS... If the box just comes with win2k
installed and no way to even provide the installation files
whenever Win2K needs to configure/reconfigure something then
you already have a problem before even considering migration
of anything from the old WinME based system. There may be a
folder with part or all of the Win2K installation files in
it. If that is the case I suggest you burn those to a
bootable CD before doing anything else... and check on
whether the system even has a license to run Win2K. If it's
a system-restore CD common on some OEM boxes, you have
similar situation that you need the OS installation files on
CD (backed up somehow) and perhaps also need the
"installation front-end" files themselves too, they wouldn't
have to exist at all outside of the OEM restoration
environment. Determine the status of the Win2K files before
doing anything else.


>If I do have the Win 2k CDs then what I gather is being suggested here
>is that I re-image the new drive and then install the Win 2k over Win ME. Is
>that correct?

You'd image/clone/etc the old WinME system's drive to the
new system's HDD, plug-n-play the WinME installation till it
was working 100% on the new box. THEN run the Win2K
compatibility checker (available somewhere on Microsoft's
website) to see what won't work and/or needs patched or
upgraded. At that point it might also be handy to have the
Win2K drivers for hardware on the system, you could go ahead
and make a folder on the HDD and copy them from (wherever)
to the folder in a decompressed,
ready-to-browse-to-via-wizard for when Win2K detects
devices.

>Would that insure the apps would all run??

No. It will be the greatest chance of having as many apps
as possible work on Win2K, short of reinstalling them _IF_
they even support Win2K, else you might need newer version
of the app or a patch, etc.


>Is this the best
>way to proceed? Thanks.

Well since this is a big project with a lot of variables you
might want to get the system to the most modern Win2k, by
slipstreaming the Service Pack 4 files into the Win2k
installation files, making a 2nd CD with this Win2KSP4 on it
so when you do the upgrade it'll be current and have more
bugs fixed, which may not help during the upgrade process,
but might?

There is something else that "might" be helpful, which is to
use Regedit on the WinME system to export some registry keys
with the hope that, if you needed to start with the original
WIn2k install on the new box or reinstall win2k clean
instead of a WinME upgrade, that there is a "chance" that
copying over the application files (their respective
folders, often found in the C:\Program Files folder for
example) from the old box to the new one, then merging
related registry keys exported from WinME, into the Win2k
registry, might get them working. That could be a very
tedious process and one might evaluate how important an
application really is before undertaking it, but in some
cases it's not hard to do it and it can work.

Where to start exporting registry keys is a difficult thing
to guesstimate, you might want

HKEY_CURRENT_USER | SOFTWARE
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE | SOFTWARE
HKEY_USERS | SOFTWARE

You'd be exporting those entire subkeys w/all subkeys under
them, or you could pick and choose specific subkeys.
Either way at some point you might need weed though the keys
if you wanted to merge registry info, instead of merging the
entire exported files which would contain a lot on
non-relevant (and potentially bad?) info. Then if you ran
the apps that were copied over and they complained about
files missing, if you can locate those files still present
on the WinME system you can copy them over, either to the
\Windows (or \WINNT) folder, \Windows\system folder, or
somewhere in \Program Files\Common Files folder if simply
copying the file(s) to the folder the application resides
in, doesn't work. This is a pretty vague description and
that's all I can do, sometimes something like this works but
it can need be done slightly differently on a case-by-case
basis and still some apps simply won't work for unknown
reasons or simply not being supported under Win2K. If any
of those apps have patches or upgrades downloadable from the
software manufacturer you might try installing those
patches/upgrades even if the app doesn't work, it might help
(or might not).

Basically what you're doing is thinking about what happens
when one of these apps loads, whether it's looking for files
or registry entries and trying to duplicate them manually on
the new box from the old. Of course this is if the Win2K
upgrade doesn't work, if it does then none of this is
necessary. Since you have two systems you need not disturb
the old one, will have it continually available and as such
it may be much easier to go ahead and network them until
you're completely finished.

It might be good to make as many partition backups,
incrementally as you go along this process, as possible. If
you have a 2nd partition on the new system you can leave a
lot of the bulk files (like Win2K installation files) there
to make partition backups smaller.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 31, 2004 2:54:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

kony wrote:

