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Sleep mode vs turn off laser printer - Brother HL-1440

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August 21, 2004 3:19:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I recently purchased a Brother HL-1440. My first laser printer. I
have always powered off all of my inkjet printers each night or when I
did not expect to use them for several hours. My thinking was that
the power down parked the print head/cartridges and kept them from
drying out.

According to the HL-1440 user guide the printer only uses 6 watts of
power during sleep mode and there is nothing to dry out. So should I
just leave it on or power off each night? Any harm to the printer
either way? Certainly for extended periods, days/weeks, I'd turn it
off and possible unplug it if I plan to be gone for an extended time.

--
BrZ
Anonymous
August 21, 2004 4:00:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <2op7g5Fd7e83U1@uni-berlin.de>,
Plan9 <benzplan9@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I recently purchased a Brother HL-1440. My first laser printer. I
> have always powered off all of my inkjet printers each night or when I
> did not expect to use them for several hours. My thinking was that
> the power down parked the print head/cartridges and kept them from
> drying out.

You mean you never actually read the owner's manuals for the inkjet
printrs in question? You just decided that you must know better based
on your hunches, therefore why bother with reading the manufacturer's
specifications.

There's a lot of "my thinking was..." going on in the world, and that's
how old wives' tales come about. Then you get to have kids, and you
pass your "wisdom" on to your kids, then they turn out dumb as stumps as
well.



> According to the HL-1440 user guide the printer only uses 6 watts of
> power during sleep mode and there is nothing to dry out.

That's correct.



> So should I
> just leave it on or power off each night? Any harm to the printer
> either way?

What does the manual say?

You have a TV and a VCR, right? Do you power those off? By power off,
I mean do you actually cut ALL power from going to those devices when
you're not using them?

No, you don't. When you hit the power button, they go to sleep. Their
internal circuitry is still alive and consuming power; they're keeping
time, channel memories, etc, and they're listening for a remote control
or internal timer code to tell them to turn on the rest of the
circuitry, fire up the tube, start the tape rolling, etc.

Look at your TV and VCR manuals, and see how much power they consume
when "off".

So you don't actually turn OFF your TV and VCR when you're not using
them, right? You don't go and hit a power strip switch or anything, or
some master power button (sometimes called a "vacation" button) on the
TV, right?

The laser printer is no different. When sleeping it's powered all the
way down except for the same bare minimum current required to keep the
circuitry alive that looks for a print job coming in. When a print job
comes in, the rest of the machine powers up and prints the job. Then it
goes back to sleep again after a few minutes.

Modern HP printers don't even have an on/off switch. The most they ever
power down is to sleep mode--just like the most your VCR ever powers
down is sleep mode. Some current is ALWAYS going through the thing.

For extended absences, unplug the thing. Otherwise, leave it plugged in
and let its internal circuitry decide when to turn the fuser and motors
on and when to leave them off.

An actual power switch isn't needed nowadays, and is overkill.
Anonymous
August 21, 2004 7:27:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The HL-1440 is a LASER printer not inkjet


"Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote in message
news:elmop-2A0493.12005521082004@text.usenetserver.com...
> In article <2op7g5Fd7e83U1@uni-berlin.de>,
> Plan9 <benzplan9@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I recently purchased a Brother HL-1440. My first laser printer. I
> > have always powered off all of my inkjet printers each night or when I
> > did not expect to use them for several hours. My thinking was that
> > the power down parked the print head/cartridges and kept them from
> > drying out.
>
> You mean you never actually read the owner's manuals for the inkjet
> printrs in question? You just decided that you must know better based
> on your hunches, therefore why bother with reading the manufacturer's
> specifications.
>
> There's a lot of "my thinking was..." going on in the world, and that's
> how old wives' tales come about. Then you get to have kids, and you
> pass your "wisdom" on to your kids, then they turn out dumb as stumps as
> well.
>
>
>
> > According to the HL-1440 user guide the printer only uses 6 watts of
> > power during sleep mode and there is nothing to dry out.
>
> That's correct.
>
>
>
> > So should I
> > just leave it on or power off each night? Any harm to the printer
> > either way?
>
> What does the manual say?
>
> You have a TV and a VCR, right? Do you power those off? By power off,
> I mean do you actually cut ALL power from going to those devices when
> you're not using them?
>
> No, you don't. When you hit the power button, they go to sleep. Their
> internal circuitry is still alive and consuming power; they're keeping
> time, channel memories, etc, and they're listening for a remote control
> or internal timer code to tell them to turn on the rest of the
> circuitry, fire up the tube, start the tape rolling, etc.
>
> Look at your TV and VCR manuals, and see how much power they consume
> when "off".
>
> So you don't actually turn OFF your TV and VCR when you're not using
> them, right? You don't go and hit a power strip switch or anything, or
> some master power button (sometimes called a "vacation" button) on the
> TV, right?
>
> The laser printer is no different. When sleeping it's powered all the
> way down except for the same bare minimum current required to keep the
> circuitry alive that looks for a print job coming in. When a print job
> comes in, the rest of the machine powers up and prints the job. Then it
> goes back to sleep again after a few minutes.
>
> Modern HP printers don't even have an on/off switch. The most they ever
> power down is to sleep mode--just like the most your VCR ever powers
> down is sleep mode. Some current is ALWAYS going through the thing.
>
> For extended absences, unplug the thing. Otherwise, leave it plugged in
> and let its internal circuitry decide when to turn the fuser and motors
> on and when to leave them off.
>
> An actual power switch isn't needed nowadays, and is overkill.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 21, 2004 7:58:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Plan9" <benzplan9@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:2op7g5Fd7e83U1@uni-berlin.de...
> I recently purchased a Brother HL-1440. My first laser printer. I
> have always powered off all of my inkjet printers each night or when I
> did not expect to use them for several hours. My thinking was that
> the power down parked the print head/cartridges and kept them from
> drying out.
>
> According to the HL-1440 user guide the printer only uses 6 watts of
> power during sleep mode and there is nothing to dry out. So should I
> just leave it on or power off each night? Any harm to the printer
> either way? Certainly for extended periods, days/weeks, I'd turn it
> off and possible unplug it if I plan to be gone for an extended time.
>
> --
> BrZ

Don't know about the 1440 but I have a trusty 10 year old HL-660. Does your
1440 have a power button, the 660 does not.

If there's no power button leave it on as you would either have to unplug it
or have it connected to a power strip. I know that cutting the power to my
660 would cause some unfavorable results (i.e., toner on back of several
pages) the next time I printed anything. This may not be the case with your
1440, but just the same, if the manual recommends so, leave it on.

David
Anonymous
August 22, 2004 1:43:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Russ Blakeman" <rhb57@rbcsweb.net> wrote in comp.periphs.printers:
>DO NOT put a laser printer on a UPS battery backup)

Why not?

[Please don't quote upside down, and please do trim quotes; see
<http://web.presby.edu/~nnqadmin/nnq/nquote.html&gt;.]

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
"You want an intelligent conversation? Do what I do: talk to
yourself. It's the only way." -- /Torch Song Trilogy/
Anonymous
August 22, 2004 6:14:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <MPG.1b926d10694d812f98c8a8@news.odyssey.net>, Stan Brown wrote:
> "Russ Blakeman" <rhb57@rbcsweb.net> wrote in comp.periphs.printers:
>>DO NOT put a laser printer on a UPS battery backup)
>
> Why not?

Because it has high power drainage when printing, and if generally
considered bad (like the coffee machine). The output ports
of most UPS do not protect one device from sending spikes to
the others.

If you want it on UPS, give it its own.

--
Povl H. Pedersen - NoSpam@my.terminal.dk (yes - it works)
Fastnet - IP telefoni: 5 kr/md Se http://www.misumi.dk
Anonymous
August 22, 2004 7:36:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Povl H. Pedersen" <povlhp@povl-h-pedersens-computer.local> wrote in
comp.periphs.printers:
>In article <MPG.1b926d10694d812f98c8a8@news.odyssey.net>, Stan Brown wrote:
>> "Russ Blakeman" <rhb57@rbcsweb.net> wrote in comp.periphs.printers:
>>>DO NOT put a laser printer on a UPS battery backup)
>>
>> Why not?
>
>Because it has high power drainage when printing, and if generally
>considered bad (like the coffee machine). The output ports
>of most UPS do not protect one device from sending spikes to
>the others.

Gotcha; thanks.

