Color shifts in Canon i550 inkjet are time-dependent

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

All the prints using the Canon inks (BCI3e series) supplied with the
printer, and Canon paper, were beautiful. When it came time to replace
the tanks, I refilled them myself. Color shifts occurred, mainly a
pronounced green cast. I also started using Kodak Soft Gloss paper. So I
couldn't tell if it was the paper or the refill inks. After dozens of
prints playing with various profiles, I still couldn't get consistent
results.

One day, starting with new Canon CYM inks (generic black), I got
excellent results printing on 4x6" Epson Glossy paper. I then started
replacing ink tanks one at a time with my refilled tanks to see if one
in particular was causing the problem. First, replaced the yellow tank;
good colors. Second, went back to the Canon yellow and used the refilled
magenta; good colors. Third, went back to the Canon magenta and used the
refilled cyan. A bizarre thing happened: the left edge of the print (the
end that gets printed first) had good colors, but by the time the right
edge came out, the green cast had returned.

I went back to all Canon inks and the green cast remained. I then
noticed that if I waited a few minutes, the green cast lessened. If I
waited overnight, the first prints the next day had excellent colors;
the green cast was gone.

So the problem seems to be that after an unknown period of use,
something restricts the flow of magenta ink, but after a "rest" period,
normal flow returns. I can't say for sure if the problem was caused by
the refills or something else.

When I returned the printer to a warranty center, of course they didn't
see the problem because the printer had been "resting" for two days.
Maybe they'll have a solution now that I have a better handle on the
problem.

I welcome your comments. (BTW, I had done head-cleaning, including deep,
several times.)
5 answers Last reply
More about color shifts canon i550 inkjet time dependent
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    <snip>
    > magenta; good colors. Third, went back to the Canon magenta and used the
    > refilled cyan. A bizarre thing happened: the left edge of the print (the
    > end that gets printed first) had good colors, but by the time the right
    > edge came out, the green cast had returned.
    >
    > I went back to all Canon inks and the green cast remained. I then
    > noticed that if I waited a few minutes, the green cast lessened. If I
    > waited overnight, the first prints the next day had excellent colors;
    > the green cast was gone.
    >
    > So the problem seems to be that after an unknown period of use,
    > something restricts the flow of magenta ink, but after a "rest" period,
    > normal flow returns. I can't say for sure if the problem was caused by
    > the refills or something else.

    Uhm... You do know that the printhead has a bunch of ink in it when you
    change cartridges and it takes some time to use up the stuff from the
    previous cartridge.

    You swapped cartridged and then after a bit you got the miscolouring. You
    put the original back and it took some time to get the correct colour back.
    There's nothing wrong with your printer. It's your replacement ink that is
    bad.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Noozer wrote:
    > <snip>
    >
    >>magenta; good colors. Third, went back to the Canon magenta and used the
    >>refilled cyan. A bizarre thing happened: the left edge of the print (the
    >>end that gets printed first) had good colors, but by the time the right
    >>edge came out, the green cast had returned.
    >>
    >>I went back to all Canon inks and the green cast remained. I then
    >>noticed that if I waited a few minutes, the green cast lessened. If I
    >>waited overnight, the first prints the next day had excellent colors;
    >>the green cast was gone.
    >>
    >>So the problem seems to be that after an unknown period of use,
    >>something restricts the flow of magenta ink, but after a "rest" period,
    >>normal flow returns. I can't say for sure if the problem was caused by
    >>the refills or something else.
    >
    >
    > Uhm... You do know that the printhead has a bunch of ink in it when you
    > change cartridges and it takes some time to use up the stuff from the
    > previous cartridge.
    >
    > You swapped cartridged and then after a bit you got the miscolouring. You
    > put the original back and it took some time to get the correct colour back.
    > There's nothing wrong with your printer. It's your replacement ink that is
    > bad.

    Yes, you are exactly right. I found that out after my original post. It
    takes around four prints to exhaust ink from the previous tank and start
    printing with ink from the new one. It was the magenta tank that caused
    the problem. A lot of crud from an unknown source is in the tank. The
    2-oz bottle from which I filled the tank looks perfectly clear and free
    on any kind of debris.

