Monster Gaming Rig - opinions on this spec sought pls

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
option' type of budget.

The criteria for this build in order of importance are;

Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
-
Silent running - A water cooled CPU, Hard disk in a sound dampening
enclosure and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.
Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan. The theory
being that the slightly higher pressure will vent air out the side and
prevent dust from entering. Secondly the lack of an exhaust fan will
quieten the box since much of the noise generated by the PC is the
turbulent air coming out the back. Hopefully since the CPU is water
cooled, removing that heat from the inside of the case, there won't be
any need for further ventilation.
-
Stylish look - opting for the diNivo keyboard and an LCD monitor with
the silver shark case hopefully will make this PC look attractive on the
desktop too.

So here's the spec, opinions and constructive criticism is greatly
welcomed...

Thermaltake Shark Case (silver)
Thermaltake Aquarius III Water Cooling

Asus A8N-SLI Deluxe motherboard
Athlon64 4000+ cpu
Corsair TwinX XMS3200 (2-2-2-5)
Asustek GeForce 6800GT (2x for SLI mode)
Tagan 480w quiet PSU

Samsung SM913N 19" LCD monitor
Logitech diNivo Keyboard + Mouse package
--
Stoneskin

[Insert sig text here]
10 answers Last reply
More about monster gaming opinions spec sought
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 10:44:34 +0100, Stoneskin
    <no@thanks.com> wrote:

    >So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
    >option' type of budget.
    >
    >The criteria for this build in order of importance are;
    >
    >Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
    >cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
    >-
    >Silent running - A water cooled CPU,

    Be sure you use a fan near the CPU too, because the
    motherboard needs airflow. Simply using a water block is an
    inferior solution to using a traditional heatsink/fan UNLESS
    you also use the fan for this aux. purpose. It need not be
    audible, just some airflow and this could become MUCH more
    important considering the mention you make below about
    altering the typical exhaust implementation/suggests by both
    major CPU manufacturers.


    >Hard disk in a sound dampening
    >enclosure

    They are likely to run hotter and have shorter lifespan.
    If you have a good thick case that is structurally fit a
    modern drive should not be very loud, contrasted to the
    whiney noise of the older ball-bearing drives.


    >and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.


    How thick? A 25mm thick 120 mm fan ran at inaudible noise
    levels is not sufficient for the parts (video cards and
    expected higher-end CPU/etc typical in high-end systems).

    >Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
    >prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
    >into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan.

    Maybe, but that's not necessarily true. All you really need
    is the intake rate to be higher than the exaust, which
    shouldn't be too hard with 120mm intake, but again, a thin
    120mm fan running at low RPM (ESPECIALLY with a filtered
    intake) and only the PSU exhaust, will not be sufficient
    airflow. The system might run stable but it'll run hotter
    and be shorter lived.


    >The theory
    >being that the slightly higher pressure will vent air out the side and
    >prevent dust from entering.

    True to a certain extent. It is essential to have either
    balanced or positive pressure to prevent dust from getting
    in all the little cracks and drive openings. What will end
    up happening is that you have to make a compromise in filter
    medium, that a very dense filter simply won't allow enough
    airflow even with fans operating at speeds/noise-levels
    higher than you want them. Dense filters reduce airflow
    over 80%. So with the less dense filter you'll have the
    ability to run the system with low noise and keep out large
    dust particles but a very fine dust will still get into the
    case, and the majority of it will stay in the case because
    you have low exhaust rate at the very top rear (which is the
    right place to exhaust but nevertheless reduces dust
    expelled also).


    >Secondly the lack of an exhaust fan will
    >quieten the box since much of the noise generated by the PC is the
    >turbulent air coming out the back.

    Actually the front fan may offset that. Air coming out the
    back isn't necessarily turbulent if you remove any
    stamped-in-metal grills, and ideally, remove any round wire
    (typically chrome) grills also... so long as the cables and
    any other children/pets/etc cant' gain access to rear of
    system.

    The quiestest setup is with a rear 120mm exhaust. Problem
    is what you already mentioned, this does not prevent dust
    fro entering everywhere.


    >Hopefully since the CPU is water
    >cooled, removing that heat from the inside of the case, there won't be
    >any need for further ventilation.

