Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

No power to my new mainboard

Last response: in Systems
Share
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2005 2:16:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2 Series) with and AMD
Athlon 64 processor, have everything in place, including a new 400 W
power supply, with the exception of the front panel power switch. I
see where it’s supposed to go but it doesn’t seem to fit, and I’ve
tried it, and it doesn’t work. So, what am I to do? The computer
shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously a Pentium II.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246156

More about : power mainboard

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2005 7:57:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 17 Mar 2005 23:16:29 -0500, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:

>I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2 Series) with and AMD
>Athlon 64 processor, have everything in place, including a new 400 W
>power supply, with the exception of the front panel power switch. I
>see where it’s supposed to go but it doesn’t seem to fit, and I’ve
>tried it, and it doesn’t work. So, what am I to do? The computer
>shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously a Pentium II.

How did you try it, exactly?

Check the manual to confirm you have the correct two
power-on pins on the motherboard pin-header. Try to start
the system by shorting those two together for a moment with
a (something metal, electrically conductive) screwdriver
tip. System should start. No point trying to swap wires
around till you know you have the right pins.

Considering it's a Dell system, could be a proprietary
connecter(s). Isolate the two wires leading to the switch
and swap the position in the connector if possible. If
connector has tiny lock-tabs on the side you might very
gently, barely pry up on the tab (with a needle or similar)
while pulling on the wires and they'll release and slip out.
Be careful not to break the tab as it's easy to do,
especially on old/brittle plastic.

If it's an insulation displacement type connector (tabs on
the ends and a ribbon cable(s)) then you might have to come
up with an alternate strategy, like making an adapter or
perhaps easiest would be to get a bi-pin connector socket
with two wires already attached... pull it out of an old
computer system as it might be used for LEDs or reset, etc,
switches, or if you have a local mom-n-pop computer shop
nearby they might have something, maybe just a salvage part
out of an old AT case they'd throw away.

Once you had the connector + wires you could either solder
that to the Dell switch (or front circuit board, depending
on how it's set up) or if you found a reset switch out of an
old system that is same as what Dell used, you might be able
to just replace whole switch. It's a bit hard to determine
the best/easiest/cheapest/etc solution without knowing
exactly what you're dealing with.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2005 10:12:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Take a tip off of something else and splice the wires.


"ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message
news:7_246156_6bd2cd9b30b335dbdf565152e0506d6f@hardwareforumz.com...
>I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2 Series) with and AMD
> Athlon 64 processor, have everything in place, including a new 400 W
> power supply, with the exception of the front panel power switch. I
> see where it's supposed to go but it doesn't seem to fit, and I've
> tried it, and it doesn't work. So, what am I to do? The computer
> shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously a Pentium II.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 18, 2005 2:54:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Baad Boy" wrote:
> Take a tip off of something else and splice the wires.
>
>
> "ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message
> news:7_246156_6bd2cd9b30b335dbdf565152e0506d6f@hardwareforumz.com...
> >I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2 Series) with and
> AMD
> > Athlon 64 processor, have everything in place, including a
> new 400 W
> > power supply, with the exception of the front panel power
> switch. I
> > see where it's supposed to go but it doesn't seem to fit,
> and I've
> > tried it, and it doesn't work. So, what am I to do? The
> computer
> > shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously a Pentium II.

I was able to short the switch and it started up fine...well, it
started up...I don’t know how fine...I have no video to tell. This
probably deserves another post, but I’ll go ahead and ask here.

Now the system starts, but won’t boot. All the fans start, the discs
seem to start, but I have no video output, including now green light
on the monitor. I have a new video card in the system, and ATI 9200
256 if I’m remembering correctly, and I have the disc to install the
drivers, but I don’t think that should matter until graphics mode
comes into play. Anyway, I can’t install the drivers without seeing
the monitor.

I’m nearly positive I installed the CPU in the correct orientation, as
it slipped in perfectly with no resistance, and the arrows were
oriented as shown. The power supply is new and everything seems to be
functioning that is connected. The fan cooling the CPU is new and
seems to be working properly, although it is difficult to judge
appropriate speed. Fans on the power supply seem to be working
appropriately. There is an additional fan adjacent to the CPU which I
disconnected, and it didn’t seem to make a difference.

I’m not sure where I should be looking for things shorting out or
incorrect polarity, etc. Also, I have access to a voltmeter, but not
sure where to check voltages and exactly what potentials I am looking
for.

