WD40 and MB?!

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
Will this do anything to the MB???
I feel like an idiot.
-Pete
40 answers Last reply
More about wd40
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:Rvbpe.1268$_A5.507@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    > However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    > Will this do anything to the MB???
    > I feel like an idiot.
    > -Pete
    >
    >

    hehehe.......at least you admit it. It shouldn't be a problem as it isn't
    very conductive. I would take a lint free cloth and carefully wipe it down
    as best you can. If it is any consolation, WD 40 doesn't hang around
    forever. It is a dust and dirt magnet until it finally dries up in a month
    or two. Funny though. I am looking at my shelf right now at my compressed
    air can.......guess what is sitting right next to it.......:-)

    Ed
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ed Medlin" <ed@edmedlin.com> wrote in message
    news:j3gpe.8404$mA4.3168@newssvr31.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    > "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:Rvbpe.1268$_A5.507@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    > >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    > > However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    > > Will this do anything to the MB???
    > > I feel like an idiot.
    > > -Pete
    > >
    > >
    >
    > hehehe.......at least you admit it. It shouldn't be a problem as it isn't
    > very conductive. I would take a lint free cloth and carefully wipe it down
    > as best you can. If it is any consolation, WD 40 doesn't hang around
    > forever. It is a dust and dirt magnet until it finally dries up in a month
    > or two. Funny though. I am looking at my shelf right now at my compressed
    > air can.......guess what is sitting right next to it.......:-)
    >
    > Ed
    >
    >
    All us geeks are the same....
    :-)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 06:53:37 GMT, "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com>
    wrote:

    >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >Will this do anything to the MB???
    >I feel like an idiot.
    >-Pete
    >

    It won't do immediate damage but may create a mess and fould
    contacts due to accumulation of dust. Might depend on how
    much you sprayed too.

    What "I" would do is pull the board, spray it quite
    liberally with contact cleaner after removing any fans and
    holding a piece of plastic over the CPU socket... no need to
    spray out areas that were previously covered and don't have
    WD40 in them, but leaving the CPU in while spraying the
    cleaner could actually cause some flushed-out WD40 to wick
    into the socket area, whereas with the plastic you can
    quickly remove it and blot-up any remaining solvent with a
    lint-free cloth before it dries.

    However, if the board has paper stickers on it, and if
    you're sending it to a customer, that may cosmetically
    destroy the stickers... you'll have to decide which is
    worse, you can always remove the stickers but then the
    warranty might be void.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 06:53:37 GMT, "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com> wrote:

    >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >Will this do anything to the MB???
    >I feel like an idiot.
    >-Pete
    >

    Maybe. Take the real can of compressed air, blow it off, put it in a
    sunny window for a couple days, then cross your fingers.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >Will this do anything to the MB???
    >I feel like an idiot.
    >-Pete

    You're in luck, fish oil on the mobo won't matter at all.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment?
    Am I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod
    on occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    serious question.

    DRG


    Ed Medlin wrote:
    > "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:Rvbpe.1268$_A5.507@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >>I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >>However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >>Will this do anything to the MB???
    >>I feel like an idiot.
    >>-Pete
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > hehehe.......at least you admit it. It shouldn't be a problem as it isn't
    > very conductive. I would take a lint free cloth and carefully wipe it down
    > as best you can. If it is any consolation, WD 40 doesn't hang around
    > forever. It is a dust and dirt magnet until it finally dries up in a month
    > or two. Funny though. I am looking at my shelf right now at my compressed
    > air can.......guess what is sitting right next to it.......:-)
    >
    > Ed
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Pete wrote:

    > I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    > However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    > Will this do anything to the MB???
    > I feel like an idiot.
    > -Pete
    >
    >
    Can probably just wipe most of it off. It will leave a film, but some
    100% rubbing alchohol might help to remove it. This is what is
    recommended to clean heat sinks. Spraying the CPU might ruin it. WD40
    is very filmy and likes to cling and coat and soak into metal parts.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 20:52:28 -0400, AndrewJ
    <ajpk3@hotmail.comremove> wrote:

    >
    >
    >>I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >>However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >>Will this do anything to the MB???
    >>I feel like an idiot.
    >>-Pete
    >
    >You're in luck, fish oil on the mobo won't matter at all.