    CPU is not the only power consumer, thus not the only heat
    producer. Think of it this way- CPU may use an average of
    60W, a lot more when gaming. Your power supply will
    typically be producing over 200W, let's call it 230W for
    that dual-video config (including all other parts). Thus,
    water cooling the CPU is only removing 60/230, 26% of the
    heat. Thus you can reduce airflow only 26% over the regular
    _audible_ fan rates everyone else would use, except you will
    still have the need to cool the motherboard- Gaming will
    put a continuous higher load on CPU, such that when it uses
    more power the motherboard gets hotter too, not only
    northbridge but power regulation circuitry. Again a fan
    could be at a rate low enough it's quiet and very
    long-lasting (providing you choose a fan of decent quality
    and thick enough to have a good bearing- Panaflo, Papst
    sleeve bearing or a name-brand dual ball-bearing fan at
    least 15mm, preferribly 20mm thick or more.


    >-
    >Stylish look - opting for the diNivo keyboard and an LCD monitor with
    >the silver shark case hopefully will make this PC look attractive on the
    >desktop too.

    So long as your case intake area isn't stylized in such a
    way that it sacrificess intake rate in order to look more
    stylized.


    >
    >So here's the spec, opinions and constructive criticism is greatly
    >welcomed...
    >
    >Thermaltake Shark Case (silver)

    If it's aluminum, IMO it's not going to be very sturdy with
    the 120mm fans in it. Well, within the context that you
    would be getting better airflow and lower noise by cutting
    out the stamped-in grills, even though they're not as
    restrictive as some. I have a couple of the older style and
    find the aluminum isn't nearly as sturdy as the steel
    version. Preferribly Al large(r) cases should be a minimum
    of 1.2mm thick sheeting, maybe even more with the larger fan
    cutouts.

    In other words, it's an at-least average quality case,
    perhaps higher than average, but still will be a bit out of
    place and add more eyecandy than a solid foundation.

    Further, the sideways front drive bays are handy but further
    reduce airflow... system airflow but also with a drive(s) in
    sound dampening enclosures your drives may bake.


    >Thermaltake Aquarius III Water Cooling

    Like the case, it's a bit outclassed by the other system
    components. Even so, if it's only cooling the CPU it may be
    satisfactory. It's certainly not enough to cool the CPU
    _plus_ the video cards.

    IMO, you are expecting a LOT of heat to flow through the
    power supply exhaust, when it will be producing a fair
    amount of heat for the parts already. IMO, it will not be a
    good setup to "only" put a front filtered 120x25mm fan in
    the stock case (unmodded) and have only the PSU exhaust.

    The "easiest" first-step in further mods (beyond cutting out
    the grills on both sides of both fans) would be putting a
    filtered side-intake fan low enough on the side panel that a
    portion of the airflow gets under both video cards. With
    both of these filtered intakes you should have enough flow
    to use a few low RPM exhaust fan on the rear case wall
    beneath the power supply, where one is typically found.

    Either way, if you've not dealt with a fairly well-filtered
    case before, keep in mind that every few months you MUST
    clean the filters and/or check the case pressurization as
    even a modest amount of dust accumulation on the filters
    will significantly alter the intake flow rate.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    kony left a note on my windscreen which said:

    > >So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
    > >option' type of budget.
    > >
    > >The criteria for this build in order of importance are;
    > >
    > >Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
    > >cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
    > >-
    > >Silent running - A water cooled CPU,

    Firstly, thanks for the advice.

    > Be sure you use a fan near the CPU too, because the
    > motherboard needs airflow. Simply using a water block is an
    > inferior solution to using a traditional heatsink/fan UNLESS
    > you also use the fan for this aux. purpose. It need not be
    > audible, just some airflow and this could become MUCH more
    > important considering the mention you make below about
    > altering the typical exhaust implementation/suggests by both
    > major CPU manufacturers.

    Noted. Although how to accomplish this? As far as I am aware with a
    water cooled system the normal cpu heatsink mountings are removed in
    favour of the new waterblock. Would I have to modify the case or
    components in such a way to make a fan mountable over the motherboard or
    perhaps on the side of the case?

    > >Hard disk in a sound dampening
    > >enclosure
    >
    > They are likely to run hotter and have shorter lifespan.
    > If you have a good thick case that is structurally fit a
    > modern drive should not be very loud, contrasted to the
    > whiney noise of the older ball-bearing drives.

    I have wondered about the temperature problem with the drive enclosed.
    To be honest I may consider not installing this initially but see how
    loud the PC is and consider this as a further option should the 'first
    build' be too loud for my tastes.

    > >and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.
    >
    > How thick? A 25mm thick 120 mm fan ran at inaudible noise
    > levels is not sufficient for the parts (video cards and
    > expected higher-end CPU/etc typical in high-end systems).

