Partition HDD.

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.

I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My Documents
in another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how do you
transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more complex ?

Thanks Swoggy.
14 answers Last reply
More about partition
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Swoggy wrote:
    > Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    >
    > I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My
    > Documents in another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how do
    > you
    > transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more
    > complex ?
    > Thanks Swoggy.

    It can be helpful to put your user files (My documents) on a separate
    partition, because it makes the backing up of the important stuff a bit
    simpler. The OS and programs can be restored from the original disks
    (assuming you have original disks).

    However, make sure that you make your OS/programs partition big enough. (I
    currently make mine about 12GB - and about half of it is used).

    John.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Swoggy wrote:

    if so how do you
    > transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more
    > complex ?

    You can use copy or move to transfer data from one partition to another.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote...
    > Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    >
    > I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My Documents in
    > another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how do you transfer them,
    > Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more complex ?

    I like to keep the OS on 1 partition, Apps & Data on another, and Archives on a
    3rd. You'll find many partitioning schemes/preferences, so you'll have to
    decide what works best for you. Probably the only "universal truth" is that you
    should keep data separate from the OS. That way, if you have to format the boot
    partition to reinstall a crashed OS, you won't lose your important data.

    My XP Home boot partition is 6 GB (barely adequate these days); my XP Pro
    partition is 20 GB (plenty for OS and Temp files, as long as most Apps are
    elsewhere).
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    John R Weiss wrote:
    > "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote...
    >> Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    >>
    >> I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My
    >> Documents in another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how
    >> do you transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it
    >> more complex ?
    >
    > I like to keep the OS on 1 partition, Apps & Data on another, and
    > Archives on a 3rd. You'll find many partitioning
    > schemes/preferences, so you'll have to decide what works best for
    > you. Probably the only "universal truth" is that you should keep
    > data separate from the OS. That way, if you have to format the boot
    > partition to reinstall a crashed OS, you won't lose your important
    > data.
    > My XP Home boot partition is 6 GB (barely adequate these days); my XP
    > Pro partition is 20 GB (plenty for OS and Temp files, as long as most
    > Apps are elsewhere).

    I keep my OS and apps on C: and my data on D:. It really is best to keep
    them separate. I also have a small E: scratch partition, which is great for
    storing partial downloads from P2P. Once they are complete they get moved to
    D: and that way everything stay relatively frag free.

    But I've never understood the rationale for trying to install apps on a
    partition other than with the OS. Given that an install will typically
    update the registry and write a bunch of DLLs into the OS partition I fail
    to see what is gained by separating them, since they are inextricably
    linked. If you have to reinstall the OS then the registry is rebuilt and the
    DLLs vanish so you've got to reinstall the apps again in any case. I'm happy
    to be enlightened but at the moment this practice baffles me.

    --
    Please quote "easytiger" for your PlusNet referral :-)
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Bioboffin wrote:
    > Swoggy wrote:
    >
    > if so how do you
    >> transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more
    >> complex ?
    >
    > You can use copy or move to transfer data from one partition to
    > another.

    Also, ideally you should use Tweakui to permanently point your special
    folders (My Documents, My Music etc..) to your data drive, which then
    simplifies things in daily use. Also, if you have lots of Favorites in IE
    then I recommend storing those on your data drive too. Watch out where your
    emails and address book are stored as well. MS, in their wisdom, chose to
    bury them deep in some weird nested folder hierarchy rather than treating
    them like normal user data. So be sure to hunt them down and move them to
    your data partition before trashing that OS partition.

    Alternatively, use Files and Settings Transfer Wizard to locate that buried
    information and pop it somewhere safe like your data drive.

    --
    Please quote "easytiger" for your PlusNet referral :-)
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Tiny Tim" <_tim_dodd@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:41b7f036$0$29754$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    > John R Weiss wrote:
    > > "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote...
    > >> Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    > >>
    > >> I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My
    > >> Documents in another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how
    > >> do you transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it
    > >> more complex ?
    > >
    .........snip........
    >
    > I keep my OS and apps on C: and my data on D:. It really is best to keep
    > them separate. I also have a small E: scratch partition, which is great
    for
    > storing partial downloads from P2P. Once they are complete they get moved
    to
    > D: and that way everything stay relatively frag free.
    >
    > But I've never understood the rationale for trying to install apps on a
    > partition other than with the OS. Given that an install will typically
    > update the registry and write a bunch of DLLs into the OS partition I fail
    > to see what is gained by separating them, since they are inextricably
    > linked. If you have to reinstall the OS then the registry is rebuilt and
    the
    > DLLs vanish so you've got to reinstall the apps again in any case. I'm
    happy
    > to be enlightened but at the moment this practice baffles me.
    >
    My thoughts exactly, including being open to enlightenment.
    My partitioning (80GB Seagate Barracuda - 74.45GB formatted) :
    C: 10GB for OS + apps
    D: 10GB for work data
    E: 10GB for temporary installation or storage of anything
    F: 20GB for games
    G: 20GB for music
    H: 4.45GB for storage - raw software like OS, drivers, etc.,
    plus Ghost of C:, plus second backup of vital documents.