    Thanks,

    Ray
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > > You swapped cartridged and then after a bit you got the miscolouring.
    You
    > > put the original back and it took some time to get the correct colour
    back.
    > > There's nothing wrong with your printer. It's your replacement ink that
    is
    > > bad.
    >
    > Yes, you are exactly right. I found that out after my original post. It
    > takes around four prints to exhaust ink from the previous tank and start
    > printing with ink from the new one. It was the magenta tank that caused
    > the problem. A lot of crud from an unknown source is in the tank. The
    > 2-oz bottle from which I filled the tank looks perfectly clear and free
    > on any kind of debris.

    Some inks are incompatible with each other and will cause clotting. (Similar
    to what you see when you put lemon juice in milk). It's possible that the
    ink in the cartridge is not compatible with the refill ink. Not sure how you
    can test unless you can get some ink from the original cartridge.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Noozer wrote:
    >>>You swapped cartridged and then after a bit you got the miscolouring.
    >
    > You
    >
    >>>put the original back and it took some time to get the correct colour
    >
    > back.
    >
    >>>There's nothing wrong with your printer. It's your replacement ink that
    >
    > is
    >
    >>>bad.
    >>
    >>Yes, you are exactly right. I found that out after my original post. It
    >>takes around four prints to exhaust ink from the previous tank and start
    >>printing with ink from the new one. It was the magenta tank that caused
    >>the problem. A lot of crud from an unknown source is in the tank. The
    >>2-oz bottle from which I filled the tank looks perfectly clear and free
    >>on any kind of debris.
    >
    >
    > Some inks are incompatible with each other and will cause clotting. (Similar
    > to what you see when you put lemon juice in milk). It's possible that the
    > ink in the cartridge is not compatible with the refill ink. Not sure how you
    > can test unless you can get some ink from the original cartridge.
    >

    Thanks for bringing that possibility to my attention. I could take a new
    Canon tank, drill a small hole at the top of reservoir (to allow air in
    so ink can come out; I would have to do this anyway before refilling it)
    and collect a small amount of ink at the output. Then, mix a drop or two
    of the refill brand and see what happens.

    Ray
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Ray K" <raykosXXX@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:AX%Vc.10059$Nk4.4963229@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    >
    >
    > Noozer wrote:
    > >>>You swapped cartridged and then after a bit you got the miscolouring.
    > >
    > > You
    > >
    > >>>put the original back and it took some time to get the correct colour
    > >
    > > back.
    > >
    > >>>There's nothing wrong with your printer. It's your replacement ink that
    > >
    > > is
    > >
    > >>>bad.
    > >>
    > >>Yes, you are exactly right. I found that out after my original post. It
    > >>takes around four prints to exhaust ink from the previous tank and start
    > >>printing with ink from the new one. It was the magenta tank that caused
    > >>the problem. A lot of crud from an unknown source is in the tank. The
    > >>2-oz bottle from which I filled the tank looks perfectly clear and free
    > >>on any kind of debris.
    > >
    > >
    > > Some inks are incompatible with each other and will cause clotting.
    (Similar
    > > to what you see when you put lemon juice in milk). It's possible that
    the
    > > ink in the cartridge is not compatible with the refill ink. Not sure how
    you
    > > can test unless you can get some ink from the original cartridge.
    > >
    >
    > Thanks for bringing that possibility to my attention. I could take a new
    > Canon tank, drill a small hole at the top of reservoir (to allow air in
    > so ink can come out; I would have to do this anyway before refilling it)
    > and collect a small amount of ink at the output. Then, mix a drop or two
    > of the refill brand and see what happens.
    >

    There is already a small purge hole in the top of the tank to allow air to
    enter as the ink comes out. If there was not, the process would not work as
    a vacuum would form in the tank. Perhaps you should just tap the exit whole
    (larger) on a piece of glass or something to expel a few drops should you
    wish to try this weird science experiment.
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