    To be perfectly honest I was not aware of the differing thickness
    available in fans. Would there be any particular makes you would
    recommend?

    > >Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
    > >prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
    > >into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan.
    >
    > Maybe, but that's not necessarily true. All you really need
    > is the intake rate to be higher than the exaust, which
    > shouldn't be too hard with 120mm intake, but again, a thin
    > 120mm fan running at low RPM (ESPECIALLY with a filtered
    > intake) and only the PSU exhaust, will not be sufficient
    > airflow. The system might run stable but it'll run hotter
    > and be shorter lived.

    I love the look of the shark case but I'm not sure it's design is
    suitable for this system. The open grill on the side could cause
    problems with extra noise, the front door may restrict airflow etc. I
    haven't given up on the case just yet because the features such as the
    removable tray, the pre-drilled holes for the water cooling system, the
    side mounting hardrives etc. I really like. I will look at alternative
    cases with venting in mind - any suggestions where I should start?

    > IMO, you are expecting a LOT of heat to flow through the
    > power supply exhaust, when it will be producing a fair
    > amount of heat for the parts already. IMO, it will not be a
    > good setup to "only" put a front filtered 120x25mm fan in
    > the stock case (unmodded) and have only the PSU exhaust.

    Assuming I add a 120mm fan to the rear in order to exhaust more hot air
    from the case I'm not sure how I would fix a fan to cool the board
    components.

    Would it be more advisable to install a more conventional Heatsink + fan
    for the cpu. Which coolers have a 'cool and quiet' reputation?

    --
    Stoneskin

    [Insert sig text here]
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Stoneskin wrote:

    " To be perfectly honest I was not aware of the differing thickness
    available in fans. Would there be any particular makes you would
    recommend? "


    - Thermaltake Thunderblade 120MM 78CFM 21dBA
    http://www.thermaltake.com/dcfans/led/thunderblade120.htm

    - Vantec Spectrum Fan Card SP-FC70-BL http://www.vantec.com.tw/
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Cuzman left a note on my windscreen which said:

    > Stoneskin wrote:
    >
    > " To be perfectly honest I was not aware of the differing thickness
    > available in fans. Would there be any particular makes you would
    > recommend? "
    >
    >
    > - Thermaltake Thunderblade 120MM 78CFM 21dBA
    > http://www.thermaltake.com/dcfans/led/thunderblade120.htm
    >
    > - Vantec Spectrum Fan Card SP-FC70-BL http://www.vantec.com.tw/

    Thank you!
    --
    Stoneskin

    [Insert sig text here]
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 13:10:34 +0100, Stoneskin
    <no@thanks.com> wrote:

    >kony left a note on my windscreen which said:
    >
    >> >So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
    >> >option' type of budget.
    >> >
    >> >The criteria for this build in order of importance are;
    >> >
    >> >Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
    >> >cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
    >> >-
    >> >Silent running - A water cooled CPU,
    >
    >Firstly, thanks for the advice.

    While it's on my mind, let me make a distinction about the
    water-cooling. If you plan to overclock a lot, it could be
    very helpful to have, particularly with the P4. Realize
    though that a water pump and (radiator fan is pretty
    important for high-heat CPUs/overclocking) fan aren't
    necessarily any quieter than just a CPU heatsink fan, BUT
    there is the potential for lower CPU temp, so the variable
    is whether you "need" that lower CPU temp. Most people
    don't, but it is a personal choice and could be done well
    either way... most people don't have the dual video cards
    either so it's your toy and you should have fun tweaking it.


    >
    >> Be sure you use a fan near the CPU too, because the
    >> motherboard needs airflow. Simply using a water block is an
    >> inferior solution to using a traditional heatsink/fan UNLESS
    >> you also use the fan for this aux. purpose. It need not be
    >> audible, just some airflow and this could become MUCH more
    >> important considering the mention you make below about
    >> altering the typical exhaust implementation/suggests by both
    >> major CPU manufacturers.
    >
    >Noted. Although how to accomplish this? As far as I am aware with a
    >water cooled system the normal cpu heatsink mountings are removed in
    >favour of the new waterblock. Would I have to modify the case or
    >components in such a way to make a fan mountable over the motherboard or
    >perhaps on the side of the case?

    Perhaps you can tap holes into the water block and put riser
    studs in it to mount a fan. Perhaps using epoxy or other
    method of attaching screw mount points or a fan frame or ???
    I usually mount the board in the case and nothing more, look
    at it REAL good and do nothing to it for a few days, letting
    different scenarios play around in the back of my mind
    before proceeding. Then again, I'm not usually in a rush to
    build my own systems and same thing/different-day would be
    boreing.

