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Dead RAID - how to get my data back?

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 12:51:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Hey guys, I'm having a problem with my RAID. When originally
installing it I let Windows automatically pick drivers for it and
everything worked okay. Then, I filled it up over the course of a few
weeks with 465GB of data. Then, just recently, *something* happened,
and Windows installed a new driver. I've tried going back to the old
driver, but it won't recognize my array as anything other than an
unformatted partition. I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?
Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
avail.

More about : dead raid data back

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 1:11:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On 11 Nov 2004 21:51:33 -0800, cyde@umd.edu (Cyde Weys)
wrote:

>Hey guys, I'm having a problem with my RAID. When originally
>installing it I let Windows automatically pick drivers for it and
>everything worked okay. Then, I filled it up over the course of a few
>weeks with 465GB of data. Then, just recently, *something* happened,
>and Windows installed a new driver.

If you have windows auto-update turned on, disable it. This
may be an important first step, otherwise you might find
that "new" driver reappears again.


>I've tried going back to the old
>driver, but it won't recognize my array as anything other than an
>unformatted partition.

I don't recall the specifics of your array but is it
possible you simply had a drive failure-in-progress? That
might account for missing filesystem. Had you previously
been able to see files in DOS and can you now? That'd keep
the driver out of the equation. Didn't you look at the RAID
bios previously and get some kind of positive result from
that? Is the RAID bios showing everything in order now?

> I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
>box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
>should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
>are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
>level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?

Did you make any backups of the OS partition prior to onset
of the problem? If so then conceivably it'd be using the
"other" driver. I"m not so sure it's the driver though, is
there any chance you can disconnect those drives and see if
controller and (whichever, all?) drivers work properly at
all with different drives?

>Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
>tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
>avail.

if the driver is the problem then yes you'd need the
non-problematic driver to do anything about it in windows.
Recovery from DOS/other would depend on the support for that
other OS. You might focus on the recovery tool, what it
attempts to do. Typically the best type does not write to
the drives, only copying off any data found to different
drives. Having a tool recreate filesystems if it really was
some driver or windows config problem might not be
desirable.

I'd try to determine if all drives are healthy before doing
anything else, and if the array should be viable outside of
windows.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 4:02:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in news:D g29p0d781r7tt7j1vudtjq5lku0odqv3j@
4ax.com:

> On 11 Nov 2004 21:51:33 -0800, cyde@umd.edu (Cyde Weys)
> wrote:
>
>>Hey guys, I'm having a problem with my RAID. When originally
>>installing it I let Windows automatically pick drivers for it and
>>everything worked okay. Then, I filled it up over the course of a few
>>weeks with 465GB of data. Then, just recently, *something* happened,
>>and Windows installed a new driver.
>
> If you have windows auto-update turned on, disable it. This
> may be an important first step, otherwise you might find
> that "new" driver reappears again.

Okay I have auto-update turned off.

>>I've tried going back to the old
>>driver, but it won't recognize my array as anything other than an
>>unformatted partition.
>
> I don't recall the specifics of your array but is it
> possible you simply had a drive failure-in-progress? That
> might account for missing filesystem. Had you previously
> been able to see files in DOS and can you now? That'd keep
> the driver out of the equation. Didn't you look at the RAID
> bios previously and get some kind of positive result from
> that? Is the RAID bios showing everything in order now?

That's the problem - I'm not getting the RAID bios. It used to be that I'd
get the RAID bios (hit F4 to enter) during system boot up. Now, I don't.
Is this a more fundamental problem than not having the correct driver
installed? And if so, what do I do about it? My RAID card is getting
detected within Windows ... but is it not getting detected during boot up,
for whatever reason?

Also, I haven't tried looking at the files from DOS. How do you do that
exactly, hold F8 while booting up or something?

>> I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
>>box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
>>should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
>>are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
>>level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?
>
> Did you make any backups of the OS partition prior to onset
> of the problem? If so then conceivably it'd be using the
> "other" driver. I"m not so sure it's the driver though, is
> there any chance you can disconnect those drives and see if
> controller and (whichever, all?) drivers work properly at
> all with different drives?

I wish I had more drives :-D And no, I didn't make a backup of the OS
partition because it's too large (40GB). I do know what driver I was
previously using though - it shows up under "Unknown Manufacturer -
SCSI/RAID Host Controller". That may not be the problem though ... could
it be hard drive drivers? My hard drives are showing up using the driver
"WDC WD25 00JD-22HBB0 SCSI Disk Device" - and my drives are definitely
SATA, not SCSI. What's up with that that? I don't recall it being like
that before.

>>Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
>>tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
>>avail.
>
> if the driver is the problem then yes you'd need the
> non-problematic driver to do anything about it in windows.
> Recovery from DOS/other would depend on the support for that
> other OS. You might focus on the recovery tool, what it
> attempts to do. Typically the best type does not write to
> the drives, only copying off any data found to different
> drives. Having a tool recreate filesystems if it really was
> some driver or windows config problem might not be
> desirable.
>
> I'd try to determine if all drives are healthy before doing
> anything else, and if the array should be viable outside of
> windows.

How would I go about testing the drives for healthiness without losing data
integrity? They're healthy in that they show up as an unformatted
partition, ready to be "initialized". I don't know if storing data on them
works but I have no reason to assume that it wouldn't. Heck, everything
was working perfectly right up until the last reboot.

I think my problem is that the RAID bios isn't showing up at system boot
anymore. When it used to show up, everything was fine. When I was having
intermittent difficulties with the RAID being recognized sometimes and not
at others, when I saw the RAID bios prompt at startup I knew it was going
to work that time. Now, I never see the RAID bios. I think this is the
root of my problem. What is causing this? Is it a Windows driver issue,
or something more fundamental?

--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 4:41:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 13:02:46 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
<cyde@umd.edu> wrote:


>> I don't recall the specifics of your array but is it
>> possible you simply had a drive failure-in-progress? That
>> might account for missing filesystem. Had you previously
>> been able to see files in DOS and can you now? That'd keep
>> the driver out of the equation. Didn't you look at the RAID
>> bios previously and get some kind of positive result from
>> that? Is the RAID bios showing everything in order now?
>
>That's the problem - I'm not getting the RAID bios. It used to be that I'd
>get the RAID bios (hit F4 to enter) during system boot up. Now, I don't.
>Is this a more fundamental problem than not having the correct driver
>installed? And if so, what do I do about it? My RAID card is getting
>detected within Windows ... but is it not getting detected during boot up,
>for whatever reason?