    I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 23:38:30 -0500, Last Boy Scout
    <eggbtr@ezl.com> wrote:

    >Pete wrote:
    >
    >> I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    >> However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    >> Will this do anything to the MB???
    >> I feel like an idiot.
    >> -Pete
    >>
    >>
    >Can probably just wipe most of it off. It will leave a film, but some
    >100% rubbing alchohol might help to remove it. This is what is
    >recommended to clean heat sinks. Spraying the CPU might ruin it. WD40
    >is very filmy and likes to cling and coat and soak into metal parts.

    It won't ruin a CPU, I've even used WD40 to clean off
    sticker goo because some vendors <cough>Newegg</cough> like
    to put them on OEM chips. However, if you clean off the
    WD40 with something that conducts electricity, it could take
    a long drying time if it gets into the heat-spreader cavity.
    It could be damaging to use Acetone or other strong solvents
    on a CPU though.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "drg" <da@ovrclkr.com> wrote in message
    news:Ikppe.741$%j7.457@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment? Am
    > I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod on
    > occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    > serious question.
    >
    > DRG

    Actually, my office chair occaisionally starts to squeak anoyingly and I
    keep it around to stop that. I keep WD around every workspace at my home. It
    just so happens that it is sitting right next to my compressed air can on
    the shelf. I also use a lot of thumbscrews with my stainless steel case and
    a little tad on the threads helps with that too.

    Ed
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <SbBpe.12342$Oq7.11913@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>, Ed Medlin wrote:
    >
    > "drg" <da@ovrclkr.com> wrote in message
    > news:Ikppe.741$%j7.457@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment? Am
    >> I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod on
    >> occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    >> serious question.

    > Actually, my office chair occaisionally starts to squeak anoyingly and I
    > keep it around to stop that. I keep WD around every workspace at my home. It
    > just so happens that it is sitting right next to my compressed air can on
    > the shelf. I also use a lot of thumbscrews with my stainless steel case and
    > a little tad on the threads helps with that too.

    You're not the first and won't be the last - I've picked up a can of
    spraymount in place of an airduster before now. Fortunately that was on a
    laser printer mirror so after some quick thinking I cleaned it off with a
    rag soaked with some meths.

    --
    Andrew Smallshaw
    andrews@sdf.lonestar.org
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <Ikppe.741$%j7.457@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>, drg says...
    > May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment?

    Switch cleaner.


    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <ietca1l806rd2ms1veu8of40dpkgjrlh0t@4ax.com>, kony says...

    > I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    > under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
    >
    Err...oil is an insulator. Just exactly what do you think it'll do?

    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Conor wrote:
    > In article <ietca1l806rd2ms1veu8of40dpkgjrlh0t@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >
    >
    >>I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    >>under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
    >>
    >
    > Err...oil is an insulator. Just exactly what do you think it'll do?
    >

    He's concerned about whether it reacts with other compounds, like plastic,
    in things like capacitor seals, or leaching through them.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 12:07:14 GMT, "Ed Medlin"
    <ed@edmedlin.com> wrote:

    >
    >"drg" <da@ovrclkr.com> wrote in message
    >news:Ikppe.741$%j7.457@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >> May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment? Am
    >> I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod on
    >> occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    >> serious question.
    >>
    >> DRG
    >
    >Actually, my office chair occaisionally starts to squeak anoyingly and I
    >keep it around to stop that.

    That's likely why it starts squeaking again so soon- WD40 is
    not a proper lubricant, there are spray-greases that would
    work far better.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:41:38 +0100, Conor
    <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:

    >In article <ietca1l806rd2ms1veu8of40dpkgjrlh0t@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >
    >> I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    >> under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
    >>
    >Err...oil is an insulator. Just exactly what do you think it'll do?

