asus k8 and AMD?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Hi

I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
once!!

I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there
are so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I
think 'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in
getting 3000 instead of 2800?

I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb
RAM so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about
onboard audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.

Any advice much appreciated!
Thanks
Dave
10 answers Last reply
More about asus
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 17:10:17 +0000, Dave <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:

    >Hi
    >
    >I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
    >However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
    >logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
    >once!!
    >
    >I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
    >www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there
    >are so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I
    >think 'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in
    >getting 3000 instead of 2800?
    >
    >I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb
    >RAM so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about
    >onboard audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.
    >
    >Any advice much appreciated!
    >Thanks
    >Dave

    Memory - Corsair XMS 512 MB @ £76.00 inc VAT
    MB - Asus K8T800 @ £74.96 inc VAT
    or ABIT KV8 Pro @ £62.99 inc VAT
    CPU - AMD Athlon 64 3200+ @ £129.00 inc VAT

    OR - forget 754 and go with 939. 939 uses dual channel memory and will be
    updatable down the road.

    Memory - 2 Corsair XMS 256mb @ £36.99 each inc VAT
    MB - Good: ABIT AV8 @ £79.99 inc VAT
    Better: MSI K8N Neo2 Platinum
    CPU - AMD Athlon 64 3000+ @ £104.00 inc VAT

    hth

    Dud
    --

    Don't bother getting married - just find a woman you hate and buy her a house.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave" <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:ct3a5d$frr$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
    > Hi
    >
    > I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
    > However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
    > logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
    > once!!
    >
    > I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
    > www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there are
    > so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I think
    > 'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in getting 3000
    > instead of 2800?
    >
    > I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb RAM
    > so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about onboard
    > audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.
    >
    > Any advice much appreciated!
    > Thanks
    > Dave

    K8N looks like the board for you. The others include RAID controllers and
    NIC's ( network interface circuits) and some over clocking features. Things
    that are interesting if you are interested, but are expensive.

    JPS
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Dave:
    > I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there
    > are so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE...

    What's the worst thing that could happen, you end up with a computer
    that's only 9X faster than your 400, instead of 10X faster. ;)
    Here are some good options:

    http://arstechnica.com/guides/buyer/system-guide-200411.ars

    --
    Mac Cool
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Mac Cool wrote:
    > Dave:
    >
    >>I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there
    >>are so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE...
    >
    >
    > What's the worst thing that could happen, you end up with a computer
    > that's only 9X faster than your 400, instead of 10X faster. ;)
    > Here are some good options:
    >
    > http://arstechnica.com/guides/buyer/system-guide-200411.ars
    >

    ah! someone thinking on my level here. This is my point exactly. It's
    such a massive performance upgrade anyway that I might as well get
    something cheap, given the pace that things are changing these days anyway.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    jpsga wrote:
    > "Dave" <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:ct3a5d$frr$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
    >>However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
    >>logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
    >>once!!
    >>
    >>I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
    >>www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there are
    >>so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I think
    >>'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in getting 3000
    >>instead of 2800?
    >>
    >>I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb RAM
    >>so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about onboard
    >>audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.
    >>
    >>Any advice much appreciated!
    >>Thanks
    >>Dave
    >
    >
    > K8N looks like the board for you. The others include RAID controllers and
    > NIC's ( network interface circuits) and some over clocking features. Things
    > that are interesting if you are interested, but are expensive.
    >
    > JPS
    >
    >

    Thanks.. still feel I'm missing out on something though :-)
    What is SATA all about, by the way? At present I have a pretty decent
    40Gb 7200rpm Maxtor harddrive which is doing just fine. I think it's
    just EIDE though (it's about 3 years old). Is IDE = ATA? Presumably with
    all these new motherboards I can just still use this HDD?

    Dave
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    jpsga wrote:
    > "Dave" <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:ct3a5d$frr$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
    >>However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
    >>logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
    >>once!!
    >>
    >>I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
    >>www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there are
    >>so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I think
    >>'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in getting 3000
    >>instead of 2800?
    >>
    >>I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb RAM
    >>so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about onboard
    >>audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.
    >>
    >>Any advice much appreciated!
    >>Thanks
    >>Dave
    >
    >
    > K8N looks like the board for you. The others include RAID controllers and
    > NIC's ( network interface circuits) and some over clocking features. Things
    > that are interesting if you are interested, but are expensive.
    >
    > JPS
    >
    >

    p.s. also, any comments on the relative performance of Nvidia versus VIA
    chipsets for motherboards? I heard in the early days (about 2 years ago)
    that some of the new motherboards for newer AMD processors had
    problems.. what is hypertransport, by the way?

    aaargh.. back in the late 90s I though I was well on top of all this
    stuff! in the last few years I seem to have slipped behind a bit in the
    knowledge :-)