Yes, if something is wrong with the raid bios it would
easily prevent anything positive from happening, it is
critical that the bios be working. Check jumpers, do
whatever seems prudent to get the RAID bios up, working, and
same version as used to create the array.

>
>Also, I haven't tried looking at the files from DOS. How do you do that
>exactly, hold F8 while booting up or something?

What filesystem?
FAT32 will work from DOS boot floppy.
NTFS, you might head over to http://www.sysinternals.com/
for a freeware read-only version of a NTFS "driver".


>
>>> I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
>>>box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
>>>should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
>>>are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
>>>level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?
>>
>> Did you make any backups of the OS partition prior to onset
>> of the problem? If so then conceivably it'd be using the
>> "other" driver. I"m not so sure it's the driver though, is
>> there any chance you can disconnect those drives and see if
>> controller and (whichever, all?) drivers work properly at
>> all with different drives?
>
>I wish I had more drives :-D And no, I didn't make a backup of the OS
>partition because it's too large (40GB).

You might consider trimming down the OS partition so that's
possible in the future.

> I do know what driver I was
>previously using though - it shows up under "Unknown Manufacturer -
>SCSI/RAID Host Controller". That may not be the problem though ... could
>it be hard drive drivers? My hard drives are showing up using the driver
>"WDC WD25 00JD-22HBB0 SCSI Disk Device" - and my drives are definitely
>SATA, not SCSI. What's up with that that? I don't recall it being like
>that before.

It's common for a RAID card/device to be called SCSI, I'd
not worry about that. IF it's different than previously
that might be something relating to the driver but it's a
secondary concern, get the raid bios working first.

>
>>>Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
>>>tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
>>>avail.
>>
>> if the driver is the problem then yes you'd need the
>> non-problematic driver to do anything about it in windows.
>> Recovery from DOS/other would depend on the support for that
>> other OS. You might focus on the recovery tool, what it
>> attempts to do. Typically the best type does not write to
>> the drives, only copying off any data found to different
>> drives. Having a tool recreate filesystems if it really was
>> some driver or windows config problem might not be
>> desirable.
>>
>> I'd try to determine if all drives are healthy before doing
>> anything else, and if the array should be viable outside of
>> windows.
>
>How would I go about testing the drives for healthiness without losing data
>integrity? They're healthy in that they show up as an unformatted
>partition, ready to be "initialized". I don't know if storing data on them
>works but I have no reason to assume that it wouldn't. Heck, everything
>was working perfectly right up until the last reboot.

Check with HDD manufacturer, perhaps an email being sure to
mention the "missing" data so they don't recommend something
logically destructive.

>
>I think my problem is that the RAID bios isn't showing up at system boot
>anymore. When it used to show up, everything was fine. When I was having
>intermittent difficulties with the RAID being recognized sometimes and not
>at others, when I saw the RAID bios prompt at startup I knew it was going
>to work that time. Now, I never see the RAID bios. I think this is the
>root of my problem. What is causing this? Is it a Windows driver issue,
>or something more fundamental?

It is not a windows driver issue.
Where is this bios loading from? You might've mentioned it
but I forgot... Is it integral to the motherboard bios or a
PCI card? If part of motherboard bios, did you update that?
Check main bios settings and jumpers either way.

If it's a card, also check if there are any jumpers. If the
bios was somehow lost then you might goto card manufacturers
(or possibly chip manufacturer's) website and get (hopefully
same version of) bios and reflash it. Anything that seems to
work may still pose a risk, you should try to salvage the
data before writing to the array at all.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 5:49:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
news:voe9p0hr0pub68b736tia57gb5jj9ier4j@4ax.com:


> Yes, if something is wrong with the raid bios it would
> easily prevent anything positive from happening, it is
> critical that the bios be working. Check jumpers, do
> whatever seems prudent to get the RAID bios up, working, and
> same version as used to create the array.

I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked before
and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with the hardware
in any kind of way.

>>Also, I haven't tried looking at the files from DOS. How do you do
>>that exactly, hold F8 while booting up or something?
>
> What filesystem?
> FAT32 will work from DOS boot floppy.
> NTFS, you might head over to http://www.sysinternals.com/
> for a freeware read-only version of a NTFS "driver".

Yeah, it's NTFS. I've downloaded "NTFSPro" - but I'm going to need to hunt
down a floppy disk somewhere before I get that to work :-) I haven't used
a floppy in years ...


>>I wish I had more drives :-D And no, I didn't make a backup of the OS
>>partition because it's too large (40GB).
>
> You might consider trimming down the OS partition so that's
> possible in the future.

Yeah, next fresh install I'll be doing that. What's a good size for the OS
partition? I'm thinking 4.4GB ... that way it can fit on a single DVD. Or
is that not large enough?

>> I do know what driver I was
>>previously using though - it shows up under "Unknown Manufacturer -
>>SCSI/RAID Host Controller". That may not be the problem though ...
>>could it be hard drive drivers? My hard drives are showing up using
>>the driver "WDC WD25 00JD-22HBB0 SCSI Disk Device" - and my drives are
>>definitely SATA, not SCSI. What's up with that that? I don't recall
>>it being like that before.
>
> It's common for a RAID card/device to be called SCSI, I'd
> not worry about that. IF it's different than previously
> that might be something relating to the driver but it's a
> secondary concern, get the raid bios working first.

I don't think it's different than it used to be.


> It is not a windows driver issue.
> Where is this bios loading from? You might've mentioned it
> but I forgot... Is it integral to the motherboard bios or a
> PCI card? If part of motherboard bios, did you update that?
> Check main bios settings and jumpers either way.

It's a PCI card. Its name is "Silicon Image SiI 3112 SATARaid Controller".

I have a driver CD that came with it. I'm looking through it ... it seems
to have some utilities that might prove useful. Would it be safe to update
the firmware on the card if I find a new one somewhere? Or could that lead
to dataloss?