    Damage the rubber seals allowing leakage, and foul the
    electrolyte.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:mmhea1dlrmb9l5jpuouh1chcckf55ngj5g@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 12:07:14 GMT, "Ed Medlin"
    > <ed@edmedlin.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"drg" <da@ovrclkr.com> wrote in message
    >>news:Ikppe.741$%j7.457@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    >>> May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment?
    >>> Am
    >>> I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod on
    >>> occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    >>> serious question.
    >>>
    >>> DRG
    >>
    >>Actually, my office chair occaisionally starts to squeak anoyingly and I
    >>keep it around to stop that.
    >
    > That's likely why it starts squeaking again so soon- WD40 is
    > not a proper lubricant, there are spray-greases that would
    > work far better.
    Yea, I know. but that is what I have around. It keeps it quiet for a few
    months anyway. A little disassembly and some real grease would probably do
    it for good, but who has the time.......:-) At least when my wife yells for
    me to fix the squeaky chair before it drives her nuts, I make myself seem
    useful.....:-)

    Ed
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <pphea1h0jqfg4mimjlorekh7s9qmh9bqem@4ax.com>, kony says...
    > On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:41:38 +0100, Conor
    > <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <ietca1l806rd2ms1veu8of40dpkgjrlh0t@4ax.com>, kony says...
    > >
    > >> I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    > >> under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
    > >>
    > >Err...oil is an insulator. Just exactly what do you think it'll do?
    >
    > Damage the rubber seals allowing leakage, and foul the
    > electrolyte.
    >
    Damage the rubber its designed to work with....OK.

    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 9 Jun 2005 21:10:20 +0100, Conor
    <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:

    >In article <pphea1h0jqfg4mimjlorekh7s9qmh9bqem@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >> On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 17:41:38 +0100, Conor
    >> <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <ietca1l806rd2ms1veu8of40dpkgjrlh0t@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >> >
    >> >> I'd question whether any oil at all is safe if it wicks
    >> >> under the electrolytic capacitors, gets in their seals.
    >> >>
    >> >Err...oil is an insulator. Just exactly what do you think it'll do?
    >>
    >> Damage the rubber seals allowing leakage, and foul the
    >> electrolyte.
    >>
    >Damage the rubber its designed to work with....OK.

    ??

    Show me where WD40 is spec'd as safe for use on all types of
    rubber... then show me where you can be sure all caps have
    same type of seal. WD40 is a petroleum based product and
    cannot be considered inert to all substances unless "they"
    mention otherwise.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 22:37:28 GMT, drg <da@ovrclkr.com> put finger to
    keyboard and composed:

    >May I ask why you all have WD40 near computer repair/service equipment?
    > Am I missing something in servicing computers? I've been known to mod
    >on occasion but my WD40 and cutting oil is next to the drill. This is a
    >serious question.

    WD40 = Water Displacement formula #40.

    The only place I use this stuff is on the distributor cap and spark
    plug leads, and as a rust penetrant. I keep it well away from
    electronics.


    - Franc Zabkar
    --
    Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Franc Zabkar wrote:

    > WD40 = Water Displacement formula #40.
    >
    > The only place I use this stuff is on the distributor cap and spark
    > plug leads, and as a rust penetrant. I keep it well away from
    > electronics.

    I had great success cleaning and slightly lubing my old ball controlled
    mouse with WD-40. I just let it dry overnight. [This was before optically
    controlled mice became commonplace.]
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 21:17:45 -0700, ric <nospam@home.com>
    wrote:

    >Franc Zabkar wrote:
    >
    >> WD40 = Water Displacement formula #40.
    >>
    >> The only place I use this stuff is on the distributor cap and spark
    >> plug leads, and as a rust penetrant. I keep it well away from
    >> electronics.
    >
    >I had great success cleaning and slightly lubing my old ball controlled
    >mouse with WD-40. I just let it dry overnight. [This was before optically
    >controlled mice became commonplace.]


    What need is there for WD40 in a mouse?
    The optical sensors would be better without any residue, and
    the rollers shouldn't have any WD40 in the middle, only at
    the pivotal points (ends), if even that is necessary. I
    suspect your mouse works in spite of WD40 rather than
    because of it. That is, plain 91% Alcohol should've done
    even bettern then a drop of grease on the ends of the
    rollers.