Any help would be appreciated. I’ve never done this before.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246269
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2005 2:09:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Pretty obvious like you said.............
Either reseat the video card if need be & if that doesn't work, try another
one. Did you buy it new or on Ebay or somewhere?


"ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message
news:7_246269_1883aee2d8421464fafc02a2c7527cb7@hardwareforumz.com...
> "Baad Boy" wrote:
> > Take a tip off of something else and splice the wires.
> >
> >
> > "ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message
> > news:7_246156_6bd2cd9b30b335dbdf565152e0506d6f@hardwareforumz.com...
> > >I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2 Series) with and
> > AMD
> > > Athlon 64 processor, have everything in place, including a
> > new 400 W
> > > power supply, with the exception of the front panel power
> > switch. I
> > > see where it's supposed to go but it doesn't seem to fit,
> > and I've
> > > tried it, and it doesn't work. So, what am I to do? The
> > computer
> > > shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously a Pentium II.
>
> I was able to short the switch and it started up fine...well, it
> started up...I don't know how fine...I have no video to tell. This
> probably deserves another post, but I'll go ahead and ask here.
>
> Now the system starts, but won't boot. All the fans start, the discs
> seem to start, but I have no video output, including now green light
> on the monitor. I have a new video card in the system, and ATI 9200
> 256 if I'm remembering correctly, and I have the disc to install the
> drivers, but I don't think that should matter until graphics mode
> comes into play. Anyway, I can't install the drivers without seeing
> the monitor.
>
> I'm nearly positive I installed the CPU in the correct orientation, as
> it slipped in perfectly with no resistance, and the arrows were
> oriented as shown. The power supply is new and everything seems to be
> functioning that is connected. The fan cooling the CPU is new and
> seems to be working properly, although it is difficult to judge
> appropriate speed. Fans on the power supply seem to be working
> appropriately. There is an additional fan adjacent to the CPU which I
> disconnected, and it didn't seem to make a difference.
>
> I'm not sure where I should be looking for things shorting out or
> incorrect polarity, etc. Also, I have access to a voltmeter, but not
> sure where to check voltages and exactly what potentials I am looking
> for.
>
> Any help would be appreciated. I've never done this before.
>
> --
> Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's
request
> Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
> Topic URL:
http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
> Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse:
http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246269
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2005 2:09:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"BruceM" wrote:
> Pretty obvious like you said.............
> Either reseat the video card if need be & if that doesn't
> work, try another
> one. Did you buy it new or on Ebay or somewhere?
>
>
> "ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote in message
> news:7_246269_1883aee2d8421464fafc02a2c7527cb7@hardwareforumz.com...
> > "Baad Boy" wrote:
>  > > Take a tip off of something else and splice the
> wires.
>  > >
>  > >
>  > > "ctlphd" <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com>
> wrote in message
>  > >
> news:7_246156_6bd2cd9b30b335dbdf565152e0506d6f@hardwareforumz.com...
>   > > >I just put in a new mainboard (MSI K8T Neo2
> Series) with and
>  > > AMD
>   > > > Athlon 64 processor, have everything in
> place, including a
>  > > new 400 W
>   > > > power supply, with the exception of the
> front panel power
>  > > switch. I
>   > > > see where it's supposed to go but it
> doesn't seem to fit,
>  > > and I've
>   > > > tried it, and it doesn't work. So, what am
> I to do? The
>  > > computer
>   > > > shell is an old Dell Dimension, previously
> a Pentium II.
> >
> > I was able to short the switch and it started up
> fine...well, it
> > started up...I don't know how fine...I have no video to
> tell. This
> > probably deserves another post, but I'll go ahead and ask
> here.
> >
> > Now the system starts, but won't boot. All the fans start,
> the discs
> > seem to start, but I have no video output, including now
> green light
> > on the monitor. I have a new video card in the system, and
> ATI 9200
> > 256 if I'm remembering correctly, and I have the disc to
> install the
> > drivers, but I don't think that should matter until graphics
> mode
> > comes into play. Anyway, I can't install the drivers without
> seeing
> > the monitor.
> >
> > I'm nearly positive I installed the CPU in the correct
> orientation, as
> > it slipped in perfectly with no resistance, and the arrows
> were
> > oriented as shown. The power supply is new and everything
> seems to be
> > functioning that is connected. The fan cooling the CPU is
> new and
> > seems to be working properly, although it is difficult to
> judge
> > appropriate speed. Fans on the power supply seem to be
> working
> > appropriately. There is an additional fan adjacent to the
> CPU which I
> > disconnected, and it didn't seem to make a difference.
> >
> > I'm not sure where I should be looking for things shorting
> out or
> > incorrect polarity, etc. Also, I have access to a voltmeter,
> but not
> > sure where to check voltages and exactly what potentials I
> am looking
> > for.
> >
> > Any help would be appreciated. I've never done this before.
> >
> > --
> > Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's
> request
> > Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet
> standards
> > Topic URL:
> http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
> > Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report
> abuse:
> http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246269