> If it's a card, also check if there are any jumpers. If the
> bios was somehow lost then you might goto card manufacturers
> (or possibly chip manufacturer's) website and get (hopefully
> same version of) bios and reflash it. Anything that seems to
> work may still pose a risk, you should try to salvage the
> data before writing to the array at all.

Hrmm, how would I know what version of the RAID BIOS I used to store my
data in?


--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 5:57:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

I just found a SiI RAID utility on the driver CD and installed it.
I'm looking at the PDF directions and the screenshots show that the utility
detects the individual drives and then the RAID sets. When I run the
utility it just detects the individual drives that are hooked up to the
card. Is this significant, or is this just telling us something we already
knew?


--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 6:35:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:
> Hey guys, I'm having a problem with my RAID. When originally
> installing it I let Windows automatically pick drivers for it and
> everything worked okay. Then, I filled it up over the course of a few
> weeks with 465GB of data. Then, just recently, *something* happened,
> and Windows installed a new driver. I've tried going back to the old
> driver, but it won't recognize my array as anything other than an
> unformatted partition. I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
> box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
> should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
> are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
> level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?
> Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
> tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
> avail.

Good luck. Using striping gives you half the reliability at twice the cost.


--
Conor

Opinions personal, facts suspect.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 8:23:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
<cyde@umd.edu> wrote:


>
>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked before
>and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with the hardware
>in any kind of way.

If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
might consider buying another raid card if the
lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
bios is available.


>

>> You might consider trimming down the OS partition so that's
>> possible in the future.
>
>Yeah, next fresh install I'll be doing that. What's a good size for the OS
>partition? I'm thinking 4.4GB ... that way it can fit on a single DVD. Or
>is that not large enough?

I suppose it depends on what you leave on that partition,
including where you install apps and system restore on/off,
etc. 4.4GB is manageable, though you might aim a little
higher like 7GB, so you not only have a little more margin
but with the expectation that an imaging program like Ghost
or Driveimage should be able to reduce the size by at least
25%, though 30-40% is typical for "high" compression
providing it's the typical files, not a boatload of JPEGS or
other pre-compressed file formats.


>> It is not a windows driver issue.
>> Where is this bios loading from? You might've mentioned it
>> but I forgot... Is it integral to the motherboard bios or a
>> PCI card? If part of motherboard bios, did you update that?
>> Check main bios settings and jumpers either way.
>
>It's a PCI card. Its name is "Silicon Image SiI 3112 SATARaid Controller".


There's likely a bios on the Silicon Image website, though
again you ought to (guesstimate?) which version it ran
previously and use same bios version.

>
>I have a driver CD that came with it. I'm looking through it ... it seems
>to have some utilities that might prove useful. Would it be safe to update
>the firmware on the card if I find a new one somewhere? Or could that lead
>to dataloss?

yes it could lead to data loss. Flash same version whenever
possible. For valuable data I suggest not using a raid
controller at all unless one can secure the bios and have it
saved (somewhere else). Some people like to put a sticker
on the card with the bios version listed on it for easy
reference... whether it be the manufacturer or system
integrator/builder that adds this sticker.

>
>> If it's a card, also check if there are any jumpers. If the
>> bios was somehow lost then you might goto card manufacturers
>> (or possibly chip manufacturer's) website and get (hopefully
>> same version of) bios and reflash it. Anything that seems to
>> work may still pose a risk, you should try to salvage the
>> data before writing to the array at all.
>
>Hrmm, how would I know what version of the RAID BIOS I used to store my
>data in?

Guess? Based on date card arrived on market or purchase
date, you'd not want any bios with release data after that,
and if one data closely coincides with card age, it's also
probably newer than card. When all else fails choose
original bios, earliest version... if bios seems to "take"
but still no data, try a different bios version.

If your card is subject to bios loss i'd be questioning if
it's viable for use anymore too, you certainly dont' want to
have to go through this on a regular basis.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 8:28:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:57:55 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
<cyde@umd.edu> wrote:

> I just found a SiI RAID utility on the driver CD and installed it.
>I'm looking at the PDF directions and the screenshots show that the utility
>detects the individual drives and then the RAID sets. When I run the
>utility it just detects the individual drives that are hooked up to the
>card. Is this significant, or is this just telling us something we already
>knew?


If you're referring to the SiICfg for Medley,
(is what a PATA SiI card here came with)
There will be listings on the left-hand side for each drive,
and then a "Sets" category which should show the RAID
set(s), IIRC. The PATA SiI card I"m looking at right now
doesn't have any attached drives in a RAID set though so I
can't show an example of that, but here's one:
http://prestissimo.itbdns.com/image/siicfg.jpg
November 12, 2004 9:30:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 15:35:14 +0000, Conor <conor.turton@gmail.com>
wrote:

>> Hey guys, I'm having a problem with my RAID. When originally
>> installing it I let Windows automatically pick drivers for it and
>> everything worked okay. Then, I filled it up over the course of a few
>> weeks with 465GB of data. Then, just recently, *something* happened,
>> and Windows installed a new driver. I've tried going back to the old
>> driver, but it won't recognize my array as anything other than an
>> unformatted partition. I was sure never to click yes to any dialog
>> box that asked if I wanted to reformat the array, so all of my data
>> should be intact ... I just have no clue how to read it. Are there
>> are RAID tools out there that will look at the drives on a very low
>> level and try to figure out which driver was used to store the data?
>> Or would I need to get the driver working correctly before a recovery
>> tool had a chance of working? I tried reinstalling Windows, to no
>> avail.
>
>Good luck. Using striping gives you half the reliability at twice the cost.

this may help to retrieve data:
http://www.active-undelete.com/
--
Regards, SPAJKY ®
& visit my site @ http://www.spajky.vze.com
"Tualatin OC-ed / BX-Slot1 / inaudible setup!"
E-mail AntiSpam: remove ##
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 8:07:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:

> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
> <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>
> If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
> might consider buying another raid card if the
> lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
> it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
> be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
> bios is available.

It is EEPROM, btw.

Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...

