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Where to learn everything?

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 11, 2005 6:34:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
if you know of something.

More about : learn

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 11, 2005 8:20:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

This is a bit old, but it's a start.
part1
http://www.anandtech.com/showdoc.html?i=283&p=1
part2
http://www.anandtech.com/showdoc.html?i=287&p=1


"pez" <pezjb@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:e7c6f$4259e234$455da0d2$24198@allthenewsgroups.com...
> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
> if you know of something.
>
April 11, 2005 1:06:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"pez" <pezjb@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:e7c6f$4259e234$455da0d2$24198@allthenewsgroups.com...
> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
> if you know of something.
>

www.tomshardware.com is pretty good.
Related resources
April 11, 2005 5:36:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

pez wrote:
> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
> if you know of something.
>

You have been given several good starting points, but I cannot resist
saying one thing: I have been working on computers for years, and I
doubt that I will ever "Learn everything" about them. Just when you
think you are getting pretty good, you encounter a problem that humbles
you! It is fun however. Good luck!
April 11, 2005 6:52:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
news:a3v6e.558561$w62.221942@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> pez wrote:
>> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
>> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
>> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
>> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
>> if you know of something.
>>
>
> You have been given several good starting points, but I cannot resist
> saying one thing: I have been working on computers for years, and I doubt
> that I will ever "Learn everything" about them. Just when you think you
> are getting pretty good, you encounter a problem that humbles you! It is
> fun however. Good luck!

Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few years ago.
I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was relatively easy to
keep up to date. I want to get back into it now (more as a hobby than
anything else) and things have changed so much.
For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2 options:
IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE. Fast SCSI. Now
there's about 50 different options!
April 11, 2005 6:52:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 14:52:37 +0100, "johnp"
<johndontemailme@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>"Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
>news:a3v6e.558561$w62.221942@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>> pez wrote:
>>> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
>>> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
>>> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
>>> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
>>> if you know of something.
>>>
>>
>> You have been given several good starting points, but I cannot resist
>> saying one thing: I have been working on computers for years, and I doubt
>> that I will ever "Learn everything" about them. Just when you think you
>> are getting pretty good, you encounter a problem that humbles you! It is
>> fun however. Good luck!
>
>Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few years ago.
>I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was relatively easy to
>keep up to date. I want to get back into it now (more as a hobby than
>anything else) and things have changed so much.
>For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2 options:
>IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE. Fast SCSI. Now
>there's about 50 different options!
>

Computers are a lot like old radio technology used to be. at first it
was build your own, then various stages of manufactured sets. there
was a hey day of radio culture that was The Thing. That culture has
been pretty much overrun with commercials, payola, corporate
ownership, and good old talk radio propaganda.

Computers have gone through the same stages and are about to be
overrun by Billy Gates' and his get out of jail free government
buddies' Longhorn safe computing big brother network.

You won't have to know much pretty soon. They will do all the
thinking for you.

Eventually it'll all be built into the frame of a 42" LCD display.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 11, 2005 9:40:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 02:34:28 +0000,
pezjb@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (pez) put finger to keyboard and
composed:

>Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
>pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
>work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
>if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
>if you know of something.

Scott Mueller's "Upgrading and Repairing PCs" is considered by many to
be the definitive reference work.

http://www.upgradingandrepairingpcs.com/
http://www.quepublishing.com/promotions/promotion.asp?p...


- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
April 12, 2005 3:33:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"pez" <pezjb@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:e7c6f$4259e234$455da0d2$24198@allthenewsgroups.com...
> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
> if you know of something.
>

I started by adding hardware to an old pc I had. I bought a few books and
the best for me was the A+ Certification for Dummies book. :-)

I think it was a great book to start with (easy read). My A+ Certification
cost me under $100 and that was just for the books. Most of which were not
that helpful compared to the Dummies book. If you google it you can find the
latest version for around $20. I did a lot of the free online A+ tests and
got comfortable with the questions and terms. I have a bunch of links on my
website that I had used. Not all of my links still work as some have been
taken down. The free test links were very helpful to me when I took the test
(2000).

I've since built all my own computers and do a little sidework fixing others
peoples. Most of that is software related anymore.

Good luck,
--
Tip
www.gotips.net
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 15, 2005 6:37:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"johnp" <johndontemailme@gmail.com> skrev i melding
news:425a80de_4@x-privat.org...

------------

> Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few years ago.
> I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was relatively easy to
> keep up to date. I want to get back into it now (more as a hobby than
> anything else) and things have changed so much.
> For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2 options:
> IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE. Fast SCSI. Now
> there's about 50 different options!