    One thing you could do is drill undersized holes and use
    long sheet-metal (type threaded) screws to mount a fan on
    the top edge of the rear I/O panel mounting... at least IIRC
    there is a ledge along that area but you'd need pretty
    tightly sized screws or just machine bolts and nuts maybe.

    There might be an option to hang a fan off of the
    northbridge, if you epoxied one on (but that voids the
    warranty on the board). If you are comfortable working with
    metal there are all sorts of interesting brackets you could
    build. I usually use at least .06" aluminum as it looks
    better long-term than steel, and is easier to shape. It
    might not look good though if you don't have a metal brake
    and other misc tools to form it regularly.

    I don't recall the THermaltake water-block either, there
    might be other blocks (or kits w/block) tha yield themselves
    more to mounting a fan.


    >
    >> >Hard disk in a sound dampening
    >> >enclosure
    >>
    >> They are likely to run hotter and have shorter lifespan.
    >> If you have a good thick case that is structurally fit a
    >> modern drive should not be very loud, contrasted to the
    >> whiney noise of the older ball-bearing drives.
    >
    >I have wondered about the temperature problem with the drive enclosed.
    >To be honest I may consider not installing this initially but see how
    >loud the PC is and consider this as a further option should the 'first
    >build' be too loud for my tastes.

    Admittedly it's going to be a trade-off, noise vs. cooling
    when you have a lot of high-heat parts and expectations to
    push them (as with gaming). I like filters and yet they
    compound this by reducing flow to a fraction of unfiltered
    rate if they're very effective.


    >
    >> >and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.
    >>
    >> How thick? A 25mm thick 120 mm fan ran at inaudible noise
    >> levels is not sufficient for the parts (video cards and
    >> expected higher-end CPU/etc typical in high-end systems).
    >
    >To be perfectly honest I was not aware of the differing thickness
    >available in fans. Would there be any particular makes you would
    >recommend?

    You may not have any choice, if the case doesn't allow
    thicker fans because of where the drive rack is.

    Generally though, for a filtered fan you always want the
    thickest fan possible, because thin axial fans are the worst
    at maintaining the pressure difference through the filter
    medium. Thicker fans also move more air at lower RPM so
    they're quieter and longer-lasting (all other things being
    equal which they seldom are). Typical thicker fan would be
    32mm, maybe you can find a quiet Papst in 38mm. Most common
    good choice for quiet fan though is a Panaflo like this one
    (though they might be cheaper elsewhere and again, I dont'
    know if that case will allow a thicker fan in the front, but
    it's a great fan for exhaust).

    http://www.directron.com/120l1a.html


    >
    >> >Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
    >> >prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
    >> >into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan.
    >>
    >> Maybe, but that's not necessarily true. All you really need
    >> is the intake rate to be higher than the exaust, which
    >> shouldn't be too hard with 120mm intake, but again, a thin
    >> 120mm fan running at low RPM (ESPECIALLY with a filtered
    >> intake) and only the PSU exhaust, will not be sufficient
    >> airflow. The system might run stable but it'll run hotter
    >> and be shorter lived.
    >
    >I love the look of the shark case but I'm not sure it's design is
    >suitable for this system. The open grill on the side could cause
    >problems with extra noise, the front door may restrict airflow etc. I
    >haven't given up on the case just yet because the features such as the
    >removable tray, the pre-drilled holes for the water cooling system, the
    >side mounting hardrives etc. I really like. I will look at alternative
    >cases with venting in mind - any suggestions where I should start?

    It ought to be one that catches your eye so it's better to
    just look over a bunch somewhere with good pictures of the
    interiors like Newegg,
    http://www2.newegg.com/ProductSort/SubCategory.asp?SubCategory=7

    I dont' know of any that do a very good job of filtering and
    with low noise but retaining high flow rate though, which is
    partly why I usually mod older cases... but I don't care
    much how they look as they get shoved under a desk.


    >
    >> IMO, you are expecting a LOT of heat to flow through the
    >> power supply exhaust, when it will be producing a fair
    >> amount of heat for the parts already. IMO, it will not be a
    >> good setup to "only" put a front filtered 120x25mm fan in
    >> the stock case (unmodded) and have only the PSU exhaust.
    >
    >Assuming I add a 120mm fan to the rear in order to exhaust more hot air
    >from the case I'm not sure how I would fix a fan to cool the board
    >components.