AMD’s Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
AMD’s Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
Atmel’s AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
Megabit)
SST’s 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
SANYO’s LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
WinBound’s 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors

What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
lets me choose the BIOS image to flash. They don't have a very good
flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
*rollseyes*

What would cause a card to lose a BIOS like this, anyway? I had
intermittent periods in which the BIOS wouldn't show up at system
startup, and then all of a sudden it doesn't show up at all. The HDs
are still showing up as an unformatted RAID set in Windows though ...
this is all very confusing to me. The card isn't detected at startup
but it is detected in Windows?

Anyway, the card is pretty cheap (certainly cheaper than my 450GB of
data). So I may just buy another version of the same card and see how
that works out.

--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 8:07:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:

> kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
> news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:
>
>
>>On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
>><cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>>
>>If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
>>might consider buying another raid card if the
>>lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
>>it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
>>be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
>>bios is available.
>
>
> It is EEPROM, btw.
>
> Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
> figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
> to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>
> AMD’s Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
> AMD’s Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
> Atmel’s AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
> Megabit)
> SST’s 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
> SANYO’s LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
> WinBound’s 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
> STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
> STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
> STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>
> What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
> lets me choose the BIOS image to flash. They don't have a very good
> flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
> to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
> *rollseyes*

It wants to know which kind of flash chip your card uses. Picking the wrong
one can put you in even worse shape than you're already in.


> What would cause a card to lose a BIOS like this, anyway? I had
> intermittent periods in which the BIOS wouldn't show up at system
> startup, and then all of a sudden it doesn't show up at all. The HDs
> are still showing up as an unformatted RAID set in Windows though ...
> this is all very confusing to me. The card isn't detected at startup
> but it is detected in Windows?

The BIOS for the card isn't loading so the 'smarts', or at least part of
it, for RAID is not there but the controller hardware is so Windows see that.

Btw, what size does windows say the unformatted array is? Is it the right
size for two drives or only one?

Does your card come with a windows utility that shows the drives and their
array assignments and what their status is? Promise does, and is why I
asked. On theirs you can see each drive, ot's port assignment, array
assignment, and whether it's active or off-line, etc.

>
> Anyway, the card is pretty cheap (certainly cheaper than my 450GB of
> data). So I may just buy another version of the same card and see how
> that works out.

Frankly, I doubt the card's BIOS just suddenly vanished. BIOS not loading
is symptomatic of an IRQ conflict. At least that always kills a Promise
RAID controller. The other cause is not detecting any drives as there's no
reason to load RAID BIOS with no drives and it saves boot time. Maybe your
card doesn't load BIOS unless there are at least two drives since you can't
RAID with just one (Defective drive? Slow spin-up?).

See if windows says it's sharing an IRQ with something else and recheck
your BIOS settings. Maybe something in there changed you're not aware of.
Also, set PnP OS to "no." If that doesn't help, in the PnP section tell it
to reset data (which causes it to reassign IRQs). As a last ditch check
remove everything else and see if the RAID BIOS loads up when it's the only
thing there.

If not, it could be you lost a hard drive and, thinking it's the card, just
don't know it yet. Try the drives on a 'plain' IDE port and see if they're
detected. No need to boot, and don't, because the partitions won't make
sense and you can't read any data plus you don't want Windows writing
anything to them. It's just to verify they at least respond to the drive
type detection. Make sure you keep track of which one is on which
channel/port on the RAID card so you can put them back in the same place:
write 'drive 1' and 'drive 2' on them, or whatever identifier suits your fancy.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 10:56:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 05:07:17 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
<cyde@umd.edu> wrote:


>It is EEPROM, btw.
>
>Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
>figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
>to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>
>AMD’s Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
>AMD’s Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>Atmel’s AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
>Megabit)
>SST’s 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
>SANYO’s LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
>WinBound’s 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
>STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
>STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
>STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>
>What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
>lets me choose the BIOS image to flash. They don't have a very good
>flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
>to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
>*rollseyes*

Take out card, write down markings on the EEPROM, including
those under the sticker (if there is one).

If it came from SiI website, they can't know what EEPROM a
manufactuer used, they only make the chips & bios.

You are in a better position to tell us why it failed than
us, you.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 5:53:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pdvooo98bg6b5@corp.supernews.com:


> It wants to know which kind of flash chip your card uses. Picking the
> wrong one can put you in even worse shape than you're already in.

I figured as much, that's why I stopped and asked for help instead of going
ahead.

>> What would cause a card to lose a BIOS like this, anyway? I had
>> intermittent periods in which the BIOS wouldn't show up at system
>> startup, and then all of a sudden it doesn't show up at all. The HDs
>> are still showing up as an unformatted RAID set in Windows though ...
>> this is all very confusing to me. The card isn't detected at startup
>> but it is detected in Windows?
>
> The BIOS for the card isn't loading so the 'smarts', or at least part
> of it, for RAID is not there but the controller hardware is so Windows
> see that.
>
> Btw, what size does windows say the unformatted array is? Is it the
> right size for two drives or only one?

It sees it as the correct size.

> Does your card come with a windows utility that shows the drives and
> their array assignments and what their status is? Promise does, and is
> why I asked. On theirs you can see each drive, ot's port assignment,
> array assignment, and whether it's active or off-line, etc.

Yeah it does. What kind of info do you want off it? I'm not seeing port
assignment, array assignment, or active/off-line status ... just a lot of
stuff like "Current Mode", "Capacity", "Identify Data" (a huge random list
of hex code). I could take screenshots of all of the info if you think
that would help.

Ohh yeah, and there's this:

IRQ: 19
Bus: 0
Device: 11

From browsing the status lines it doesn't appear like anything is out of
whack.

>> Anyway, the card is pretty cheap (certainly cheaper than my 450GB of
>> data). So I may just buy another version of the same card and see
>> how
>
>> that works out.
>
> Frankly, I doubt the card's BIOS just suddenly vanished. BIOS not
> loading is symptomatic of an IRQ conflict. At least that always kills
> a Promise RAID controller. The other cause is not detecting any drives
> as there's no reason to load RAID BIOS with no drives and it saves
> boot time. Maybe your card doesn't load BIOS unless there are at least
> two drives since you can't RAID with just one (Defective drive? Slow
> spin-up?).