My UPS has two groups of ports -- one group that simply conditions
output power, and one group that conditions power and provides power
when there's none coming from the wall. I have my printer in the
first group and all teh rest in the second group. There's been no
sign of the printer's power surge affecting any other device -- no
screen flicker, for instance.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
"You want an intelligent conversation? Do what I do: talk to
yourself. It's the only way." -- /Torch Song Trilogy/
Anonymous
August 23, 2004 4:34:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Actually he has it wrong. If a UPS connects to a wall
receptacle, then the "conditioned" outlets have the same
protection as the other outlet on that wall receptacle.
Protectors do not sit between the noise and the appliance.
They are called shunt mode protector for very good reason.
The protector connects to AC mains as if it was another light
bulb. The AC mains connects directly to every appliance and
to the protector circuit equally.

There is a dirty little secret about typical plug-in UPSes
they would rather not discuss. For 120 VAC, the UPS output is
often very dirty electricity when in battery backup mode. For
example, this UPS outputs two 200 volt square waves with a 270
spike between those square waves when lightly loaded in
battery backup mode. That 270 volt spike and 200 volt square
waves is totally irrelevant to electronics which are some of
the most resilient appliances in the house. But that same 200
volt square wave - also using deceptive expressions such as
modified sine wave - can be destructive to small electric
motors.

That is correct. The appliance often sees some of the
dirtiest electricity when UPS is in battery backup mode. No
problem because electronic power supplies are so resilient.
But UPSes in battery backup mode can output high harmonics
which is not good for small electric motors. So they simply
avoid the entire topic and recommend you not put printers no a
UPS output.

For the exact same reason, those UPS manufacturers also
recommend you not put a power strip protector on a UPS output.
Either the power strip protector is degraded or the UPS is
damaged.

Again there is no magic protection blocking the appliance
from AC mains spikes. When not in battery backup mode, the
appliance is connected directly to AC mains. There is no
magic filter between AC mains and appliance - except inside
the appliance. That is correct. Any protection that works
adjacent to the electronic appliance is already inside that
appliance. Even think that UPS conditions power. Any
conditioning is so trivial as to be irrelevant. That UPS
serves one purpose - to protect data from power loss. In
which case there is no advantage to connecting a printer to
the UPS.

Stan Brown wrote:
> Gotcha; thanks.
>
> My UPS has two groups of ports -- one group that simply conditions
> output power, and one group that conditions power and provides power
> when there's none coming from the wall. I have my printer in the
> first group and all teh rest in the second group. There's been no
> sign of the printer's power surge affecting any other device -- no
> screen flicker, for instance.
July 8, 2009 12:09:12 PM

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <2op7g5Fd7e83U1@uni-berlin.de>,
Plan9 <benzplan9@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I recently purchased a Brother HL-1440. My first laser printer. I
> have always powered off all of my inkjet printers each night or when I
> did not expect to use them for several hours. My thinking was that
> the power down parked the print head/cartridges and kept them from
> drying out.

You mean you never actually read the owner's manuals for the inkjet
printrs in question? You just decided that you must know better based
on your hunches, therefore why bother with reading the manufacturer's
specifications.

There's a lot of "my thinking was..." going on in the world, and that's
how old wives' tales come about. Then you get to have kids, and you
pass your "wisdom" on to your kids, then they turn out dumb as stumps as
well.



> According to the HL-1440 user guide the printer only uses 6 watts of
> power during sleep mode and there is nothing to dry out.

That's correct.



> So should I
> just leave it on or power off each night? Any harm to the printer
> either way?

What does the manual say?

You have a TV and a VCR, right? Do you power those off? By power off,
I mean do you actually cut ALL power from going to those devices when
you're not using them?

No, you don't. When you hit the power button, they go to sleep. Their
internal circuitry is still alive and consuming power; they're keeping
time, channel memories, etc, and they're listening for a remote control
or internal timer code to tell them to turn on the rest of the
circuitry, fire up the tube, start the tape rolling, etc.

Look at your TV and VCR manuals, and see how much power they consume
when "off".

So you don't actually turn OFF your TV and VCR when you're not using
them, right? You don't go and hit a power strip switch or anything, or
some master power button (sometimes called a "vacation" button) on the
TV, right?

The laser printer is no different. When sleeping it's powered all the
way down except for the same bare minimum current required to keep the
circuitry alive that looks for a print job coming in. When a print job
comes in, the rest of the machine powers up and prints the job. Then it
goes back to sleep again after a few minutes.

Modern HP printers don't even have an on/off switch. The most they ever
power down is to sleep mode--just like the most your VCR ever powers
down is sleep mode. Some current is ALWAYS going through the thing.

For extended absences, unplug the thing. Otherwise, leave it plugged in
and let its internal circuitry decide when to turn the fuser and motors
on and when to leave them off.