    WD40 is a water displacer. It is an inferior alternative
    for anything else, including lubing, cleaning, and freeing
    up rusted bolts/etc, or getting that old carb freed up.
    Just my opinion, it may do more passibly but not as well as
    common inexpensive alternatives.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    kony wrote:

    > >I had great success cleaning and slightly lubing my old ball controlled
    > >mouse with WD-40. I just let it dry overnight. [This was before optically
    > >controlled mice became commonplace.]
    >
    > What need is there for WD40 in a mouse?
    > The optical sensors would be better without any residue, and
    > the rollers shouldn't have any WD40 in the middle, only at
    > the pivotal points (ends), if even that is necessary.

    As I said above, it worked great for cleaning a lightly lubing my
    *old BALL CONTROLLED* mouse. No optical sensors there.

    > I suspect your mouse works in spite of WD40 rather than
    > because of it.

    The mouse is no longer in use. (I use a MX700 now.) The WD-40 treatment
    worked great in freeing up a balky mouse ball. It just had to dry well
    overnight.

    > That is, plain 91% Alcohol should've done
    > even bettern then a drop of grease on the ends of the
    > rollers.

    I never use alcohol on rubber parts. Tends to dry them out.
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    ric wrote:
    > kony wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>I had great success cleaning and slightly lubing my old ball controlled
    >>>mouse with WD-40. I just let it dry overnight. [This was before optically
    >>>controlled mice became commonplace.]
    >>
    >>What need is there for WD40 in a mouse?
    >>The optical sensors would be better without any residue, and
    >>the rollers shouldn't have any WD40 in the middle, only at
    >>the pivotal points (ends), if even that is necessary.
    >
    >
    > As I said above, it worked great for cleaning a lightly lubing my
    > *old BALL CONTROLLED* mouse. No optical sensors there.

    The typical "ball controlled" mouse has an optical encoder wheel on both of
    the shafts (X and Y) the ball turns.

    <snip>
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 22:09:15 +0100, M Pitt
    <m.o.s.h.p.i.t.t@utvinternet.ie> wrote:

    >
    >Kony my old mate. Chill out! It was a joke. Remember them?

    Could've been taken either way, though now it is clear.


    >
    >Any use of good alcohol that does not involve mixing a good strong
    >drink is a waste.
    >
    >IMNSHO

    Fair enough, but they've already ruined the rubbing alcohol
    for drinking.
  26. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 09:46:26 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> put finger to
    keyboard and composed:

    >On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 21:17:45 -0700, ric <nospam@home.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Franc Zabkar wrote:
    >>
    >>> WD40 = Water Displacement formula #40.
    >>>
    >>> The only place I use this stuff is on the distributor cap and spark
    >>> plug leads, and as a rust penetrant. I keep it well away from
    >>> electronics.
    >>
    >>I had great success cleaning and slightly lubing my old ball controlled
    >>mouse with WD-40. I just let it dry overnight. [This was before optically
    >>controlled mice became commonplace.]
    >
    >
    >What need is there for WD40 in a mouse?
    >The optical sensors would be better without any residue, and
    >the rollers shouldn't have any WD40 in the middle, only at
    >the pivotal points (ends), if even that is necessary. I
    >suspect your mouse works in spite of WD40 rather than
    >because of it. That is, plain 91% Alcohol should've done
    >even bettern then a drop of grease on the ends of the
    >rollers.
    >
    >WD40 is a water displacer. It is an inferior alternative
    >for anything else, including lubing, cleaning, and freeing
    >up rusted bolts/etc, or getting that old carb freed up.
    >Just my opinion, it may do more passibly but not as well as
    >common inexpensive alternatives.

    People have come to believe in WD40 as a magical panacea for all kinds
    of electronic ills. For this reason it has become a source of
    annoyance for technicians who have to clean out the muck before they
    can begin troubleshooting the actual fault. In one case I had to junk
    an expensive car cassette/radio because the oil had fouled absolutely
    everything, including all the rubber parts.