>Either reseat the video card if need be & if that doesn’t work, try
another
>one.

I reseated the card and got the same result. Furthermore, I checked
the voltage output and couldn’t detect any in the CRT or Video Out,
but I could detect just over a volt in several leads in the DVI,
leading me to believe the video card IS the problem, as you suggested.

Did you buy it new or on Ebay or somewhere?

I thought I was purchasing the card new from an online computer store,
but it came packaged as though it were refurbished. I will be more
careful about that next time.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2005 2:09:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 18 Mar 2005 23:03:47 -0500, ctlphd
<DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:

>"BruceM" wrote:
> > Pretty obvious like you said.............
> > Either reseat the video card if need be & if that doesn't
> > work, try another
> > one. Did you buy it new or on Ebay or somewhere?
> >

>>Either reseat the video card if need be & if that doesn’t work, try
>another
>>one.
>
>I reseated the card and got the same result. Furthermore, I checked
>the voltage output and couldn’t detect any in the CRT or Video Out,
>but I could detect just over a volt in several leads in the DVI,
>leading me to believe the video card IS the problem, as you suggested.
>
> Did you buy it new or on Ebay or somewhere?
>
>I thought I was purchasing the card new from an online computer store,
>but it came packaged as though it were refurbished. I will be more
>careful about that next time.


It is a bit premature to suspect the video card. Even so,
if you had a spare (even a really old PCI card) you might
try it instead.

Having not built a system like this before, there are a lot
of little things you might've overlooked. Frankly I
practically do it on "autopilot" and might easily forget to
mention something, so the following is't comprehensive but
just a few random thoughts as they come.

Make sure there is no extra/unused standoff on the Dell
case. Frequently one 2nd to bottom on the left hand side
was used on Dell et al Intel boards but not on newer full
height ATX boards.

Try clearing CMOS. Check all jumpers. Disconnect all
non-essential parts, leaving only 1 memory module, video
card, heatsink+fan (and CPU of course). Drives and
keyboard/mouse/etc are not needed at this point.

Short the two pins to turn it on as you've done already, but
in worst case scenario you'd remove board from case, put it
on a non-conductive surface, _not_ an anti-static bag, along
with power supply and aforementioned parts, trying it
outside of case.

Take voltage readings of the power supply output, through
the back of the ATX connector while the system is in the
"on" but not POSTing situation you describe. That's
essentially what's happening to your system, it won't POST.
Although the obvious result is no video on the monitor,
that's sorta-coincidental most of the time. While it
"could" be a video card problem, more often it isn't.

Check battery voltage. Examine around motherboard for any
signs of physical damage, including around heatsink mounting
area. Double-check that memory is fully inserted, that
cards line up well, that the motherboard isn't slightly
off-center on the mounting studs. Occasionally OEMs use
unique mounting studs too so the final suggestion to remove
board from case (then clear CMOS) and retry it, would
eliminate this possiblity.

Generally when the video is a problem you will get beep
codes. Perhaps not always but it's to be expected.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 1:25:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>It is a bit premature to suspect the video card. Even so,
>if you had a spare (even a really old PCI card) you might
>try it instead.

Unfortunately, my old card doesn’t fit in the slot.

>Make sure there is no extra/unused standoff on the Dell
>case. Frequently one 2nd to bottom on the left hand side
>was used on Dell et al Intel boards but not on newer full
>height ATX boards.

There are actually 2 missing standoffs, as there was an adapter piece
on the Dell board that will that lifts the mainboard too high in the
new board and witll therefore not fit. It is therefore
"free-floating" at 2 points.

>Try clearing CMOS.


Do I just do this by removing the small round battery?

>Check all jumpers.

How do I do this?