    D
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave" <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:ct586f$vhm$2@news.freedom2surf.net...
    > jpsga wrote:
    >> "Dave" <davehowey@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:ct3a5d$frr$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
    >>
    >>>Hi
    >>>
    >>>I have been (amazingly) surviving with a celeron 400 mhz for years now.
    >>>However, the time has come for an upgrade. I use my PC to do music (with
    >>>logic audio) and I'm fed up with only coping with one or two effects at
    >>>once!!
    >>>
    >>>I'm looking at the AMD 64 and Asus Socket 754 motherboards on
    >>>www.overclockers.co.uk but I'm still a bit baffled for choice.. there are
    >>>so many options, do I go for K8N, E, S, VSE... and for processor, I think
    >>>'newcastle' is my core of choice, but is there much point in getting 3000
    >>>instead of 2800?
    >>>
    >>>I'm looking to spend about £200-£250 for m'board, processor and 512mb RAM
    >>>so any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not bothered about onboard
    >>>audio, but most motherboards seem to come with it nowadays anyway.
    >>>
    >>>Any advice much appreciated!
    >>>Thanks
    >>>Dave
    >>
    >>
    >> K8N looks like the board for you. The others include RAID controllers and
    >> NIC's ( network interface circuits) and some over clocking features.
    >> Things that are interesting if you are interested, but are expensive.
    >>
    >> JPS
    >
    > p.s. also, any comments on the relative performance of Nvidia versus VIA
    > chipsets for motherboards? I heard in the early days (about 2 years ago)
    > that some of the new motherboards for newer AMD processors had problems..
    > what is hypertransport, by the way?
    >
    > aaargh.. back in the late 90s I though I was well on top of all this
    > stuff! in the last few years I seem to have slipped behind a bit in the
    > knowledge :-)
    >
    > D

    Lets face it Dave, your not a speed freak. Using a 400mhz celeron in 2005
    would have put most of us in Bedlam!!

    I was even surprised that you were looking at 64 CPU. They are expensive and
    bring very little increase in through-put. All software you and I run was
    compiled into 32bit code. The 64bit software includes a 32bit emulator so it
    will run our programs.

    Hypertransport is the bus and the speed with which the north bridge
    communicates with the CPU. The 64 bit CPUs communicate directly with memory
    as opposed to 32 bit system were the north bridge did that job supplied the
    CPU with memory data on demand from the CPU. So currently available chip
    sets are about equal in performance and are judged by what other function
    they support. Usually in the area of high speed 3D graphics,

    A SATA drive has the ability to supply data from /to the drive in a
    serially. This allows a smaller cable and gets around the problems
    associated with the old EIDE and the LBA scheme. Speed wise, a SATA drive
    and a PATA drive are about the same.
    A substantial increase in sustained read/write speeds come when you build
    a RAID 0 array with two SATA drives. This is a feature worth spending a few
    pounds sterling on as it does enhance through-put.

    As to your current drive, it will do fine on the standard EIDE controller.
    Yes the standard EIDE interface is an AT Attachment (aka ATA). But it is 3
    years old. Just one of the good reasons to Maxtor.

    As you tell from my very biased and opinionated comments I have little
    respect for 64 CPUs, there day is coming but it is not here. If you like
    the 64 idea move to the 939pin AMD unit. Better memory control with dual
    channel and allows less expensive memory.

    I have had great success with RAID 0. Using music files (.WAV and .WMA)
    as well as photographic work with .TIF and JPG.

    Jim
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 14:37:15 -0500, "jpsga"
    <jpsga@comcast.net> wrote:


    >
    >Lets face it Dave, your not a speed freak. Using a 400mhz celeron in 2005
    >would have put most of us in Bedlam!!
    >
    >I was even surprised that you were looking at 64 CPU. They are expensive and
    >bring very little increase in through-put. All software you and I run was
    >compiled into 32bit code. The 64bit software includes a 32bit emulator so it
    >will run our programs.

    Untrue. Athlon 64 is currently the fastest desktop/PC CPU
    for 32 bit. That is supports 64 bit is icing on the cake.

    >
    >Hypertransport is the bus and the speed with which the north bridge
    >communicates with the CPU. The 64 bit CPUs communicate directly with memory
    >as opposed to 32 bit system were the north bridge did that job supplied the
    >CPU with memory data on demand from the CPU. So currently available chip
    >sets are about equal in performance and are judged by what other function
    >they support. Usually in the area of high speed 3D graphics,

    .... or southbridge (or lack thereof) features.

    >
    >A SATA drive has the ability to supply data from /to the drive in a
    >serially. This allows a smaller cable and gets around the problems
    >associated with the old EIDE and the LBA scheme.

    No, SATA is not a way to "get around problems" you
    mentioned. Cable size is nice but not a problem. LBA is
    not moreso a problem on PATA133 than SATA.

    >Speed wise, a SATA drive
    >and a PATA drive are about the same.
    >A substantial increase in sustained read/write speeds come when you build
    >a RAID 0 array with two SATA drives. This is a feature worth spending a few
    >pounds sterling on as it does enhance through-put.