    Plus a separate drive for a third backup important data.

    I don't need a large storage space for my work, as would be the
    case if I regularly did something like video editing, in which case
    my partition scheme would be different or I would use another HDD.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    As HD's go, 80GB is of only moderate size in today's world. Unless you have
    the need to dual boot operating systems, you might find it easier to simply
    format the entire drive as a single partition via NTFS, assuming of course
    you are using some version of XP. HD prices are continuously falling, so it
    probably won't be long until you're ready to add another to your system for
    backups, video editing, picture files, favorite mp3's, etc. IMHO, it is much
    easier to add another HD if your existing HD is only 1 partition.

    CW

    "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:cp7the$aee$2@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    >
    > I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My Documents in
    > another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how do you transfer
    > them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more complex ?
    >
    > Thanks Swoggy.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "CW" <crazy_whizzo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1g3ud.634584$mD.66352@attbi_s02...
    > As HD's go, 80GB is of only moderate size in today's world. Unless you
    have
    > the need to dual boot operating systems, you might find it easier to
    simply
    > format the entire drive as a single partition via NTFS, assuming of course
    > you are using some version of XP. HD prices are continuously falling, so
    it
    > probably won't be long until you're ready to add another to your system
    for
    > backups, video editing, picture files, favorite mp3's, etc. IMHO, it is
    much
    > easier to add another HD if your existing HD is only 1 partition.
    >
    > CW


    I believe this is the best suggestion yet


    >
    > "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:cp7the$aee$2@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > > Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    > >
    > > I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My Documents
    in
    > > another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how do you transfer
    > > them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it more complex ?
    > >
    > > Thanks Swoggy.
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 20:32:02 -0500, "Battleax"
    <unavailable@thistime.net> wrote:

    >
    >"CW" <crazy_whizzo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:1g3ud.634584$mD.66352@attbi_s02...
    >> As HD's go, 80GB is of only moderate size in today's world. Unless you
    >have
    >> the need to dual boot operating systems, you might find it easier to
    >simply
    >> format the entire drive as a single partition via NTFS, assuming of course
    >> you are using some version of XP. HD prices are continuously falling, so
    >it
    >> probably won't be long until you're ready to add another to your system
    >for
    >> backups, video editing, picture files, favorite mp3's, etc. IMHO, it is
    >much
    >> easier to add another HD if your existing HD is only 1 partition.
    >>
    >> CW
    >
    >
    >I believe this is the best suggestion yet


    Huh?

    It's utter nonsense.
    There is no difference in ease of adding another drive when
    the first drive has only one parititon opposed to (any
    number of partitions).

    Of course the general concept of (ran out of room, need
    another drive) makes sense, but that's just par for the
    course.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:jp3ir05jgrqaigi1mimkcrlgfmaepk44qp@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 20:32:02 -0500, "Battleax"
    > <unavailable@thistime.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"CW" <crazy_whizzo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1g3ud.634584$mD.66352@attbi_s02...
    >>> As HD's go, 80GB is of only moderate size in today's world. Unless you
    >>have
    >>> the need to dual boot operating systems, you might find it easier to
    >>simply
    >>> format the entire drive as a single partition via NTFS, assuming of
    >>> course
    >>> you are using some version of XP. HD prices are continuously falling, so
    >>it
    >>> probably won't be long until you're ready to add another to your system
    >>for
    >>> backups, video editing, picture files, favorite mp3's, etc. IMHO, it is
    >>much
    >>> easier to add another HD if your existing HD is only 1 partition.
    >>>
    >>> CW
    >>
    >>
    >>I believe this is the best suggestion yet
    >
    >
    > Huh?
    >
    > It's utter nonsense.
    > There is no difference in ease of adding another drive when
    > the first drive has only one parititon opposed to (any
    > number of partitions).
    >
    > Of course the general concept of (ran out of room, need
    > another drive) makes sense, but that's just par for the
    > course.

    Glad such an expert decided to post. You explain yourself so eloquently.

    CW
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "CW" <crazy_whizzo@yahoo.com> wrote...
    > As HD's go, 80GB is of only moderate size in today's world. Unless you have
    > the need to dual boot operating systems, you might find it easier to simply
    > format the entire drive as a single partition via NTFS, assuming of course you
    > are using some version of XP. HD prices are continuously falling, so it
    > probably won't be long until you're ready to add another to your system for
    > backups, video editing, picture files, favorite mp3's, etc. IMHO, it is much
    > easier to add another HD if your existing HD is only 1 partition.