>Disconnect all non-essential parts, leaving only 1 memory module,
>video card, heatsink+fan (and CPU of course). Drives and
>keyboard/mouse/etc are not needed at this point.

I have done most of this.

>Short the two pins to turn it on as you’ve done already, but
>in worst case scenario you’d remove board from case, put it
>on a non-conductive surface, _not_ an anti-static bag, along
>with power supply and aforementioned parts, trying it
>outside of case.

I’m going to try a few more things before doing this.

>Take voltage readings of the power supply output, through
>the back of the ATX connector while the system is in the
>"on" but not POSTing situation you describe. That’s
>essentially what’s happening to your system, it won’t
>POST.
>Although the obvious result is no video on the monitor,
>that’s sorta-coincidental most of the time. While it
>"could" be a video card problem, more often it isn’t.

That’s what I thought, but what about the lack of voltage in the video
outputs?

>Check battery voltage. Examine around motherboard for any
>signs of physical damage, including around heatsink mounting
>area. Double-check that memory is fully inserted, that
>cards line up well, that the motherboard isn’t slightly
>off-center on the mounting studs. Occasionally OEMs use
>unique mounting studs too so the final suggestion to remove
>board from case (then clear CMOS) and retry it, would
>eliminate this possiblity.

see above

>Generally when the video is a problem you will get beep
>codes. Perhaps not always but it’s to be expected.

It looks from the board like the sound is dependent on the same switch
as the on-off switch, and I have not been getting any beeps on startup
whatsoever, so I don’t think that is a reliable indicator in this
case.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246654
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 1:25:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"ctlphd" wrote:
>
Quote:
It is a bit premature to suspect the video
> card. Even so,
> if you had a spare (even a really old PCI card) you might
> try it instead.

>
> Unfortunately, my old card doesn't fit in the slot.
>
>
Quote:
Make sure there is no extra/unused standoff
> on the Dell
> case. Frequently one 2nd to bottom on the left hand side
> was used on Dell et al Intel boards but not on newer full
> height ATX boards.

>
> There are actually 2 missing standoffs, as there was an
> adapter piece on the Dell board that will that lifts the
> mainboard too high in the new board and witll therefore not
> fit. It is therefore "free-floating" at 2 points.
>
>
Quote:
Try clearing CMOS.

>
> Do I just do this by removing the small round battery?
>
>
Quote:
Check all jumpers.

>
> How do I do this?
>
>
Quote:
Disconnect all non-essential parts, leaving
> only 1 memory module, video card, heatsink+fan (and CPU of
> course). Drives and keyboard/mouse/etc are not needed at this
> point.

>
> I have done most of this.
>
>
Quote:
Short the two pins to turn it on as you've
> done already, but
> in worst case scenario you'd remove board from case, put it
> on a non-conductive surface, _not_ an anti-static bag, along
> with power supply and aforementioned parts, trying it
> outside of case.

>
> I'm going to try a few more things before doing this.
>
>
Quote:
Take voltage readings of the power supply
> output, through
> the back of the ATX connector while the system is in the
> "on" but not POSTing situation you describe. That's
> essentially what's happening to your system, it won't POST.
> Although the obvious result is no video on the monitor,
> that's sorta-coincidental most of the time. While it
> "could" be a video card problem, more often it
> isn't.

>
> That's what I thought, but what about the lack of voltage in
> the video outputs?
>
>
Quote:
Check battery voltage. Examine around
> motherboard for any
> signs of physical damage, including around heatsink mounting
> area. Double-check that memory is fully inserted, that
> cards line up well, that the motherboard isn't slightly
> off-center on the mounting studs. Occasionally OEMs use
> unique mounting studs too so the final suggestion to remove
> board from case (then clear CMOS) and retry it, would
> eliminate this possiblity.

>
> see above
>
>
Quote:
Generally when the video is a problem you
> will get beep
> codes. Perhaps not always but it's to be
> expected.

>
> It looks from the board like the sound is dependent on the
> same switch as the on-off switch, and I have not been getting
> any beeps on startup whatsoever, so I don't think that is a
> reliable indicator in this case.

Could this be it??? The system fan on my old computer didn’t have a
sensor wire and the new board requires one. I realized this upon
taking everything out of the box as you suggested (and it still didn’t
work, and neither did the fan). So, I’ll order or go buy another fan
(with 3 wires instead of 2) and see how that works.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 2:39:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"ctlphd" wrote:
> Could this be it??? The system fan on my old computer didn't
> have a sensor wire and the new board requires one. I realized
> this upon taking everything out of the box as you suggested
> (and it still didn't work, and neither did the fan). So, I'll
> order or go buy another fan (with 3 wires instead of 2) and
> see how that works.