1 - Usual IDE-drives
2 - IDE RAID
3 - SATA
4 - SATA RAID
5 - External harddrives (USBII/Firewire)
6 - SCSI

Any more categories?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 15, 2005 6:37:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

Geir Klemetsen wrote:
> "johnp" <johndontemailme@gmail.com> skrev i melding
> news:425a80de_4@x-privat.org...
>
> ------------
>
>> Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few
>> years ago. I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was
>> relatively easy to keep up to date. I want to get back into it now
>> (more as a hobby than anything else) and things have changed so much.
>> For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2
>> options: IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE.
>> Fast SCSI. Now there's about 50 different options!
>
> 1 - Usual IDE-drives
> 2 - IDE RAID
> 3 - SATA
> 4 - SATA RAID
> 5 - External harddrives (USBII/Firewire)
> 6 - SCSI
>
> Any more categories?

7 -iSCSI
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 16, 2005 1:42:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

6 & 7. A few different versions of SCSI (Ultra, Wide, UltraWide, 160 , 320,
LVD....)...


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"S.Heenan" <sheenan@wahs.ac> kirjoitti viestissä
news:SiP7e.1023953$8l.960006@pd7tw1no...
> Geir Klemetsen wrote:
> > "johnp" <johndontemailme@gmail.com> skrev i melding
> > news:425a80de_4@x-privat.org...
> >
> > ------------
> >
> >> Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few
> >> years ago. I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was
> >> relatively easy to keep up to date. I want to get back into it now
> >> (more as a hobby than anything else) and things have changed so much.
> >> For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2
> >> options: IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE.
> >> Fast SCSI. Now there's about 50 different options!
> >
> > 1 - Usual IDE-drives
> > 2 - IDE RAID
> > 3 - SATA
> > 4 - SATA RAID
> > 5 - External harddrives (USBII/Firewire)
> > 6 - SCSI
> >
> > Any more categories?
>
> 7 -iSCSI
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 16, 2005 1:48:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

And I forgot NAS (network storage)...


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"Thomas Wendell" <tumppiw_NOSPAM@hotmail.com> kirjoitti viestissä
news:42600a8c$1_2@news.dnainternet.net...
> 6 & 7. A few different versions of SCSI (Ultra, Wide, UltraWide, 160 ,
320,
> LVD....)...
>
>
> --
> Tumppi
> Reply to group
> =================================================
> Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
> Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
> (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
> =================================================
>
>
>
> "S.Heenan" <sheenan@wahs.ac> kirjoitti viestissä
> news:SiP7e.1023953$8l.960006@pd7tw1no...
> > Geir Klemetsen wrote:
> > > "johnp" <johndontemailme@gmail.com> skrev i melding
> > > news:425a80de_4@x-privat.org...
> > >
> > > ------------
> > >
> > >> Very true. Also its changing much quicker these days than a few
> > >> years ago. I used to be into hardware a few years back and it was
> > >> relatively easy to keep up to date. I want to get back into it now
> > >> (more as a hobby than anything else) and things have changed so much.
> > >> For example, when I used to put HD into a machine I had one of 2
> > >> options: IDE or SCSI. It was a relatively easy choice. Cheap IDE.
> > >> Fast SCSI. Now there's about 50 different options!
> > >
> > > 1 - Usual IDE-drives
> > > 2 - IDE RAID
> > > 3 - SATA
> > > 4 - SATA RAID
> > > 5 - External harddrives (USBII/Firewire)
> > > 6 - SCSI
> > >
> > > Any more categories?
> >
> > 7 -iSCSI
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
April 21, 2005 3:08:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

"pez" <pezjb@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:e7c6f$4259e234$455da0d2$24198@allthenewsgroups.com...
> Does anyone have a good website or book (pref. website) where I can
> pretty much learn everything about computers from hardware, how they
> work, terms, repair, networking, anything... virtually a library. IDK
> if there is anything out there like that, but please leave me a link
> if you know of something.
>

whatever you do dont buy any books

first idnetify the components of a PC and what they require to be connected
to the motherboard and go from there, the motherboard is the restricting
facor of building a computer, it defines what you can have in our computer
system and may limit future upgradability so choose one carefully. it would
be a good idea to read up on processors and their respective sockets
etc.etc.

go on the net, read about things like IDE and SATA and DDR DIMMS, SIMMS
SDRAM all that stuff, read about AGP, read about PCI read about PCI-Express,
read about USB 2.0 and IEEE1394, read about ATX and just read as much u can,
its all on the net for free

a year i ago i knew nothing, i never knew where to begin

now i am pretty good, i have built about 12 computers for ppl my brother
knows and a few of my friends and of course some other people.

One stumbling block for me was the processor sockets.

I will tell you now though, you will never knwo everything it is progressing
at such a pace that its hard to keep on top of it. just keep reading though!

HTH

and gluck

Christo
!