    >
    >As to your current drive, it will do fine on the standard EIDE controller.
    >Yes the standard EIDE interface is an AT Attachment (aka ATA). But it is 3
    >years old. Just one of the good reasons to Maxtor.
    >
    >As you tell from my very biased and opinionated comments I have little
    >respect for 64 CPUs, there day is coming but it is not here. If you like
    >the 64 idea move to the 939pin AMD unit. Better memory control with dual
    >channel and allows less expensive memory.
    >
    > I have had great success with RAID 0. Using music files (.WAV and .WMA)
    >as well as photographic work with .TIF and JPG.

    Good grief, music and pics don't even need a drive made in
    the last 5 years. Most PC users will benefit more from a
    single, large high RPM drive than a RAID0. Most PC users
    can't even recover a RAID0 should something go wrong, nor do
    they realize that if the motherboard goes tits-up, they're
    forced to buy into same SATA implementation. Very bad idea
    if data (Or time) is valuable.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:hthdv0l7bne63fs1c8at7mn7k239lu3f2g@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 14:37:15 -0500, "jpsga"
    > <jpsga@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Lets face it Dave, your not a speed freak. Using a 400mhz celeron in 2005
    >>would have put most of us in Bedlam!!
    >>
    >>I was even surprised that you were looking at 64 CPU. They are expensive
    >>and
    >>bring very little increase in through-put. All software you and I run was
    >>compiled into 32bit code. The 64bit software includes a 32bit emulator so
    >>it
    >>will run our programs.
    >
    > Untrue. Athlon 64 is currently the fastest desktop/PC CPU
    > for 32 bit. That is supports 64 bit is icing on the cake.
    >
    >>
    >>Hypertransport is the bus and the speed with which the north bridge
    >>communicates with the CPU. The 64 bit CPUs communicate directly with
    >>memory
    >>as opposed to 32 bit system were the north bridge did that job supplied
    >>the
    >>CPU with memory data on demand from the CPU. So currently available chip
    >>sets are about equal in performance and are judged by what other function
    >>they support. Usually in the area of high speed 3D graphics,
    >
    > ... or southbridge (or lack thereof) features.
    >
    >>
    >>A SATA drive has the ability to supply data from /to the drive in a
    >>serially. This allows a smaller cable and gets around the problems
    >>associated with the old EIDE and the LBA scheme.
    >
    > No, SATA is not a way to "get around problems" you
    > mentioned. Cable size is nice but not a problem. LBA is
    > not moreso a problem on PATA133 than SATA.
    >
    >>Speed wise, a SATA drive
    >>and a PATA drive are about the same.
    >>A substantial increase in sustained read/write speeds come when you
    >>build
    >>a RAID 0 array with two SATA drives. This is a feature worth spending a
    >>few
    >>pounds sterling on as it does enhance through-put.
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >>As to your current drive, it will do fine on the standard EIDE controller.
    >>Yes the standard EIDE interface is an AT Attachment (aka ATA). But it is 3
    >>years old. Just one of the good reasons to Maxtor.
    >>
    >>As you tell from my very biased and opinionated comments I have little
    >>respect for 64 CPUs, there day is coming but it is not here. If you like
    >>the 64 idea move to the 939pin AMD unit. Better memory control with dual
    >>channel and allows less expensive memory.
    >>
    >> I have had great success with RAID 0. Using music files (.WAV and .WMA)
    >>as well as photographic work with .TIF and JPG.
    >
    > Good grief, music and pics don't even need a drive made in
    > the last 5 years. Most PC users will benefit more from a
    > single, large high RPM drive than a RAID0. Most PC users
    > can't even recover a RAID0 should something go wrong, nor do
    > they realize that if the motherboard goes tits-up, they're
    > forced to buy into same SATA implementation. Very bad idea
    > if data (Or time) is valuable.

    No so .. This is standard babble from people who don't use RAID 0.
    The RAPTORS makes this machine fast and crisp. Average file size is 5mB and
    a min. of 24 files per fetch. One second or so they are ready to process.
    Never had a failure in any of the 5 arrays that are in service here.
    JPS
    JPS
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 18:20:41 -0500, "jpsga"
    <jpsga@comcast.net> wrote:


    >>> I have had great success with RAID 0. Using music files (.WAV and .WMA)
    >>>as well as photographic work with .TIF and JPG.
    >>
    >> Good grief, music and pics don't even need a drive made in
    >> the last 5 years. Most PC users will benefit more from a
    >> single, large high RPM drive than a RAID0. Most PC users
    >> can't even recover a RAID0 should something go wrong, nor do
    >> they realize that if the motherboard goes tits-up, they're
    >> forced to buy into same SATA implementation. Very bad idea
    >> if data (Or time) is valuable.
    >
    >No so .. This is standard babble from people who don't use RAID 0.

    .... and from those who do, or have, or could, or simply
    realize that 100MB worth of 5MB files is a mere drop in the
    bucket compared to video.


    >The RAPTORS makes this machine fast and crisp. Average file size is 5mB and
    >a min. of 24 files per fetch. One second or so they are ready to process.
    > Never had a failure in any of the 5 arrays that are in service here.

    Sure, fast and crisp, but it's hardly a strain on a single
    modern drive to handle ~ 100MB worth of 5MB files.
    You may find it a little faster, but that particular use
    alone is hardly a justification for RAID0.
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