I came across the fix of the problem upon trying multiple things.
Clearing the CMOS setting makes everything work, but unfortunately I
don’t know how to set it correctly permanently, so I have to clear it
every time! Can anybody help with setting the CMOS?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 6:38:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 19 Mar 2005 22:25:08 -0500, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:


>>Try clearing CMOS.
>
>
>Do I just do this by removing the small round battery?

Yes, while AC is disconnected from PSU. Your manual should
have info on these things, but you could disconnect AC and
use clear CMOS jumper instead (again, see the manual).

>
>>Check all jumpers.
>
>How do I do this?

Is this a trick question?
Check the manual, confirm all settings are either at their
defaults, or changed appropriate to your parts and needs.



>
>That’s what I thought, but what about the lack of voltage in the video
>outputs?

Did you measure for DC AND AC?
Forget about that for a moment, if there is no picture going
to the monitor because the system isn't POSTing, then of
course it won't be outputting anything. That is what is
supposed to happen, not evidence of a problem.


>
>>Check battery voltage. Examine around motherboard for any
>>signs of physical damage, including around heatsink mounting
>>area. Double-check that memory is fully inserted, that
>>cards line up well, that the motherboard isn’t slightly
>>off-center on the mounting studs. Occasionally OEMs use
>>unique mounting studs too so the final suggestion to remove
>>board from case (then clear CMOS) and retry it, would
>>eliminate this possiblity.
>
>see above

See what? Try the rest.


>
>>Generally when the video is a problem you will get beep
>>codes. Perhaps not always but it’s to be expected.
>
>It looks from the board like the sound is dependent on the same switch
>as the on-off switch, and I have not been getting any beeps on startup
>whatsoever, so I don’t think that is a reliable indicator in this
>case.

Sound is not "dependant" on anything. Sure, you have to
turn the system on, but otherwise all that is necessary is
either:

A) Buzzer integrated on the board, typically small black
plastic, round with pinhole in top.

B) More traditional looking ~ 2" speaker mounted somewhere
in case, typically near front wall of case.

C) Integrated sound and amplified speakers plugged into the
jack in the back... and a jumper moved to enable this. This
C) option does not prevent A) or B) from working, you do not
need to fool with speakers at this point.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 6:38:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"kony" wrote:
> On 19 Mar 2005 22:25:08 -0500, ctlphd
> <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:
>
>
>  >>Try clearing CMOS.
> >
> >
> >Do I just do this by removing the small round battery?
>
> Yes, while AC is disconnected from PSU. Your manual should
> have info on these things, but you could disconnect AC and
> use clear CMOS jumper instead (again, see the manual).
>
> >
>  >>Check all jumpers.
> >
> >How do I do this?
>
> Is this a trick question?
> Check the manual, confirm all settings are either at their
> defaults, or changed appropriate to your parts and needs.
>
>
>
> >
> >That’s what I thought, but what about the lack of voltage in
> the video
> >outputs?
>
> Did you measure for DC AND AC?
> Forget about that for a moment, if there is no picture going
> to the monitor because the system isn't POSTing, then of
> course it won't be outputting anything. That is what is
> supposed to happen, not evidence of a problem.
>
>
> >
>  >>Check battery voltage. Examine around motherboard for
> any
>  >>signs of physical damage, including around heatsink
> mounting
>  >>area. Double-check that memory is fully inserted, that
>  >>cards line up well, that the motherboard isn’t
> slightly
>  >>off-center on the mounting studs. Occasionally OEMs
> use
>  >>unique mounting studs too so the final suggestion to
> remove
>  >>board from case (then clear CMOS) and retry it, would
>  >>eliminate this possiblity.
> >
> >see above
>
> See what? Try the rest.
>
>
> >
>  >>Generally when the video is a problem you will get
> beep
>  >>codes. Perhaps not always but it’s to be expected.
> >
> >It looks from the board like the sound is dependent on the
> same switch
> >as the on-off switch, and I have not been getting any beeps
> on startup
> >whatsoever, so I don’t think that is a reliable indicator in
> this
> >case.
>
> Sound is not "dependant" on anything. Sure, you have to
> turn the system on, but otherwise all that is necessary is
> either:
>
> A) Buzzer integrated on the board, typically small black
> plastic, round with pinhole in top.
>
> B) More traditional looking ~ 2" speaker mounted somewhere
> in case, typically near front wall of case.
>
> C) Integrated sound and amplified speakers plugged into the
> jack in the back... and a jumper moved to enable this. This
> C) option does not prevent A) or B) from working, you do not
> need to fool with speakers at this point.