    - Franc Zabkar
    --
    Please remove one 's' from my address when replying by email.
  27. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 10:18:42 +0100, Conor
    <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:


    <snip>

    >What would you know?

    .... better than to go around spraying oil on everything in
    sight then cursing those who don't, apparently.
  28. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Just spray with meths, then set light to it, WD40 gone, No damage to the
    caps or CPU by the WD40.
    Don't forget to remove the battery first.

    The flames might leave them a bit frazzled though!
    :-P, lol

    Seriously though, blow the excess off with an air gun, leave in the airing
    cupboard, (or somewhere warm and dry), overnight, job done!

    Most electronic components have to withstand a solvent bath, so a little
    WD40 will do no harm.

    "Pete" <Pete@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:Rvbpe.1268$_A5.507@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    >I thought I was spraying compressed air to clean the dust off my MB.
    > However, I had accidentally picked up the can of WD40!
    > Will this do anything to the MB???
    > I feel like an idiot.
    > -Pete
    >
    >
  29. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 15:15:33 +0100, "pete"
    <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote:

    >Just spray with meths, then set light to it, WD40 gone, No damage to the
    >caps or CPU by the WD40.
    >Don't forget to remove the battery first.
    >
    >The flames might leave them a bit frazzled though!
    >:-P, lol
    >
    >Seriously though, blow the excess off with an air gun, leave in the airing
    >cupboard, (or somewhere warm and dry), overnight, job done!
    >
    >Most electronic components have to withstand a solvent bath, so a little
    >WD40 will do no harm.

    It may be true that a "little" WD40 won't do permanent harm,
    but that components withstand a _different_ solvent is no
    evidence of that. That different solvent is likely to be
    detergent too, not petroluem/oil based at all.
  30. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <b24pa1pu7h7ie1kmgq9uk8eaq0fhoiiica@4ax.com>, kony says...
    > On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 15:15:33 +0100, "pete"
    > <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Just spray with meths, then set light to it, WD40 gone, No damage to the
    > >caps or CPU by the WD40.
    > >Don't forget to remove the battery first.
    > >
    > >The flames might leave them a bit frazzled though!
    > >:-P, lol
    > >
    > >Seriously though, blow the excess off with an air gun, leave in the airing
    > >cupboard, (or somewhere warm and dry), overnight, job done!
    > >
    > >Most electronic components have to withstand a solvent bath, so a little
    > >WD40 will do no harm.
    >
    > It may be true that a "little" WD40 won't do permanent harm,
    > but that components withstand a _different_ solvent is no
    > evidence of that. That different solvent is likely to be
    > detergent too, not petroluem/oil based at all.
    >
    WD40 is not a solvent...

    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  31. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 12:39:31 +0100, Conor
    <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:

    >In article <b24pa1pu7h7ie1kmgq9uk8eaq0fhoiiica@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >> On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 15:15:33 +0100, "pete"
    >> <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Just spray with meths, then set light to it, WD40 gone, No damage to the
    >> >caps or CPU by the WD40.
    >> >Don't forget to remove the battery first.
    >> >
    >> >The flames might leave them a bit frazzled though!
    >> >:-P, lol
    >> >
    >> >Seriously though, blow the excess off with an air gun, leave in the airing
    >> >cupboard, (or somewhere warm and dry), overnight, job done!
    >> >
    >> >Most electronic components have to withstand a solvent bath, so a little
    >> >WD40 will do no harm.
    >>
    >> It may be true that a "little" WD40 won't do permanent harm,
    >> but that components withstand a _different_ solvent is no
    >> evidence of that. That different solvent is likely to be
    >> detergent too, not petroluem/oil based at all.
    >>
    >WD40 is not a solvent...