    The rear exahaust fan will help cool the board too, that in
    conjunction with a PSU having bottom intake may be enough,
    you might try it and see... but you didn't even mention the
    CPU nore any plans (or lack thereof) towards overclocking
    either, unless I overlooked it.

    >
    >Would it be more advisable to install a more conventional Heatsink + fan
    >for the cpu. Which coolers have a 'cool and quiet' reputation?

    Either will work so long as you're mindful of the issues.
    The Thermalright 'sinks are pretty good, obviously going up
    the product line for better performance. Substitute your
    own fan (similar to the rear fan I linked, an appropriately
    sized diameter and thickest-allowable) like a Panaflo and
    further reducing it's speed as much as possible would be the
    other low noise solution.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 10:44:34 +0100, Stoneskin <no@thanks.com> wrote:

    >So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
    >option' type of budget.
    >
    >The criteria for this build in order of importance are;
    >
    >Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
    >cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
    >-
    >Silent running - A water cooled CPU, Hard disk in a sound dampening
    >enclosure and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.
    >Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
    >prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
    >into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan. The theory
    >being that the slightly higher pressure will vent air out the side and
    >prevent dust from entering. Secondly the lack of an exhaust fan will
    >quieten the box since much of the noise generated by the PC is the
    >turbulent air coming out the back. Hopefully since the CPU is water
    >cooled, removing that heat from the inside of the case, there won't be
    >any need for further ventilation.
    >-
    >Stylish look - opting for the diNivo keyboard and an LCD monitor with
    >the silver shark case hopefully will make this PC look attractive on the
    >desktop too.
    >
    >So here's the spec, opinions and constructive criticism is greatly
    >welcomed...
    >
    >Thermaltake Shark Case (silver)
    >Thermaltake Aquarius III Water Cooling
    >
    >Asus A8N-SLI Deluxe motherboard
    >Athlon64 4000+ cpu
    >Corsair TwinX XMS3200 (2-2-2-5)
    >Asustek GeForce 6800GT (2x for SLI mode)
    >Tagan 480w quiet PSU
    >
    >Samsung SM913N 19" LCD monitor
    >Logitech diNivo Keyboard + Mouse package


    How about the following:
    Monitor: Dell 24" Widescreen UltraSharpTM 2405FPW Flat Panel Monitor
    PSU: PC Power & Cooling Turbo-Cool 850 SSI PSU
    Hard Drives: 2 x 74gig Western Digital Raptor SATA Drives, RAID0 & 300
    gig (or higher) drive for data
    Memory: At least 2 gigs worth of the Corsair


    If it was me i would go with an FX-55 cpu on this board or Dual
    Opterons 275's (For quad power) on a Thunder K8WE board. Thats if
    money is not an object though..
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    NoneOfBusiness left a note on my windscreen which said:

    > Monitor: Dell 24" Widescreen UltraSharpTM 2405FPW Flat Panel Monitor
    > PSU: PC Power & Cooling Turbo-Cool 850 SSI PSU
    > Hard Drives: 2 x 74gig Western Digital Raptor SATA Drives, RAID0 & 300
    > gig (or higher) drive for data
    > Memory: At least 2 gigs worth of the Corsair

    The main reason for not going larger on the screen size is that I have
    yet to find a >20" with a quoted 8ms response. The monitor in my spec
    is a 19" Samsung rated at 8ms with grey to grey response (accoding to
    tomshardware) up to 27ms. Which seemed to me one of the best for gaming
    purposes.

    As far as gaming goes I'm don't think dual raptors would be all that
    beneficial although it is something I have considered.

    2GB is certainly an option :)

    > If it was me i would go with an FX-55 cpu on this board or Dual
    > Opterons 275's (For quad power) on a Thunder K8WE board. Thats if
    > money is not an object though..

    This build money is 'almost' money no object. I think the price
    increase to go for the bleeding edge FX-55 is just not worth it.

    FX-55 = £540
    4000+ = £345


    --
    Stoneskin

    [Insert sig text here]
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    kony left a note on my windscreen which said:

    > While it's on my mind, let me make a distinction about the
    > water-cooling. If you plan to overclock a lot, it could be
    > very helpful to have, particularly with the P4. Realize
    > though that a water pump and (radiator fan is pretty
    > important for high-heat CPUs/overclocking) fan aren't
    > necessarily any quieter than just a CPU heatsink fan, BUT
    > there is the potential for lower CPU temp, so the variable
    > is whether you "need" that lower CPU temp. Most people
    > don't, but it is a personal choice and could be done well
    > either way... most people don't have the dual video cards
    > either so it's your toy and you should have fun tweaking it.