As I said, I did strip it down to the bare essentials, main board,
power supply, video board, monitor, and it still didn’t work, until I
cleared the CMOS, and then it did. But now I don’t know how to set
the CMOS, because every time it goes back to an unusable
configuration.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=246915
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 6:47:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 19 Mar 2005 22:25:26 -0500, ctlphd
<DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:


> > It looks from the board like the sound is dependent on the
> > same switch as the on-off switch, and I have not been getting
> > any beeps on startup whatsoever, so I don't think that is a
> > reliable indicator in this case.
>
>Could this be it??? The system fan on my old computer didn’t have a
>sensor wire and the new board requires one. I realized this upon
>taking everything out of the box as you suggested (and it still didn’t
>work, and neither did the fan). So, I’ll order or go buy another fan
>(with 3 wires instead of 2) and see how that works.


This what?
No, generally the fan RPM wire will not keep a board from
posting. The board "might" turn itself off AFTER it had
posted when it senses no fan RPM, but typically the board
will show a text indicator or audible alarm and the feature
can be disabled in the bios. Even if feature can't be
disabled, this is not likely to be your problem.

Your failure-to-post problem is probably not some obscure
thing. The focus on sound and fans and video voltages would
not begin to address the most common causes. Did you ever
take power supply voltage readings, assess the adequacy of
the PSU? If we make suggestions and you don't mention if
you tried (each), we have no way of knowing if it's even
worthwhile to make any more suggestions, as it would be
pointless to make more suggestions without knowing if you
had already checked these more common things.

- Take board out of case and only hook up bare essentials
only. NOT bare to running system, bare to POSTing. CPU,
heatsink fan, 1 memory module, video

- Clear CMOS with jumper (or pull battery for 10 minutes)
then plug AC into power supply. Check that power supply's
input voltage selection switch is set appropriate to your
location, IF it has such a switch (on the back next to power
socket).

- Short power-on pins together to start the board. If it
doesn't post and does't have integral buzzer or a speaker
connected, connect one. The correct pins to connect to
should be shown in the manual.

- If system still doesn't POST and no sounds from
speaker/buzzer, take PSU voltage readings.

"Most often", the problem is user misconfiguration of the
motherboard, cables not plugged in, inadequate or faulty
PSU, or failed motherboard (perhaps in that order). Rule
out the most common problems then move on to the more
obscure.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 7:55:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

ctlphd <DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:

> "ctlphd" wrote:
> > Could this be it??? The system fan on my old computer didn't
> > have a sensor wire and the new board requires one. I realized
> > this upon taking everything out of the box as you suggested
> > (and it still didn't work, and neither did the fan). So, I'll
> > order or go buy another fan (with 3 wires instead of 2) and
> > see how that works.
>
> I came across the fix of the problem upon trying multiple
> things. Clearing the CMOS setting makes everything work, but
> unfortunately I don’t know how to set it correctly permanently,
> so I have to clear it every time! Can anybody help with setting
> the CMOS?

Best to change as little as possible. Why don't you post the
things you want to change. Clearly doing so might make things easy
here.





--
I removed the other groups. This group is large enough, in my
opinion.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 8:22:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 19 Mar 2005 23:39:25 -0500, ctlphd
<DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:

>"ctlphd" wrote:
> > Could this be it??? The system fan on my old computer didn't
> > have a sensor wire and the new board requires one. I realized
> > this upon taking everything out of the box as you suggested
> > (and it still didn't work, and neither did the fan). So, I'll
> > order or go buy another fan (with 3 wires instead of 2) and
> > see how that works.
>
>I came across the fix of the problem upon trying multiple things.
>Clearing the CMOS setting makes everything work, but unfortunately I
>don’t know how to set it correctly permanently, so I have to clear it
>every time! Can anybody help with setting the CMOS?

???

Clear CMOS once. Upon next power-on, enter the bios setup
screens. Don't change anything yet except to set the clock
to the correct time. Save the settings and exit. See if
system POSTs again after that point.