Ugh, I hope the problem isn't with my drives :-/

> See if windows says it's sharing an IRQ with something else and
> recheck your BIOS settings. Maybe something in there changed you're
> not aware of. Also, set PnP OS to "no." If that doesn't help, in the
> PnP section tell it to reset data (which causes it to reassign IRQs).
> As a last ditch check remove everything else and see if the RAID BIOS
> loads up when it's the only thing there.

How do I see what hardware is using which IRQ? Can that be done within
Windows, or do I have to do it from the system BIOS?

> If not, it could be you lost a hard drive and, thinking it's the card,
> just don't know it yet. Try the drives on a 'plain' IDE port and see
> if they're detected. No need to boot, and don't, because the
> partitions won't make sense and you can't read any data plus you don't
> want Windows writing anything to them. It's just to verify they at
> least respond to the drive type detection. Make sure you keep track of
> which one is on which channel/port on the RAID card so you can put
> them back in the same place: write 'drive 1' and 'drive 2' on them, or
> whatever identifier suits your fancy.

They're SATA drives, and I don't have any SATA connectors in my computer
besides the ones on my RAID card.


--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 6:28:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 14:53:34 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
<cyde@umd.edu> wrote:

>David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
>news:10pdvooo98bg6b5@corp.supernews.com:
>
>
>> It wants to know which kind of flash chip your card uses. Picking the
>> wrong one can put you in even worse shape than you're already in.
>
>I figured as much, that's why I stopped and asked for help instead of going
>ahead.

I "might" be wrong but suspect that if you just picked wrong
EEPROM it'd simply not work, or at worst garble the flash
and you'd simply need repeat process with correct EEPROM
identified/chosen.



>> Frankly, I doubt the card's BIOS just suddenly vanished. BIOS not
>> loading is symptomatic of an IRQ conflict. At least that always kills
>> a Promise RAID controller. The other cause is not detecting any drives
>> as there's no reason to load RAID BIOS with no drives and it saves
>> boot time. Maybe your card doesn't load BIOS unless there are at least
>> two drives since you can't RAID with just one (Defective drive? Slow
>> spin-up?).
>
>Ugh, I hope the problem isn't with my drives :-/

Probably one drive has to be connected to load the bios at
all. Try disconnecting all but one drive and see if the
bios appears. Do NOT make changes in the bios or write to
the drive for any reason, just see if it appears. If it
won't with one drive, try a different drive. It is very
unlikely that all drives failed, and any one of them
connected is enough to get the card to load it's bios IF
card & bios were/are working properly.

>
>> See if windows says it's sharing an IRQ with something else and
>> recheck your BIOS settings. Maybe something in there changed you're
>> not aware of. Also, set PnP OS to "no." If that doesn't help, in the
>> PnP section tell it to reset data (which causes it to reassign IRQs).
>> As a last ditch check remove everything else and see if the RAID BIOS
>> loads up when it's the only thing there.
>
>How do I see what hardware is using which IRQ? Can that be done within
>Windows, or do I have to do it from the system BIOS?

Had you made any changes to the system just prior to onset
of problem? Whereever card was installed previously, same
slot, should still work if no other system parameters are
changed. The array should be visable in DOS w/NTFS reader,
you should be able to rule out windows entirely.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 9:56:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:

> David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
> news:10pdvooo98bg6b5@corp.supernews.com:
>
>
>
>>It wants to know which kind of flash chip your card uses. Picking the
>>wrong one can put you in even worse shape than you're already in.
>
>
> I figured as much, that's why I stopped and asked for help instead of going
> ahead.
>
>
>>>What would cause a card to lose a BIOS like this, anyway? I had
>>>intermittent periods in which the BIOS wouldn't show up at system
>>>startup, and then all of a sudden it doesn't show up at all. The HDs
>>>are still showing up as an unformatted RAID set in Windows though ...
>>>this is all very confusing to me. The card isn't detected at startup
>>>but it is detected in Windows?
>>
>>The BIOS for the card isn't loading so the 'smarts', or at least part
>>of it, for RAID is not there but the controller hardware is so Windows
>>see that.
>>
>>Btw, what size does windows say the unformatted array is? Is it the
>>right size for two drives or only one?
>
>
> It sees it as the correct size.
>
>
>>Does your card come with a windows utility that shows the drives and
>>their array assignments and what their status is? Promise does, and is
>>why I asked. On theirs you can see each drive, ot's port assignment,
>>array assignment, and whether it's active or off-line, etc.
>
>
> Yeah it does. What kind of info do you want off it? I'm not seeing port
> assignment, array assignment, or active/off-line status ... just a lot of
> stuff like "Current Mode", "Capacity", "Identify Data" (a huge random list
> of hex code). I could take screenshots of all of the info if you think
> that would help.
>
> Ohh yeah, and there's this:
>
> IRQ: 19
> Bus: 0
> Device: 11

OK. Your system is operating ACPI.

>
> From browsing the status lines it doesn't appear like anything is out of
> whack.

Yeah. Never did when my Promise screwed up either, in Windows. It's the
initial boot when the RAID card is deciding whether to load it's BIOS or
not that the problem occurs but 'Windows' thinks things are fine.


>>>Anyway, the card is pretty cheap (certainly cheaper than my 450GB of
>>>data). So I may just buy another version of the same card and see
>>>how
>>
>>>that works out.
>>
>>Frankly, I doubt the card's BIOS just suddenly vanished. BIOS not
>>loading is symptomatic of an IRQ conflict. At least that always kills
>>a Promise RAID controller. The other cause is not detecting any drives
>>as there's no reason to load RAID BIOS with no drives and it saves
>>boot time. Maybe your card doesn't load BIOS unless there are at least
>>two drives since you can't RAID with just one (Defective drive? Slow
>>spin-up?).
>
>
> Ugh, I hope the problem isn't with my drives :-/
>
>
>>See if windows says it's sharing an IRQ with something else and
>>recheck your BIOS settings. Maybe something in there changed you're
>>not aware of. Also, set PnP OS to "no." If that doesn't help, in the
>>PnP section tell it to reset data (which causes it to reassign IRQs).
>>As a last ditch check remove everything else and see if the RAID BIOS
>>loads up when it's the only thing there.
>
>
> How do I see what hardware is using which IRQ? Can that be done within
> Windows, or do I have to do it from the system BIOS?

