Should I be worried about my HDD temps?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have a homebuilt Biostar iDEQ 200N:

http://www.biostar.com.tw/products/barebone/ideq/200n/index.php3

It's a SFF PC that's low on space, so my two hard drives
are in very close quarters without a lot of airflow. I
have a 10,000 RPM 74GB WD Raptor (SATA) as my WinXP boot
disk and a 7,200 RPM 250GB WD (IDE) data drive.

Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm wondering if
I should do anything to cool them down. I recently bolted
a Vantec HDC-502A to my Raptor, but reviews suggest these
coolers have relatively little impact, reducing the temp
by just a couple of degrees under heavy load:

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cooling/Vantec_HDC_1.html

So I guess I'm wondering if drive cooling is really that
important, or are modern drives designed to run pretty hot?
How worried should I be about having a 10k Raptor right
below my data drive? Any tips for cooling in tight spaces?

Incidentally, I've never had any temp-related problems
that I'm aware of, so this is really a preventive question;
I'd like to know if by letting my drives get hot I'm
setting myself up for problems later.

Thanks.
9 answers Last reply
More about should worried temps
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Derek wrote:
    > I have a homebuilt Biostar iDEQ 200N:
    >
    > http://www.biostar.com.tw/products/barebone/ideq/200n/index.php3
    >
    > It's a SFF PC that's low on space, so my two hard drives
    > are in very close quarters without a lot of airflow. I
    > have a 10,000 RPM 74GB WD Raptor (SATA) as my WinXP boot
    > disk and a 7,200 RPM 250GB WD (IDE) data drive.
    >
    > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm wondering if
    > I should do anything to cool them down.

    What do you mean "very hot" ?
    Can you check the temp in the SMART data? Or do WD drives still lack
    the temperature sensor?

    If you can't comfortably leave your finger on the drive itself for
    whatever amount of time, you're setting yourself up for premature failure.


    -WD
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Harddrives are very temperature sensitive as far as their being able to
    sustain a long service life.. You should NOT have the harddrives right
    against each other, and if you are running two harddrives, including a
    Raptor which runs hotter due to its 10,000 rpm, you should have very good
    case cooling.

    --
    DaveW


    "Derek" <user@nospam.org> wrote in message
    news:2uvp7mF2fmg8sU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >I have a homebuilt Biostar iDEQ 200N:
    >
    > http://www.biostar.com.tw/products/barebone/ideq/200n/index.php3
    >
    > It's a SFF PC that's low on space, so my two hard drives
    > are in very close quarters without a lot of airflow. I
    > have a 10,000 RPM 74GB WD Raptor (SATA) as my WinXP boot
    > disk and a 7,200 RPM 250GB WD (IDE) data drive.
    >
    > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm wondering if
    > I should do anything to cool them down. I recently bolted
    > a Vantec HDC-502A to my Raptor, but reviews suggest these
    > coolers have relatively little impact, reducing the temp
    > by just a couple of degrees under heavy load:
    >
    > http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cooling/Vantec_HDC_1.html
    >
    > So I guess I'm wondering if drive cooling is really that
    > important, or are modern drives designed to run pretty hot?
    > How worried should I be about having a 10k Raptor right
    > below my data drive? Any tips for cooling in tight spaces?
    >
    > Incidentally, I've never had any temp-related problems
    > that I'm aware of, so this is really a preventive question;
    > I'd like to know if by letting my drives get hot I'm
    > setting myself up for problems later.
    >
    > Thanks.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 17:36:38 -0500, Derek <user@nospam.org>
    wrote:

    >I have a homebuilt Biostar iDEQ 200N:
    >
    >http://www.biostar.com.tw/products/barebone/ideq/200n/index.php3
    >
    >It's a SFF PC that's low on space, so my two hard drives
    >are in very close quarters without a lot of airflow. I
    >have a 10,000 RPM 74GB WD Raptor (SATA) as my WinXP boot
    >disk and a 7,200 RPM 250GB WD (IDE) data drive.
    >
    >Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm wondering if
    >I should do anything to cool them down. I recently bolted
    >a Vantec HDC-502A to my Raptor, but reviews suggest these
    >coolers have relatively little impact, reducing the temp
    >by just a couple of degrees under heavy load:
    >
    >http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cooling/Vantec_HDC_1.html
    >
    >So I guess I'm wondering if drive cooling is really that
    >important, or are modern drives designed to run pretty hot?
    >How worried should I be about having a 10k Raptor right
    >below my data drive? Any tips for cooling in tight spaces?
    >
    >Incidentally, I've never had any temp-related problems
    >that I'm aware of, so this is really a preventive question;
    >I'd like to know if by letting my drives get hot I'm
    >setting myself up for problems later.
    >
    >Thanks.

    "Very hot" does sound problematic.

