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Lost space on hard drive

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 12:27:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
"lost" area it seems.

Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
Samsung site does not have a utility for it.

More about : lost space hard drive

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 12:27:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

DRSAP wrote:
> I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
> I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
> need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
> "lost" area it seems.
>
> Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
> i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
> Samsung site does not have a utility for it.

There's nothing missing and the two numbers are the same thing; just 'said'
differently.

The 'real' number is the 160 gigabytes but there is no such thing as a
binary "giga" because "giga" is a decimal system, base 10, prefix, as is
mega, and kilo, etc. They're powers of 10 and 2 don't go into 10.

So Windows uses a cross breed, pseudo decibinal (my invention to describe
half breed decimal prefixes tacked onto binary numbers) approximation that
considers 1024 to be a 'Kilo' and 1,048,576 to be a 'Meg' and 1,073,741,824
to be a 'Gig'.

So 160 real decimal system gigabytes translates into 149 Gig as Windows
figures it in decibinal.

However, do a properties on the drive and you'll see it listed in both
decimal (the number with a bunch of digits showing the exact byte count)
and 'decibinal' (the small one to the right).
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 12:27:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

The reference to a 160 GB harddrive refers to its UNFORMATTED capacity. To
use the drive you have to Format it and that reduces the useable space to
150 GB. Nothing you can do about it.

--
DaveW



"DRSAP" <a@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:b36s211j5qf50lmi2l184d98f8th9ibmko@4ax.com...
>
> I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
> I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
> need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
> "lost" area it seems.
>
> Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
> i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
> Samsung site does not have a utility for it.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 12:55:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"DRSAP" <a@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:b36s211j5qf50lmi2l184d98f8th9ibmko@4ax.com...
>
> I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
> I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
> need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
> "lost" area it seems.
>
> Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
> i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
> Samsung site does not have a utility for it.

You have the correct size and nothig is lost. Hard drive manufacturers
list their drive capacities using 1MB = 1,000,000 bytes while
the real definition (which Windows displays) is 1,048,576 bytes.
When you convert your a 160GB drive to the real GB value
it comes out to ~149GB. You can also see that value
when you right click on your drive in My Computer
and then Properties.


---
Kevin Chalker, Owner KC COMPUTERS
E-mail: kc@kc-computers.com Web: www.kc-computers.com
Internet dealer since 1991!!! See WWW.RESELLERRATINGS.COM!!!
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 12:55:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

KC Computers wrote:

>
> "DRSAP" <a@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:b36s211j5qf50lmi2l184d98f8th9ibmko@4ax.com...
>
>>
>> I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
>> I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
>> need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
>> "lost" area it seems.
>>
>> Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
>> i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
>> Samsung site does not have a utility for it.
>
>
> You have the correct size and nothig is lost. Hard drive manufacturers
> list their drive capacities using 1MB = 1,000,000 bytes while
> the real definition (which Windows displays) is 1,048,576 bytes.

Your numbers are correct except the "real definition" is 1MB = 1,000,000.

Kilo, Mega, and Giga are *decimal system* prefixes and using them on binary
numbers is a closest fit hack, albeit a common hack.

> When you convert your a 160GB drive to the real GB value
> it comes out to ~149GB. You can also see that value
> when you right click on your drive in My Computer
> and then Properties.
>
>
> ---
> Kevin Chalker, Owner KC COMPUTERS
> E-mail: kc@kc-computers.com Web: www.kc-computers.com
> Internet dealer since 1991!!! See WWW.RESELLERRATINGS.COM!!!
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 1:58:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

yep my seagate 160gn shows as 149gb

time they sorted this as the drives get bigger the gap gets ridiculous!


"KC Computers" <kc@REMOVEkc-computers.com> wrote in message
news:o bpXd.116785$nC5.61045@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>
> "DRSAP" <a@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:b36s211j5qf50lmi2l184d98f8th9ibmko@4ax.com...
> >
> > I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
> > I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please? Reason I
> > need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
> > "lost" area it seems.
> >
> > Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
> > i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
> > Samsung site does not have a utility for it.
>
> You have the correct size and nothig is lost. Hard drive manufacturers
> list their drive capacities using 1MB = 1,000,000 bytes while
> the real definition (which Windows displays) is 1,048,576 bytes.
> When you convert your a 160GB drive to the real GB value
> it comes out to ~149GB. You can also see that value
> when you right click on your drive in My Computer
> and then Properties.
>
>
> ---
> Kevin Chalker, Owner KC COMPUTERS
> E-mail: kc@kc-computers.com Web: www.kc-computers.com
> Internet dealer since 1991!!! See WWW.RESELLERRATINGS.COM!!!
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 4:47:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

DaveW wrote:

> The reference to a 160 GB harddrive refers to its UNFORMATTED capacity. To
> use the drive you have to Format it and that reduces the useable space to
> 150 GB. Nothing you can do about it.
>

Wrong. It's the difference between using true decimal and binary pseudo
decimal prefixes.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 4:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 21:27:04 GMT, DRSAP <a@nospam.com>
wrote:

>
>I have a samsung SP1614N which should be 160Gb. In XP after formatting
>I get 150Gb. How does one reclaim this lost space please?