> On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 19:47:48 -0500, David Maynard
> <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote:
>
>
>>jch wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
>>>news:10o5ke57ietqo86@corp.supernews.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>jch wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I'll be bringing up a new system soon to replace an out dated one. The
>>>>>HD on the older system contains all the programs and data that I'll want
>>>>>to transfer to the new PC. What is the best method to transfer these
>>>>>files? I figure I'll install the old HD in the new PC as a slave and
>>>>>copy stuff over. That works easy enough for data but what about the
>>>>>programs? Do all the old programs have to be reinstalled?
>>>>
>>>>You didn't say what O.S. you're running but the generic answer is to clone
>>>>the old drive to the new drive and then do an 'upgrade' install to
>>>>redetect the hardware of the new system.
>>>
>>>
>>>I would be going from Win Me to Win 2000. I'm helping a friend out so it is
>>>actually their system. I'd rather not have to reinstall all their existing
>>>apps. Because of the change in OS, I don't think the clone method would
>>>work. If it does, please tell me how. I was hoping there'd be an easy
>>>process to upgrade a system and go from one HD to another. Any pointers?
>>>Thanks.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>Well, the 'upgrade' to Windows 2000 makes it a moot issue as you can't
>>'upgrade' Millennium to Windows 2000. Millennium is newer than Windows 2000
>>so it doesn't know how to.
>>
>>It would work on a supported upgrade path though. You simply clone the old
>>hard drive to the new one and then upgrade on the new hardware.
>
>
> Untrue, you can upgrade ME to 2K, it just isn't "supported".

When I tried a WinME to Win2K upgrade the Win2K CD said not supported and
refused to do it but I'd be interested to hear how you did it when the CD
refuses to proceed with it.

> The best course to take here might be to clone the old
> system's HDD to the new HDD, then try to upgrade and see how
> it goes... at worst the new drive just gets formatted and
> it's back to square one again.

I don't understand. Why would you be concerned the hard drive might get
formatted, even 'worst case', if you're saying the upgrade would proceed as
an upgrade?


> <the rest directed at OP>
>
> Even so, IMO it might be worthwhile to do a clean install of
> Win2K instead of having remnants of WinME mucking up a
> perfectly good (2K) OS, especially on a new/unproven system
> it may be easier to troubleshoot any potential problems that
> arise... but still trying to upgrade install Win2K over ME
> would only be an hour's time wasted, and it just might work
> fine except for all those drivers and apps that wouldn't
> have worked with 2K to begin with, regardless of the route
> taken to get 2K running.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 31, 2004 10:18:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 00:54:03 -0500, David Maynard
<dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote:


>> Untrue, you can upgrade ME to 2K, it just isn't "supported".
>
>When I tried a WinME to Win2K upgrade the Win2K CD said not supported and
>refused to do it but I'd be interested to hear how you did it when the CD
>refuses to proceed with it.

Well I don't run WinME on anything and do clean Win2k
installs, BUT when I googled it I found several reports from
those who did upgrade win2k over ME. Perhaps if the CD
refuses then there's a switch or booting to CD would work, I
don't know.

>
>> The best course to take here might be to clone the old
>> system's HDD to the new HDD, then try to upgrade and see how
>> it goes... at worst the new drive just gets formatted and
>> it's back to square one again.
>
>I don't understand. Why would you be concerned the hard drive might get
>formatted, even 'worst case', if you're saying the upgrade would proceed as
>an upgrade?

Perhaps the apps won't work under 2K or installation CDs are
found, or whatever the reason, if the decision is made to do
a clean install. If it weren't for salvage of the apps the
clean install would be preferred.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 31, 2004 10:38:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

kony wrote:

> On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 00:54:03 -0500, David Maynard
> <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote:
>
>
>
>>>Untrue, you can upgrade ME to 2K, it just isn't "supported".
>>
>>When I tried a WinME to Win2K upgrade the Win2K CD said not supported and
>>refused to do it but I'd be interested to hear how you did it when the CD
>>refuses to proceed with it.
>
>
> Well I don't run WinME on anything and do clean Win2k
> installs, BUT when I googled it I found several reports from
> those who did upgrade win2k over ME.

Well, I see people who installed Win2k and then copied data files from Me
over calling that an 'upgrade' so without seeing whatever links you're
talking about I couldn't say whether it was the kind of 'upgrade' we're
talking about or not.

> Perhaps if the CD
> refuses then there's a switch or booting to CD would work, I
> don't know.

Perhaps. But until I knew what someone was calling an 'upgrade', what
tricks they were playing, and if it 'worked' I wouldn't make definitive
claims that one can do it.


>>>The best course to take here might be to clone the old
>>>system's HDD to the new HDD, then try to upgrade and see how
>>>it goes... at worst the new drive just gets formatted and
>>>it's back to square one again.
>>
>>I don't understand. Why would you be concerned the hard drive might get
>>formatted, even 'worst case', if you're saying the upgrade would proceed as
>>an upgrade?
>
>
> Perhaps the apps won't work under 2K or installation CDs are
> found, or whatever the reason, if the decision is made to do
> a clean install. If it weren't for salvage of the apps the
> clean install would be preferred.

That's the case with most upgrades.
!