    One thing you could try is cutting out the grill over the
    rear exhaust fan. It almost looks like there's even room for
    a larger fan but I can't be sure from pictures, and also
    unsure how much that would effect structural integrity of
    the chassis.
    http://www.hwextreme.com/reviews/barebones/biostar_ideq_200t_200n/images/4.jpg

    There looks to be no easy way to significantly increase
    cooling of the drives though, not without drastically,
    visually modifying the case, which is unfortunate but one of
    the tradeoffs, reasons why many people still build in larger
    cases. Perhaps adding a fan to the side-panel would help
    (moreso for the bottom drive), with a grill to make it more
    astheticallly pleasing.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Will Dormann wrote:
    > > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm
    > > wondering if I should do anything to cool them
    > > down.
    >
    > What do you mean "very hot" ? Can you check the temp
    > in the SMART data? Or do WD drives still lack the
    > temperature sensor?

    I fired up PC Wizard and (to my surprise) there was a
    temperature reading in the SMART data. I was not
    aware of this feature.

    Under moderate load my 7,200 RPM drive read about 43C
    and my Raptor was at 47C. I'll experiment some more
    when I get home tonight to see if those numbers rise
    under heavy load.

    What's a reasonable temperature? The WD site lists
    a max temperature of 55C for my drives, but I'm not
    sure if that refers to the drive temperature or the
    temperature of the environment it's operating in.

    > If you can't comfortably leave your finger on the
    > drive itself for whatever amount of time, you're
    > setting yourself up for premature failure.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Matt wrote:
    > > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm
    > > wondering if I should do anything to cool them
    > > down.
    >
    > Have you checked the WD site for detailed technical
    > docs? I believe those will have specifications for
    > operating temperatures.

    The WD site lists the max operating temperature as
    55C/131F, but I'm not sure if that refers to the
    drive temp (as returned in the SMART data) or the
    temp of the ambient conditions the drive operates
    in. PC Wizard returns about 47C in the SMART data
    for my Raptor (and 43C for my 250GB), which means
    I'm in the green, but I'm not sure how far to trust
    SMART (or PC Wizard for that matter).
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Derek wrote:
    > I fired up PC Wizard and (to my surprise) there was a
    > temperature reading in the SMART data. I was not
    > aware of this feature.
    >
    > Under moderate load my 7,200 RPM drive read about 43C
    > and my Raptor was at 47C. I'll experiment some more
    > when I get home tonight to see if those numbers rise
    > under heavy load.

    43C or lower is a good target.
    47C is not bad, but you may have a decreased life span of the drive. If
    it goes 50C or above, you definately want to increase the cooling.


    -WD
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 09:32:48 -0500, Derek <user@nospam.org>
    wrote:

    >Matt wrote:
    > > > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm
    > > > wondering if I should do anything to cool them
    > > > down.
    > >
    > > Have you checked the WD site for detailed technical
    > > docs? I believe those will have specifications for
    > > operating temperatures.
    >
    >The WD site lists the max operating temperature as
    >55C/131F, but I'm not sure if that refers to the
    >drive temp (as returned in the SMART data) or the
    >temp of the ambient conditions the drive operates
    >in.

    It is drive temp.

    >PC Wizard returns about 47C in the SMART data
    >for my Raptor (and 43C for my 250GB), which means
    >I'm in the green, but I'm not sure how far to trust
    >SMART (or PC Wizard for that matter).


    Keep in mind that there is a difference between "max temp
    our product can sustain" and "temp promoting longer
    lifespan". 47C is not alarmingly high but should be lowered
    if you want higher lifespan from the drive.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <2v1gsfF2gdjuqU1@uni-berlin.de>, user@nospam.org says...
    > Will Dormann wrote:
    > > > Both drives get very hot to the touch and I'm
    > > > wondering if I should do anything to cool them
    > > > down.
    > >
    > > What do you mean "very hot" ? Can you check the temp
    > > in the SMART data? Or do WD drives still lack the
    > > temperature sensor?
    >
    > I fired up PC Wizard and (to my surprise) there was a
    > temperature reading in the SMART data. I was not
    > aware of this feature.
    >
    > Under moderate load my 7,200 RPM drive read about 43C
    > and my Raptor was at 47C. I'll experiment some more
    > when I get home tonight to see if those numbers rise
    > under heavy load.
    >
    > What's a reasonable temperature? The WD site lists
    > a max temperature of 55C for my drives, but I'm not
    > sure if that refers to the drive temperature or the
    > temperature of the environment it's operating in.
    >
    > > If you can't comfortably leave your finger on the
    > > drive itself for whatever amount of time, you're
    > > setting yourself up for premature failure.
    >
    my Seagate SATA drive usually runs at 43. According to the Seagate web
    site, their new drives can run as high as 60. If Western Digital says
    55, and when you check it under heavy load it still hasn't gone above
    50, you probably don't have anything to worry about.

    Louise
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 09:26:22 -0500, Derek <user@nospam.org> wrote:

    > I fired up PC Wizard and (to my surprise) there was a
    > temperature reading in the SMART data. I was not
    > aware of this feature.
    >
    > Under moderate load my 7,200 RPM drive read about 43C
    > and my Raptor was at 47C. I'll experiment some more
    > when I get home tonight to see if those numbers rise
    > under heavy load.
    >
    > What's a reasonable temperature?

    Try to get it below 40°C
    My Seagate is around 31°C.
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