Start, Programs, Accessories, System tools, System Information.

What you really want to see are the BIOS assignments and those should be
shown on the BIOS boot screen when it lists the known devices in the system
(hit pause to pause).

Is there anything else plugged into a PCI slot? You didn't respond to that
point.

Also, try it in a different PCI slot. As a wild guess I'd start with either
2 or 3 as 1 shares with the AGP port and 4 shares with slots over 4 (e.g.
5). The other problem is not knowing which PCI slot the on-board mobo
devices are shared off of so try them all as a last resort.


>>If not, it could be you lost a hard drive and, thinking it's the card,
>>just don't know it yet. Try the drives on a 'plain' IDE port and see
>>if they're detected. No need to boot, and don't, because the
>>partitions won't make sense and you can't read any data plus you don't
>>want Windows writing anything to them. It's just to verify they at
>>least respond to the drive type detection. Make sure you keep track of
>>which one is on which channel/port on the RAID card so you can put
>>them back in the same place: write 'drive 1' and 'drive 2' on them, or
>>whatever identifier suits your fancy.
>
>
> They're SATA drives, and I don't have any SATA connectors in my computer
> besides the ones on my RAID card.

Oh. Bummer.

Well, try it with only one, then the other, drive plugged in and see if the
BIOS comes up with just one (again, DO NOT write anything to the drives and
make no RAID configuration changes. We're just trying to see if something
will get the BIOS up to find the 'problem' device).
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 10:19:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 05:07:17 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys <cyde@umd.edu> put
finger to keyboard and composed:

>kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
>news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:
>
>> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
>> <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>>
>> If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
>> might consider buying another raid card if the
>> lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
>> it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
>> be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
>> bios is available.
>
>It is EEPROM, btw.
>
>Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
>figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
>to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>
>AMD’s Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
>AMD’s Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>Atmel’s AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
>Megabit)
>SST’s 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
>SANYO’s LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
>WinBound’s 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
>STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
>STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
>STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>
>What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
>lets me choose the BIOS image to flash.

Peel back the sticker on the flash chip, read the part number and
identify the manufacturer's logo. Post the info here if it doesn't
make sense to you.

>They don't have a very good
>flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
>to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
>*rollseyes*

Like you said, the flasher must be poor because EEPROMs are able to
report a 2-byte manufacturer and device ID when queried properly.
There should be no need for the user to tell the software what is on
the card.


- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 10:19:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"Franc Zabkar" <fzabkar@optussnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:2t4ep09so5t6l2n0ucck5af96tjisc6v6h@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 05:07:17 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys <cyde@umd.edu> put
> finger to keyboard and composed:
>
>>kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
>>news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:
>>
>>> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
>>> <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>>>
>>> If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
>>> might consider buying another raid card if the
>>> lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
>>> it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
>>> be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
>>> bios is available.
>>
>>It is EEPROM, btw.
>>
>>Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
>>figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
>>to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>>
>>AMD's Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
>>AMD's Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>Atmel's AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
>>Megabit)
>>SST's 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
>>SANYO's LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
>>WinBound's 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
>>STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
>>STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
>>STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>
>>What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
>>lets me choose the BIOS image to flash.
>
> Peel back the sticker on the flash chip, read the part number and
> identify the manufacturer's logo. Post the info here if it doesn't
> make sense to you.
>
>>They don't have a very good
>>flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
>>to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
>>*rollseyes*
>
> Like you said, the flasher must be poor because EEPROMs are able to
> report a 2-byte manufacturer and device ID when queried properly.
> There should be no need for the user to tell the software what is on
> the card.
>
>
> - Franc Zabkar

My WD SATA Raid card is actually a Promise SATA150 chip if that would be any
help. The only Western Digital thing about it is the label and box.

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 5:41:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pfvn19bng016c@corp.supernews.com:

> Cyde Weys wrote:
>> Ohh yeah, and there's this:
>>
>> IRQ: 19
>> Bus: 0
>> Device: 11
>
> OK. Your system is operating ACPI.

What is ACPI?

>> How do I see what hardware is using which IRQ? Can that be done
>> within Windows, or do I have to do it from the system BIOS?
>
> Start, Programs, Accessories, System tools, System Information.

Anyway here are the IRQs ... there are some conflicts, but none that
have to deal with the SCSI/RAID host controller.

IRQ 0 System timer OK
IRQ 1 Standard 101/102-Key or Microsoft Natural PS/2 Keyboard
OK
IRQ 4 Communications Port (COM1) OK
IRQ 6 Standard floppy disk controller OK
IRQ 8 System CMOS/real time clock OK
IRQ 9 Microsoft ACPI-Compliant System OK
IRQ 13 Numeric data processor OK
IRQ 14 Primary IDE Channel OK
IRQ 15 Secondary IDE Channel OK
IRQ 16 RADEON 9800 PRO (Microsoft Corporation) OK
IRQ 16 Creative SB Audigy 2 ZS (WDM) OK
IRQ 17 OHCI Compliant IEEE 1394 Host Controller OK
IRQ 17 WinFast TV2000 XP WDM Video Capture OK
IRQ 19 SCSI/RAID Host Controller OK
IRQ 21 VIA Rev 5 or later USB Universal Host Controller OK
IRQ 21 VIA Rev 5 or later USB Universal Host Controller OK
IRQ 21 VIA Rev 5 or later USB Universal Host Controller OK
IRQ 21 VIA USB Enhanced Host Controller OK
IRQ 23 VIA Compatable Fast Ethernet Adapter OK


> What you really want to see are the BIOS assignments and those should
> be shown on the BIOS boot screen when it lists the known devices in
> the system (hit pause to pause).

Okay, I'll get those for ya soon.

> Is there anything else plugged into a PCI slot? You didn't respond to
> that point.

Hahaha, yeah, lots of stuff ... WinFast TV tuner, Audigy 2 ZS, and the
SATA RAID controller.

> Also, try it in a different PCI slot. As a wild guess I'd start with
> either 2 or 3 as 1 shares with the AGP port and 4 shares with slots
> over 4 (e.g. 5). The other problem is not knowing which PCI slot the
> on-board mobo devices are shared off of so try them all as a last
> resort.