This is the kind of thing that Google can find.

>Reason I
>need it is because I want to use it in a PVR and it does not like the
>"lost" area it seems.

That isn't the problem. Maybe you've formatted it in a
format the PVR doesn't support. Try formatting it per the
PVR's manual, instructions.

>
>Alternatively how can I restore the drive to it's "original state"
>i.e. as it came from the manufacturer? Will a low level format do?
>Samsung site does not have a utility for it.

Have you made the Samsung diagnostic/utilities floopy(s)?
There might be an option in those... it wouldn't actually be
a low level format as that hasn't been possible in years,
but a "zero fill" would be the closest an end-user can do,
and should be unnecessary towards your goal.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 6:11:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
news:112tag1if9e7t01@corp.supernews.com...
> DaveW wrote:
>
>> The reference to a 160 GB harddrive refers to its UNFORMATTED capacity.
>> To use the drive you have to Format it and that reduces the useable space
>> to 150 GB. Nothing you can do about it.
>>
>
> Wrong. It's the difference between using true decimal and binary pseudo
> decimal prefixes.
>

I like decibinal better.........:-) Never know, Webster might go for it.
Now you need to create a decibinal system theory to go with it.

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 9, 2005 6:11:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Ed Medlin wrote:

> "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
> news:112tag1if9e7t01@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>DaveW wrote:
>>
>>
>>>The reference to a 160 GB harddrive refers to its UNFORMATTED capacity.
>>>To use the drive you have to Format it and that reduces the useable space
>>>to 150 GB. Nothing you can do about it.
>>>
>>
>>Wrong. It's the difference between using true decimal and binary pseudo
>>decimal prefixes.
>>
>
>
> I like decibinal better.........:-) Never know, Webster might go for it.
> Now you need to create a decibinal system theory to go with it.
>
> Ed

Hehe. Thanks.

It does sort of capture the angst of it.


On a more serious note, there actually is a movement growing in the
international standards community to define new prefixes for 'decibinal'
that, to avoid unnecessary confusion, would be similar to the decimal ones
but different, to avoid unnecessary confusion, which will probably lead to
a whole new round of unnecessary confusion. But at least it would be a well
defined and technically precise confusion ;) 
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 10, 2005 2:23:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Try this:

http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html



--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> kirjoitti viestissä
news:112uaa9540dl42@corp.supernews.com...
> Ed Medlin wrote:
>
> > "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
> > news:112tag1if9e7t01@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> >>DaveW wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>The reference to a 160 GB harddrive refers to its UNFORMATTED capacity.
> >>>To use the drive you have to Format it and that reduces the useable
space
> >>>to 150 GB. Nothing you can do about it.
> >>>
> >>
> >>Wrong. It's the difference between using true decimal and binary pseudo
> >>decimal prefixes.
> >>
> >
> >
> > I like decibinal better.........:-) Never know, Webster might go for
it.
> > Now you need to create a decibinal system theory to go with it.
> >
> > Ed
>
> Hehe. Thanks.
>
> It does sort of capture the angst of it.
>
>
> On a more serious note, there actually is a movement growing in the
> international standards community to define new prefixes for 'decibinal'
> that, to avoid unnecessary confusion, would be similar to the decimal ones
> but different, to avoid unnecessary confusion, which will probably lead to
> a whole new round of unnecessary confusion. But at least it would be a
well
> defined and technically precise confusion ;) 
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 10, 2005 2:23:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Thomas Wendell wrote:

> Try this:
>
> http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>
>
>

Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't clear
to me that it's been universally adopted.

If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see they've
got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte' means even
though they're using the officially correct default definition needing no
explanation. Western Digital puts it in their product specifications
datasheet. Like:
http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...

"Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a gigabyte
(GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."

A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like that's
the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only permitted "if
such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case basis."

Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the discrepancy is
due to "formatting."

Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)

Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 10, 2005 4:41:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
news:1130cj7esngm6c1@corp.supernews.com...
> Thomas Wendell wrote:
>
>> Try this:
>>
>> http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>>
>>
>>
>
> Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't clear
> to me that it's been universally adopted.
>
> If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see they've
> got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte' means even
> though they're using the officially correct default definition needing no
> explanation. Western Digital puts it in their product specifications
> datasheet. Like:
> http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...
>
> "Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a gigabyte
> (GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."
>
> A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like
> that's the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only
> permitted "if such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case
> basis."
>
> Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the discrepancy
> is due to "formatting."
>
> Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)
>
> Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>

I still think that a decibinal system would take care of the confusion,
even if it is well defined and technically precise "confusion". There would
have to be a differentiation between speed and storage if I read the
datasheet correctly. With decibinal, kdb* per second to make it distinct
from say a 200gdb HDD (for the above mentioned formatted HDD). IMO, the
datasheet info is much more confusing than decibinal, if kept simple, would
be...........:-)

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 10, 2005 4:41:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Ed Medlin wrote:
> "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
> news:1130cj7esngm6c1@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Thomas Wendell wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Try this:
>>>
>>>http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't clear
>>to me that it's been universally adopted.
>>
>>If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see they've
>>got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte' means even
>>though they're using the officially correct default definition needing no
>>explanation. Western Digital puts it in their product specifications
>>datasheet. Like:
>>http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...
>>
>>"Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a gigabyte
>>(GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."
>>
>>A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like
>>that's the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only
>>permitted "if such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case
>>basis."
>>
>>Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the discrepancy
>>is due to "formatting."
>>
>>Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)
>>
>>Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
>>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>
>
>
> I still think that a decibinal system would take care of the confusion,

Well, 'decibinal' is what we already got in all but name, which I just
coined so we got that too ;) 

> even if it is well defined and technically precise "confusion". There would
> have to be a differentiation between speed and storage

Where did "speed" come into this?

> if I read the
> datasheet correctly. With decibinal, kdb* per second to make it distinct
> from say a 200gdb HDD (for the above mentioned formatted HDD).

Speed is already distinct from capacity. I don't understand what you're
getting at.

> IMO, the
> datasheet info is much more confusing than decibinal, if kept simple, would
> be...........:-)
>
> Ed
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 11, 2005 2:04:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
news:1130tg78asvkh23@corp.supernews.com...
> Ed Medlin wrote:
>> "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
>> news:1130cj7esngm6c1@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>Thomas Wendell wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Try this:
>>>>
>>>>http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't clear
>>>to me that it's been universally adopted.
>>>
>>>If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see they've
>>>got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte' means even
>>>though they're using the officially correct default definition needing no
>>>explanation. Western Digital puts it in their product specifications
>>>datasheet. Like:
>>>http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...
>>>
>>>"Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a
>>>gigabyte (GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."
>>>
>>>A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like
>>>that's the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only
>>>permitted "if such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case
>>>basis."
>>>
>>>Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the discrepancy
>>>is due to "formatting."
>>>
>>>Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)
>>>
>>>Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
>>>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>>
>>
>>
>> I still think that a decibinal system would take care of the
>> confusion,
>
> Well, 'decibinal' is what we already got in all but name, which I just
> coined so we got that too ;) 
>
>> even if it is well defined and technically precise "confusion". There
>> would have to be a differentiation between speed and storage
>
> Where did "speed" come into this?

It was mentioned in the datasheet above as one of the new standards
considered along with storage values. Guess I got off on a tangent......:-)
Not the first time.......

>
>> if I read the datasheet correctly. With decibinal, kdb* per second to
>> make it distinct from say a 200gdb HDD (for the above mentioned formatted
>> HDD).
>
> Speed is already distinct from capacity. I don't understand what you're
> getting at.

Yes, I know. Terminalogy is all I was speaking of. Speed should be dealt
with as a different issue really. Is a kbps REALLY a kbps? I guess what I
was getting to is that a kb, when it pertains to storage, is not the same as
a kb when it comes to speaking of data transfer speed. How in the hell did I
get to here anyway......... ?? .............:-) Too early, not enough
coffee.....I dunno.

Ed

>
>> IMO, the datasheet info is much more confusing than decibinal, if kept
>> simple, would be...........:-)
>>
>> Ed
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 11, 2005 2:04:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Ed Medlin wrote:

> "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
> news:1130tg78asvkh23@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Ed Medlin wrote:
>>
>>>"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
>>>news:1130cj7esngm6c1@corp.supernews.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Thomas Wendell wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Try this:
>>>>>
>>>>>http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't clear
>>>>to me that it's been universally adopted.
>>>>
>>>>If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see they've
>>>>got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte' means even
>>>>though they're using the officially correct default definition needing no
>>>>explanation. Western Digital puts it in their product specifications
>>>>datasheet. Like:
>>>>http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...
>>>>
>>>>"Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a
>>>>gigabyte (GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."
>>>>
>>>>A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like
>>>>that's the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only
>>>>permitted "if such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case
>>>>basis."
>>>>
>>>>Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the discrepancy
>>>>is due to "formatting."
>>>>
>>>>Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)
>>>>
>>>>Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
>>>>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I still think that a decibinal system would take care of the
>>>confusion,
>>
>>Well, 'decibinal' is what we already got in all but name, which I just
>>coined so we got that too ;) 
>>
>>
>>>even if it is well defined and technically precise "confusion". There
>>>would have to be a differentiation between speed and storage
>>
>>Where did "speed" come into this?
>
>
> It was mentioned in the datasheet above as one of the new standards
> considered along with storage values. Guess I got off on a tangent......:-)
> Not the first time.......
>
>
>>>if I read the datasheet correctly. With decibinal, kdb* per second to
>>>make it distinct from say a 200gdb HDD (for the above mentioned formatted
>>>HDD).
>>
>>Speed is already distinct from capacity. I don't understand what you're
>>getting at.
>
>
> Yes, I know. Terminalogy is all I was speaking of. Speed should be dealt
> with as a different issue really. Is a kbps REALLY a kbps? I guess what I
> was getting to is that a kb, when it pertains to storage, is not the same as
> a kb when it comes to speaking of data transfer speed. How in the hell did I
> get to here anyway......... ?? .............:-) Too early, not enough
> coffee.....I dunno.

Oh, I see. Well, mbps not always being mbps was a new one to me when I
first read that article. Sounds like decibinal software types dabbling in
telecom because I find it hard to believe any hardware engineers did it.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 12, 2005 2:48:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
news:1133071fb94ql2c@corp.supernews.com...
> Ed Medlin wrote:
>
>> "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
>> news:1130tg78asvkh23@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>Ed Medlin wrote:
>>>
>>>>"David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
>>>>news:1130cj7esngm6c1@corp.supernews.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Thomas Wendell wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Try this:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Right. I've seen it but while IEC adopted the terminology it wasn't
>>>>>clear to me that it's been universally adopted.
>>>>>
>>>>>If you look at hard drive manufacturer sites, though, you'll see
>>>>>they've got, somewhere, the IEEE 'disclosure' about what 'megabyte'
>>>>>means even though they're using the officially correct default
>>>>>definition needing no explanation. Western Digital puts it in their
>>>>>product specifications datasheet. Like:
>>>>>http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std...
>>>>>
>>>>>"Western Digital defines a megabyte (MB) as 1,000,000 bytes and a
>>>>>gigabyte (GB) as 1,000,000,000 bytes."
>>>>>
>>>>>A bit arrogant of them to claim they 'define' it though ;)  More like
>>>>>that's the one they "use." And rightly so since the others are only
>>>>>permitted "if such usage is explicitly pointed out on a case-by-case
>>>>>basis."
>>>>>
>>>>>Btw, the datasheet also answers the erroneous claim that the
>>>>>discrepancy is due to "formatting."
>>>>>
>>>>>Specifications for the 200GB Caviar Serial ATA drive (model WD2000BD)
>>>>>
>>>>>Formatted Capacity 200,049 MB
>>>>>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I still think that a decibinal system would take care of the
>>>> confusion,
>>>
>>>Well, 'decibinal' is what we already got in all but name, which I just
>>>coined so we got that too ;) 
>>>
>>>
>>>>even if it is well defined and technically precise "confusion". There
>>>>would have to be a differentiation between speed and storage
>>>
>>>Where did "speed" come into this?
>>
>>
>> It was mentioned in the datasheet above as one of the new standards
>> considered along with storage values. Guess I got off on a
>> tangent......:-) Not the first time.......
>>
>>
>>>>if I read the datasheet correctly. With decibinal, kdb* per second to
>>>>make it distinct from say a 200gdb HDD (for the above mentioned
>>>>formatted HDD).
>>>
>>>Speed is already distinct from capacity. I don't understand what you're
>>>getting at.
>>
>>
>> Yes, I know. Terminalogy is all I was speaking of. Speed should be dealt
>> with as a different issue really. Is a kbps REALLY a kbps? I guess what I
>> was getting to is that a kb, when it pertains to storage, is not the same
>> as a kb when it comes to speaking of data transfer speed. How in the hell
>> did I get to here anyway......... ?? .............:-) Too early, not
>> enough coffee.....I dunno.
>
> Oh, I see. Well, mbps not always being mbps was a new one to me when I
> first read that article. Sounds like decibinal software types dabbling in
> telecom because I find it hard to believe any hardware engineers did it.

Those were my thoughts too. Back to more coffee.......

Ed
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