You should not have to clear CMOS again unless you change
some other bios settings that're incompatible or you have
some other problem. If you do, note the time, if it's still
set correctly.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 8:04:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"kony" wrote:
> On 19 Mar 2005 23:39:25 -0500, ctlphd
> <DoNotEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:
>
> >"ctlphd" wrote:
>  > > Could this be it??? The system fan on my old
> computer didn't
>  > > have a sensor wire and the new board requires one.
> I realized
>  > > this upon taking everything out of the box as you
> suggested
>  > > (and it still didn't work, and neither did the fan).
> So, I'll
>  > > order or go buy another fan (with 3 wires instead of
> 2) and
>  > > see how that works.
> >
> >I came across the fix of the problem upon trying multiple
> things.
> >Clearing the CMOS setting makes everything work, but
> unfortunately I
> >don’t know how to set it correctly permanently, so I have to
> clear it
> >every time! Can anybody help with setting the CMOS?
>
> ???
>
> Clear CMOS once. Upon next power-on, enter the bios setup
> screens. Don't change anything yet except to set the clock
> to the correct time. Save the settings and exit. See if
> system POSTs again after that point.
>
> You should not have to clear CMOS again unless you change
> some other bios settings that're incompatible or you have
> some other problem. If you do, note the time, if it's still
> set correctly.

When I first post I get an error "CMOS Settings Incorrect" and
going into settings and changing even the time causes the
system not to POST. Going into the settings and making no
changes doesn’t cause any problem.
Also, if I bypass the CMOS/BIOS settings and accept default, it
goes to my boot loader sequence (GRUB) then either Fedora
Linux Core 3 or Windows XP Pro, and neither will load.
With Linux it stops with "Configuring kernel parameters",
for Windows, the monitor image indicating no signal comes
on, then blanks. This booting info may be jumping the gun,
but I thought it might give some clue as to what is wrong
with the CMOS settings.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=247034
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 20, 2005 11:26:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 17:04:48 -0000, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:


> > Clear CMOS once. Upon next power-on, enter the bios setup
> > screens. Don't change anything yet except to set the clock
> > to the correct time. Save the settings and exit. See if
> > system POSTs again after that point.
> >
> > You should not have to clear CMOS again unless you change
> > some other bios settings that're incompatible or you have
> > some other problem. If you do, note the time, if it's still
> > set correctly.
>
>When I first post I get an error "CMOS Settings Incorrect" and
>going into settings and changing even the time causes the
>system not to POST. Going into the settings and making no
>changes doesn’t cause any problem.
>Also, if I bypass the CMOS/BIOS settings and accept default, it
>goes to my boot loader sequence (GRUB) then either Fedora
>Linux Core 3 or Windows XP Pro, and neither will load.
>With Linux it stops with "Configuring kernel parameters",
>for Windows, the monitor image indicating no signal comes
>on, then blanks. This booting info may be jumping the gun,
>but I thought it might give some clue as to what is wrong
>with the CMOS settings.

Well you keep going off on a tangent, we still dont' know if
you've taken voltage readings, tested memory, etc.

AT this point I'm out of suggestions except that it's
"probably" one of 3 things. Power, memory, or bad board.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 21, 2005 9:50:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"kony" wrote:
> On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 17:04:48 -0000, ctlphd
> <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:
>
>
>  > > Clear CMOS once. Upon next power-on, enter the bios
> setup
>  > > screens. Don't change anything yet except to set
> the clock
>  > > to the correct time. Save the settings and exit.
> See if
>  > > system POSTs again after that point.
>  > >
>  > > You should not have to clear CMOS again unless you
> change
>  > > some other bios settings that're incompatible or you
> have
>  > > some other problem. If you do, note the time, if
> it's still
>  > > set correctly.
> >
> >When I first post I get an error "CMOS Settings Incorrect"
> and
> >going into settings and changing even the time causes the
> >system not to POST. Going into the settings and making no
> >changes doesn’t cause any problem.
> >Also, if I bypass the CMOS/BIOS settings and accept default,
> it
> >goes to my boot loader sequence (GRUB) then either Fedora
> >Linux Core 3 or Windows XP Pro, and neither will load.
> >With Linux it stops with "Configuring kernel parameters",
> >for Windows, the monitor image indicating no signal comes
> >on, then blanks. This booting info may be jumping the gun,
> >but I thought it might give some clue as to what is wrong
> >with the CMOS settings.
>
> Well you keep going off on a tangent, we still dont' know if
> you've taken voltage readings, tested memory, etc.
>
> AT this point I'm out of suggestions except that it's
> "probably" one of 3 things. Power, memory, or bad board.