Okay, I'll go for that and get back to you on how it went.

>> They're SATA drives, and I don't have any SATA connectors in my
>> computer besides the ones on my RAID card.
>
> Oh. Bummer.
>
> Well, try it with only one, then the other, drive plugged in and see
> if the BIOS comes up with just one (again, DO NOT write anything to
> the drives and make no RAID configuration changes. We're just trying
> to see if something will get the BIOS up to find the 'problem'
> device).

K, I'll do that too.


--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 6:04:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pfvn19bng016c@corp.supernews.com:


> What you really want to see are the BIOS assignments and those should
> be shown on the BIOS boot screen when it lists the known devices in
> the system (hit pause to pause).

I don't know what to say ... it worked. All of my data are now intact. I
didn't even have to reboot my system after installing the driver. All I
did was hit Pause many many times as the system booted up and it paused on
the very first startup screen ... before the part where it would load the
RAID BIOS at the bottom of the screen. So then I resumed boot up, and I
guess the hard drives had plenty of time to spin up this time, because the
RAID BIOS was instantly detected and everything ran smooth as gravy from
then on out.

It looks like my drives are slow or something :-/ There's no other way to
describe it; my system just boots up too quickly for the drives to be ready
in time to be detected by the RAID BIOS. When I hold Pause at startup it
seems to work. Guess I'll have to do that from now on out.

--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 6:04:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:

> David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
> news:10pfvn19bng016c@corp.supernews.com:
>
>
>
>>What you really want to see are the BIOS assignments and those should
>>be shown on the BIOS boot screen when it lists the known devices in
>>the system (hit pause to pause).
>
>
> I don't know what to say ... it worked.

SUPER!

> All of my data are now intact. I
> didn't even have to reboot my system after installing the driver. All I
> did was hit Pause many many times as the system booted up and it paused on
> the very first startup screen ... before the part where it would load the
> RAID BIOS at the bottom of the screen. So then I resumed boot up, and I
> guess the hard drives had plenty of time to spin up this time, because the
> RAID BIOS was instantly detected and everything ran smooth as gravy from
> then on out.

Good. So we know there isn't a hard failure and your data is intact.

>
> It looks like my drives are slow or something :-/ There's no other way to
> describe it; my system just boots up too quickly for the drives to be ready
> in time to be detected by the RAID BIOS. When I hold Pause at startup it
> seems to work. Guess I'll have to do that from now on out.

Is there any setting in your RAID card for hard drive spin up delay? If
not, see if there is in the mobo BIOS itself.

I did look at your BIOS screen and I'm curious why it's assigning IRQ 3 to
the SATA card because that's the standard IRQ for serial port 2. Does your
mobo not have serial ports? Only 1? Or do you have serial port 2 disabled?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 6:13:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pfvn19bng016c@corp.supernews.com:


> What you really want to see are the BIOS assignments and those should
> be shown on the BIOS boot screen when it lists the known devices in
> the system (hit pause to pause).

For posterity's sake, here's what that screen looks like (it's a lot of
stuff to copy down so I got lazy and took a screenshot lol).

http://terpy.net/images/BIOS.jpg

--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 6:55:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pg8sdeml8pt59@corp.supernews.com:

> Cyde Weys wrote:

>> It looks like my drives are slow or something :-/ There's no other
>> way to describe it; my system just boots up too quickly for the
>> drives to be ready in time to be detected by the RAID BIOS. When I
>> hold Pause at startup it seems to work. Guess I'll have to do that
>> from now on out.
>
> Is there any setting in your RAID card for hard drive spin up delay?
> If not, see if there is in the mobo BIOS itself.

I'll have to check that ... the next time I reboot :-D

> I did look at your BIOS screen and I'm curious why it's assigning IRQ
> 3 to the SATA card because that's the standard IRQ for serial port 2.
> Does your mobo not have serial ports? Only 1? Or do you have serial
> port 2 disabled?

Serial ports are the things that look like standard monitor jacks but
aren't, right? Anyway, I only have one of those, so you could say that
serial port 2 is "permanently" disabled.

The funny thing is, I'm not even using the same driver as last time and
everything works just peachy.



--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 6:55:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:

> David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
> news:10pg8sdeml8pt59@corp.supernews.com:
>
>
>>Cyde Weys wrote:
>
>
>>>It looks like my drives are slow or something :-/ There's no other
>>>way to describe it; my system just boots up too quickly for the
>>>drives to be ready in time to be detected by the RAID BIOS. When I
>>>hold Pause at startup it seems to work. Guess I'll have to do that
>>>from now on out.
>>
>>Is there any setting in your RAID card for hard drive spin up delay?
>>If not, see if there is in the mobo BIOS itself.
>
>
> I'll have to check that ... the next time I reboot :-D
>
>
>>I did look at your BIOS screen and I'm curious why it's assigning IRQ
>>3 to the SATA card because that's the standard IRQ for serial port 2.
>>Does your mobo not have serial ports? Only 1? Or do you have serial
>>port 2 disabled?
>
>
> Serial ports are the things that look like standard monitor jacks but
> aren't, right? Anyway, I only have one of those, so you could say that
> serial port 2 is "permanently" disabled.

Well, COM1 'looks like' a VGA port, sorta. Same physical size but 9 pin
instead of 15.

On most modern motherboards COM2 looks the same and is right next to COM1
under the printer port but the alternate version (most common on AT mobos)
is a connector just like the printer port but male instead of female.

But it's becoming common to have only 1 serial port so that's probably the
case with yours.

>
> The funny thing is, I'm not even using the same driver as last time and
> everything works just peachy.