    I disagree on 2 issues:

    There are some circumstances where an OS error will require reformatting the
    boot partition to allow access to the partition. If your data is on a separate
    partition, it is more easily recoverable, especially if you don't back up the
    system regularly.

    There is no difference in ease of adding HDs, whether you're starting with 1
    or 3 or 5 logical drives. Just partition it, format it, and assign a drive
    letter in Disk Manager.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Yeah Tiny Tim I thought the same now-a-days with faster computers etc & the
    only real advantage I can find for splitting HD's is for defragging speed.
    Anything that ISN'T used to write to can be put in a seperate partition &
    only defragged every 6 months or so.
    The OS etc that gets changed VERY often can then be defragged quickly once a
    week or so on a schedule.


    "Tiny Tim" <_tim_dodd@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:41b7f036$0$29754$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    > John R Weiss wrote:
    > > "Swoggy" <swoggy1@hotmail.com> wrote...
    > >> Now I've installed the HDD - Seagate 80GB - should I partition it.
    > >>
    > >> I've read in mags having the OS on one, programs another & My
    > >> Documents in another can be of benefit. Is the correct and if so how
    > >> do you transfer them, Cut & paste from C: drive to E: etc, or is it
    > >> more complex ?
    > >
    > > I like to keep the OS on 1 partition, Apps & Data on another, and
    > > Archives on a 3rd. You'll find many partitioning
    > > schemes/preferences, so you'll have to decide what works best for
    > > you. Probably the only "universal truth" is that you should keep
    > > data separate from the OS. That way, if you have to format the boot
    > > partition to reinstall a crashed OS, you won't lose your important
    > > data.
    > > My XP Home boot partition is 6 GB (barely adequate these days); my XP
    > > Pro partition is 20 GB (plenty for OS and Temp files, as long as most
    > > Apps are elsewhere).
    >
    > I keep my OS and apps on C: and my data on D:. It really is best to keep
    > them separate. I also have a small E: scratch partition, which is great
    for
    > storing partial downloads from P2P. Once they are complete they get moved
    to
    > D: and that way everything stay relatively frag free.
    >
    > But I've never understood the rationale for trying to install apps on a
    > partition other than with the OS. Given that an install will typically
    > update the registry and write a bunch of DLLs into the OS partition I fail
    > to see what is gained by separating them, since they are inextricably
    > linked. If you have to reinstall the OS then the registry is rebuilt and
    the
    > DLLs vanish so you've got to reinstall the apps again in any case. I'm
    happy
    > to be enlightened but at the moment this practice baffles me.
    >
    > --
    > Please quote "easytiger" for your PlusNet referral :-)
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:03:57 +1030, "BruceM"
    <bruce9950@@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Yeah Tiny Tim I thought the same now-a-days with faster computers etc & the
    >only real advantage I can find for splitting HD's is for defragging speed.
    >Anything that ISN'T used to write to can be put in a seperate partition &
    >only defragged every 6 months or so.
    >The OS etc that gets changed VERY often can then be defragged quickly once a
    >week or so on a schedule.

    There are many potential reasons to split them into
    partitions.

    - Keeps files segregated so ALL of operating system, and/or
    apps stay on the faster partition(s).

    - Logical subdivisions for doing file searches, it may take
    quite a while to search 100s of GB worth of files,
    particularly if you're looking for embedded text strings or
    other parameters.

    - Backups, for several reasons but most clearly when the
    backup is a compressed image of an entire partition, and not
    everything needed backed up, or all backups weren't slated
    for removable storage so there's need for at least one other
    partition to write and store that.

    - Different cluster sizes for different file size groups

    - Different Operating System(s)
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    kony wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:03:57 +1030, "BruceM"
    > <bruce9950@@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Yeah Tiny Tim I thought the same now-a-days with faster computers etc & the
    >>only real advantage I can find for splitting HD's is for defragging speed.
    >>Anything that ISN'T used to write to can be put in a seperate partition &
    >>only defragged every 6 months or so.
    >>The OS etc that gets changed VERY often can then be defragged quickly once a
    >>week or so on a schedule.
    >
    >
    > There are many potential reasons to split them into
    > partitions.
    [snip]

    > - Backups, for several reasons but most clearly when the
    > backup is a compressed image of an entire partition, and not
    > everything needed backed up, or all backups weren't slated
    > for removable storage so there's need for at least one other
    > partition to write and store that.

    This is precisely why my Windows installation is on a seperate
    partition. Periodically I use Ghost to burn an image onto DVD. I once
    had a hard drive die with no backup. Never again. It took weeks to get
    back to the previous configuration.

    --
    Paul
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