Sorry, now that the system ’Posted’, I thought the likely
problems, causes, and solutions had changed. But, you’re
indicating that isn’t the case.

I checked the voltage at the two main points where it
connects to the mainboard, and it was about 2-3 mV at
each. I have 2 184 pin DDR-DIMMs (512 MB ea), which
I had removed separately, and I repeated this just now,
with no difference in the boot process with 512 MB.

--
Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/Home-Built-power-mainboar...
Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=247178
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 21, 2005 9:50:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"ctlphd" wrote:
> Well you keep going off on a tangent, we still dont' know if
> you've taken voltage readings, tested memory, etc.
>
> AT this point I'm out of suggestions except that it's
> "probably" one of 3 things. Power, memory, or bad board.
>
>
> Sorry, now that the system 'Posted', I thought the likely
> problems, causes, and solutions had changed. But, you're
> indicating that isn't the case.
>
> I checked the voltage at the two main points where it
> connects to the mainboard, and it was about 2-3 mV at
> each. I have 2 184 pin DDR-DIMMs (512 MB ea), which
> I had removed separately, and I repeated this just now,
> with no difference in the boot process with 512 MB.

There are also 4 diagnostic LEDs which I just connected:
They indicate that the processor is not damaged or installed
improperly.
Memory is correct and intact. VGA BIOS is intact. Real time clock.
Bios sign on. Base and extended memory test. Assign resources to ISA.
Initializing hard drive controller. Initializing floppy drive
controller.
Boot attempt. OS booting.

When booting to Linux, all lights showed green indicating normal
functioning.
Finally, I was able to edit the Linux boot command and am now editing
this last
paragraph from within Linux on the new machine.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 22, 2005 4:02:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:50:21 -0000, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:


>Sorry, now that the system ’Posted’, I thought the likely
>problems, causes, and solutions had changed. But, you’re
>indicating that isn’t the case.
>
>I checked the voltage at the two main points where it
>connects to the mainboard, and it was about 2-3 mV at
>each. I have 2 184 pin DDR-DIMMs (512 MB ea), which
>I had removed separately, and I repeated this just now,
>with no difference in the boot process with 512 MB.


You're not measuring voltage correctly if you're getting 2-3
mV, else your power supply is completely dead which it
doesn't appear to be else you'd be getting no activity at
all.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 22, 2005 4:06:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 19 Mar 2005 23:46:10 -0500, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> wrote:



>As I said, I did strip it down to the bare essentials, main board,
>power supply, video board, monitor, and it still didn’t work, until I
>cleared the CMOS, and then it did. But now I don’t know how to set
>the CMOS, because every time it goes back to an unusable
>configuration.


Yes, but this thread has been so round-about and
disorganized that I'm beginning to forget even what's been
discussed.

My impression is that you have either a user
misconfiguration of cables/cards/etc, a faulty motherboard,
or inadequate power supply. I'm not sure of this, but am
out of ideas. If you have some spare parts you could swap
in it might help. That's all I have to offer, if I had to
GUESS at which part was the problem that guess would be the
motherboard, that you should return it to seller if
possible.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 22, 2005 9:35:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:50:21 -0000, ctlphd
<UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> put finger to keyboard and
composed:

>I checked the voltage at the two main points where it
>connects to the mainboard, and it was about 2-3 mV at
>each.

Just so you can be sure you are measuring voltage correctly, measure
the voltage of a 1.5V battery.


- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
March 22, 2005 9:35:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.hardware.homedesigned,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 18:35:32 +1100, Franc Zabkar
<fzabkar@optussnet.com.au> wrote:

>On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:50:21 -0000, ctlphd
><UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> put finger to keyboard and
>composed:
>
>>I checked the voltage at the two main points where it
>>connects to the mainboard, and it was about 2-3 mV at
>>each.
>
>Just so you can be sure you are measuring voltage correctly, measure
>the voltage of a 1.5V battery.
>
>
>- Franc Zabkar


I had a passing thought that maybe this was a measurement of
the video card output still, but I thought I'd covered that.
In case there is still that confusion I meant measurements
of the power supply voltages.

This system might be a good candidate for the local computer
shop, if nothing else they have some spare parts around.
!