Well, the driver wouldn't have anything to do with the RAID BIOS problem as
nothing knows it's even there, much less which one, before the system has
booted.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 10:07:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 11:22:23 GMT, "Ed Medlin" <edmedlin@yahoo.com> put
finger to keyboard and composed:

>
>"Franc Zabkar" <fzabkar@optussnet.com.au> wrote in message
>news:2t4ep09so5t6l2n0ucck5af96tjisc6v6h@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 05:07:17 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys <cyde@umd.edu> put
>> finger to keyboard and composed:
>>
>>>kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
>>>news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:
>>>
>>>> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
>>>> <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>>>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>>>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>>>>
>>>> If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
>>>> might consider buying another raid card if the
>>>> lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
>>>> it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
>>>> be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
>>>> bios is available.
>>>
>>>It is EEPROM, btw.
>>>
>>>Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
>>>figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
>>>to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>>>
>>>AMD's Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
>>>AMD's Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>>Atmel's AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
>>>Megabit)
>>>SST's 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
>>>SANYO's LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
>>>WinBound's 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
>>>STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
>>>STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
>>>STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>>
>>>What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
>>>lets me choose the BIOS image to flash.
>>
>> Peel back the sticker on the flash chip, read the part number and
>> identify the manufacturer's logo. Post the info here if it doesn't
>> make sense to you.
>>
>>>They don't have a very good
>>>flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
>>>to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
>>>*rollseyes*
>>
>> Like you said, the flasher must be poor because EEPROMs are able to
>> report a 2-byte manufacturer and device ID when queried properly.
>> There should be no need for the user to tell the software what is on
>> the card.
>>
>>
>> - Franc Zabkar
>
>My WD SATA Raid card is actually a Promise SATA150 chip if that would be any
>help. The only Western Digital thing about it is the label and box.
>
>Ed

That's probably the controller chip. The EEPROM is somewhere else,
probably above and to the left, if my Web searches are correct.


- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 15, 2004 3:20:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"Franc Zabkar" <fzabkar@optussnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:h7efp0dfdd8118qdor5t2dnpk0kq09rnld@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 11:22:23 GMT, "Ed Medlin" <edmedlin@yahoo.com> put
> finger to keyboard and composed:
>
>>
>>"Franc Zabkar" <fzabkar@optussnet.com.au> wrote in message
>>news:2t4ep09so5t6l2n0ucck5af96tjisc6v6h@4ax.com...
>>> On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 05:07:17 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys <cyde@umd.edu> put
>>> finger to keyboard and composed:
>>>
>>>>kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in
>>>>news:D pr9p0hpcgiprkm6bmniiu4phmg2dirf14@4ax.com:
>>>>
>>>>> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 14:49:39 +0000 (UTC), Cyde Weys
>>>>> <cyde@umd.edu> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>I don't know if there even are jumpers on my RAID card. It worked
>>>>>>before and all of a sudden it stopped working - I never messed with
>>>>>>the hardware in any kind of way.
>>>>>
>>>>> If this is really valuable data and cheap raid card, you
>>>>> might consider buying another raid card if the
>>>>> lost-bios-issue isn't resolvable, but if windows still sees
>>>>> it and it has an EEPROM instead of PROM, you will probably
>>>>> be able to flash the bios to it, providing the flasher and
>>>>> bios is available.
>>>>
>>>>It is EEPROM, btw.
>>>>
>>>>Okay, I've downloaded the flasher and BIOS. It's very confusing to
>>>>figure out how to use though. When I boot from a FreeDOS disk and try
>>>>to run the flasher, I have to choose from one of the following ...
>>>>
>>>>AMD's Am29F010B/Am29LV010B (1 Megabit) and Am29F040B (4 Megabit)
>>>>AMD's Am29LV400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>>>Atmel's AT49BV512 (64KB), AT29LV010A (1 Megabit), and AT49LV040 (4
>>>>Megabit)
>>>>SST's 39SF010 (1 Megabit), 39VF010 (1 Megabit), and 39SF020 (2 Megabit)
>>>>SANYO's LE28C1001D (1 Megabit)
>>>>WinBound's 29EE011 (1 Megabit) and 29EE512 (64KB)
>>>>STMicroelectronics M29F010B (1 Megabit)
>>>>STMicroelectronics M29W040B (4 Megabit)
>>>>STMicroelectronics M29W400B (4 Megabit) variable sectors
>>>>
>>>>What in the heck is all of this? I need to answer this prompt before it
>>>>lets me choose the BIOS image to flash.
>>>
>>> Peel back the sticker on the flash chip, read the part number and
>>> identify the manufacturer's logo. Post the info here if it doesn't
>>> make sense to you.
>>>
>>>>They don't have a very good
>>>>flasher util ... well, it may be good, but it's certainly not specific
>>>>to their card, or even their brand, or maybe even architecture
>>>>*rollseyes*
>>>
>>> Like you said, the flasher must be poor because EEPROMs are able to
>>> report a 2-byte manufacturer and device ID when queried properly.
>>> There should be no need for the user to tell the software what is on
>>> the card.
>>>
>>>
>>> - Franc Zabkar
>>
>>My WD SATA Raid card is actually a Promise SATA150 chip if that would be
>>any
>>help. The only Western Digital thing about it is the label and box.
>>
>>Ed
>
> That's probably the controller chip. The EEPROM is somewhere else,
> probably above and to the left, if my Web searches are correct.
>
>
> - Franc Zabkar

When the bios loads it also shows as a Promise (forget the number as I am
not using it right now). The script in the bios says "Western
Digital...Promise Tech and the #. I used to have two arrays in this system,
my on-board and the WD one. I am now only using the onboard with a couple of
Maxtor 7200rpm 120mb SATA drives. Glad u got it working though.

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 16, 2004 9:37:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
news:10pg8sdeml8pt59@corp.supernews.com:

> Is there any setting in your RAID card for hard drive spin up delay?
> If not, see if there is in the mobo BIOS itself.

My RAID BIOS has no options whatsoever in it and the mobo BIOS doesn't have
a spin up delay option in it. Hrmmm :-/ Ohhh well, I can deal with
pressing Pause to boot. I reboot my computer so rarely as is.


--
~ Cyde Weys ~
Bite my shiny metal ass.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 16, 2004 10:34:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Cyde Weys wrote:

> David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in
> news:10pg8sdeml8pt59@corp.supernews.com:
>
>
>>Is there any setting in your RAID card for hard drive spin up delay?
>>If not, see if there is in the mobo BIOS itself.
>
>
> My RAID BIOS has no options whatsoever in it and the mobo BIOS doesn't have
> a spin up delay option in it. Hrmmm :-/ Ohhh well, I can deal with
> pressing Pause to boot. I reboot my computer so rarely as is.
>
>

The curse of a 'fast' computer, eh?
!