An actual power switch isn't needed nowadays, and is overkill.


Sorry - I just had to respond to this person's reply. He or she seems to think that we should simply 'obey' everything manufacturers tell us and not think for ourselves. I'm sorry, but that is precisely why the world is in such a mess.

For example, when I was given a digital electricity monitor by my energy supply company last year, I discovered that my cable tv box consumes 30 watts when it's in use, and the same (!) when it's in standby mode.

Therefore, assuming it's on standby for an average of 20 hours per day, it's consuming 600 watts a day pointlessly. That's like leaving a toaster on for a whole hour, with no toast in it! Nobody would consider wasting so much energy, would they? Even a technician who came out to mend it didn't realise it wasted so much energy. Over a year it wastes an incredible 219 kilowatts.

Because it doesn't have a 'power off' switch, I went out and bought a simple remote control unit that allows me to turn it off when I'm not watching tv and when it's not set to record. The only inconvenience is a 30-second wait for it to boot up when I turn it on in the evening - hardly the end of the world - which is exactly where we're heading if people like the above don't wake up, realise what's going on and start thinking and acting for themselves.

A laser printing consuming 'only' 6 watts is probably using up 130 watts per day pointlessly (assuming 2 hours actual usage per day). That's the equivalent of leaving 6.5 100watt-equivalent energy-saving lightbulbs on for an hour, in the middle of the day. What a waste.

Manufacturers that don't provide 'power off' switches should be held to account.
Anonymous
October 1, 2010 12:26:49 PM

Held to account by whom? The Federal government? More nanny state intervention? Vote with your wallet. If you don't like the design, buy somebody else's. That's how free markets work. Enough people shun a particular model because they want the option of turning it off, the feature set will change adjust to the market's demand.
Anonymous
November 13, 2010 5:17:30 PM

gboston said:
Sorry - I just had to respond to this person's reply. He or she seems to think that we should simply 'obey' everything manufacturers tell us and not think for ourselves. I'm sorry, but that is precisely why the world is in such a mess.

For example, when I was given a digital electricity monitor by my energy supply company last year, I discovered that my cable tv box consumes 30 watts when it's in use, and the same (!) when it's in standby mode.

Therefore, assuming it's on standby for an average of 20 hours per day, it's consuming 600 watts a day pointlessly. That's like leaving a toaster on for a whole hour, with no toast in it! Nobody would consider wasting so much energy, would they? Even a technician who came out to mend it didn't realise it wasted so much energy. Over a year it wastes an incredible 219 kilowatts.

Because it doesn't have a 'power off' switch, I went out and bought a simple remote control unit that allows me to turn it off when I'm not watching tv and when it's not set to record. The only inconvenience is a 30-second wait for it to boot up when I turn it on in the evening - hardly the end of the world - which is exactly where we're heading if people like the above don't wake up, realise what's going on and start thinking and acting for themselves.

A laser printing consuming 'only' 6 watts is probably using up 130 watts per day pointlessly (assuming 2 hours actual usage per day). That's the equivalent of leaving 6.5 100watt-equivalent energy-saving lightbulbs on for an hour, in the middle of the day. What a waste.

Manufacturers that don't provide 'power off' switches should be held to account.


A little knowledge is a very dangerous thing.

Your remote control unit also constantly uses power. It has a transformer, an infra-red sensor which is constantly on, and circuits which never power down. You have spent a lot of money to prevent one device from always being on standby, only to allow another device to be on standby. A heck of a lot of energy was used to create the second device in the factory, so you're not saving the planet by any stretch. I'd be surprised if your (no doubt expensive) little standby gadget will ever even pay for itself.

Also, there is no such thing as "130 watts per day" -a Watt is the RATE at which power is being consumed. A Watt/hour is a QUANTITY of power consumed. You need to brush up on your physics before you talk any more nonsense.

30W standby is hardly anything really. Those remote control things you bought are only really useful (ie economically beneficial) for high current in standby mode devices, not satellite boxes, which are almost as basic as the remote power off device itself. Just when you're about to congratulate yourself for saving money with that gadget, you'll be buying a new set of batteries for its remote and there go the minuscule cost savings.

People also think wind farms will save the planet. Too bad they spew out thousands of tons of carbon dioxide as the thousands upon thousands of tons of concrete used to make them sets.

Another inconvenient truth for the environmental feel-good brigade.
November 15, 2010 12:39:06 PM

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