    The main point here is that I won't be overclocking the cpu. Extreme
    cooling isn't what I want to build the system around. 'Stock'
    performance with near silent running is my main objective.

    > I don't recall the THermaltake water-block either, there
    > might be other blocks (or kits w/block) tha yield themselves
    > more to mounting a fan.

    I think what I will do initially is build the system with a convential
    air cooled cpu. Something like the Arctic Cooling Silencer 64 Ultra TC
    seems to perform slightly better than the AMD cooler yet quieter.

    I think it's best if I build to this and then take further steps with
    even quieter cooling equipment later if I need it.

    --
    Stoneskin

    [Insert sig text here]
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 3 May 2005 11:46:45 +0100, Stoneskin <no@thanks.com> wrote:

    >NoneOfBusiness left a note on my windscreen which said:
    >
    >> Monitor: Dell 24" Widescreen UltraSharpTM 2405FPW Flat Panel Monitor
    >> PSU: PC Power & Cooling Turbo-Cool 850 SSI PSU
    >> Hard Drives: 2 x 74gig Western Digital Raptor SATA Drives, RAID0 & 300
    >> gig (or higher) drive for data
    >> Memory: At least 2 gigs worth of the Corsair
    >
    >The main reason for not going larger on the screen size is that I have
    >yet to find a >20" with a quoted 8ms response. The monitor in my spec
    >is a 19" Samsung rated at 8ms with grey to grey response (accoding to
    >tomshardware) up to 27ms. Which seemed to me one of the best for gaming
    >purposes.
    >
    >As far as gaming goes I'm don't think dual raptors would be all that
    >beneficial although it is something I have considered.
    >
    >2GB is certainly an option :)
    >
    >> If it was me i would go with an FX-55 cpu on this board or Dual
    >> Opterons 275's (For quad power) on a Thunder K8WE board. Thats if
    >> money is not an object though..
    >
    >This build money is 'almost' money no object. I think the price
    >increase to go for the bleeding edge FX-55 is just not worth it.
    >
    >FX-55 = £540
    >4000+ = £345
    The 24' Dell has listed a 12ms response and to be honest you are not
    likely to notice the difference between that and 8.. if you can, your
    eyesight is supernatural...
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Stoneskin wrote:
    > So I've decided to lavish a new gaming rig upon myself with a 'cost-no-
    > option' type of budget.
    >
    > The criteria for this build in order of importance are;
    >
    > Gaming Performance - with this in mind we'll be opting for dual 6800GT
    > cards and the Althon64 4000+ cpu coupled with 2-2-2-5 DDRRAM.
    > -
    > Silent running - A water cooled CPU, Hard disk in a sound dampening
    > enclosure and using only 1 120mm fan for blowing air into the case.
    > Note: the Shark case specified has an open grill on the side. To
    > prevent dust as much as possible I thought it may be best to vent air
    > into the front without any exhaust apart from the PSU fan. The theory
    > being that the slightly higher pressure will vent air out the side and
    > prevent dust from entering. Secondly the lack of an exhaust fan will
    > quieten the box since much of the noise generated by the PC is the
    > turbulent air coming out the back. Hopefully since the CPU is water
    > cooled, removing that heat from the inside of the case, there won't be
    > any need for further ventilation.
    > -
    > Stylish look - opting for the diNivo keyboard and an LCD monitor with
    > the silver shark case hopefully will make this PC look attractive on the
    > desktop too.
    >
    > So here's the spec, opinions and constructive criticism is greatly
    > welcomed...
    >
    > Thermaltake Shark Case (silver)
    > Thermaltake Aquarius III Water Cooling
    >
    > Asus A8N-SLI Deluxe motherboard
    > Athlon64 4000+ cpu
    > Corsair TwinX XMS3200 (2-2-2-5)
    > Asustek GeForce 6800GT (2x for SLI mode)
    > Tagan 480w quiet PSU
    >
    > Samsung SM913N 19" LCD monitor
    > Logitech diNivo Keyboard + Mouse package

    Very close to my rig:

    A64 3500+
    2x 6800GT SLI
    A8N-SLI Deluxe
    1GB Twinx-xl 3200
    TT shark case 600W psu

    Its a beast. Cooling is adequate with 1 120mm fan intake on the front
    and one on the back, coupled with the obligatory cpu/gfx card fans.
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