    Untrue.
    It IS "capable of dissolving another substance". In
    particular, it certainly dissolves petroleum based
    adhesives. Even on the WD40 website product page is the
    word "dissolve".
  32. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:mmuqa19dmpc35qmbi0u0cvc343nslfah4k@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 12:39:31 +0100, Conor
    > <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <b24pa1pu7h7ie1kmgq9uk8eaq0fhoiiica@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >>> On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 15:15:33 +0100, "pete"
    >>> <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >Just spray with meths, then set light to it, WD40 gone, No damage to
    >>> >the
    >>> >caps or CPU by the WD40.
    >>> >Don't forget to remove the battery first.
    >>> >
    >>> >The flames might leave them a bit frazzled though!
    >>> >:-P, lol
    >>> >
    >>> >Seriously though, blow the excess off with an air gun, leave in the
    >>> >airing
    >>> >cupboard, (or somewhere warm and dry), overnight, job done!
    >>> >
    >>> >Most electronic components have to withstand a solvent bath, so a
    >>> >little
    >>> >WD40 will do no harm.
    >>>
    >>> It may be true that a "little" WD40 won't do permanent harm,
    >>> but that components withstand a _different_ solvent is no
    >>> evidence of that. That different solvent is likely to be
    >>> detergent too, not petroluem/oil based at all.
    >>>
    >>WD40 is not a solvent...
    >
    > Untrue.
    > It IS "capable of dissolving another substance". In
    > particular, it certainly dissolves petroleum based
    > adhesives. Even on the WD40 website product page is the
    > word "dissolve".

    Further words on the subject from WD40.
    WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without
    damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment, and
    vehicles. Use it to remove splattered bugs from the front of cars. WD-40
    will even help remove gum from carpet. Just spray, wait, and wipe with a
    clean cloth.
  33. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    old jon wrote:

    > Further words on the subject from WD40.
    > WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without
    > damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment, and
    > vehicles.

    And mouse balls. <g>
  34. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <mmuqa19dmpc35qmbi0u0cvc343nslfah4k@4ax.com>, kony says...

    > >WD40 is not a solvent...
    >
    > Untrue.

    I love pedants. They make themselves look so stupid so many times and
    somehow I still never get tired of it.


    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  35. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 15:04:29 +0100, Conor
    <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:

    >In article <mmuqa19dmpc35qmbi0u0cvc343nslfah4k@4ax.com>, kony says...
    >
    >> >WD40 is not a solvent...
    >>
    >> Untrue.
    >
    >I love pedants. They make themselves look so stupid so many times and
    >somehow I still never get tired of it.

    I suppose in your alternate reality a solvent means
    something else?
  36. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <hkara19pfupub7r1hdp00if9857vfrpgsq@4ax.com>, kony says...
    > On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 15:04:29 +0100, Conor
    > <conor.turton@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <mmuqa19dmpc35qmbi0u0cvc343nslfah4k@4ax.com>, kony says...
    > >
    > >> >WD40 is not a solvent...
    > >>
    > >> Untrue.
    > >
    > >I love pedants. They make themselves look so stupid so many times and
    > >somehow I still never get tired of it.
    >
    > I suppose in your alternate reality a solvent means
    > something else?
    >
    THere's dedicated and "side effect when applied to a very small list of
    materials"
    --
    Conor


    "Be incomprehensible. If they can't understand, they can't disagree"
  37. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    "Conor" wrpte"
    > kony says...
    > > Conor wrote:
    > > > kony says...
    > > >
    > > >> >WD40 is not a solvent...
    > > >>
    > > >> Untrue.
    > > >
    > > >I love pedants. They make themselves look so stupid so many times and
    > > >somehow I still never get tired of it.
    > >
    > > I suppose in your alternate reality a solvent means
    > > something else?
    > >
    > THere's dedicated and "side effect when applied to a very small list of
    > materials"

    Sorry, Conor, but Kony is correct. A solvent is a substance which dissolves
    another substance (the solute). Water can be a solvent, as can any number
    of other substances, including WD-40.

    Jon
  38. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    Poor mouse, I don't think I would like to have WD40 sprayed on my balls!,
    lol

    Or is that a pc mouse?, NOOOO don't answer, I read the posts. :-P

    I never said that WD40 was a solvent.
    I know that WD40 is not a solvent, but is a lot less harsh, than solvent.
    The plastics and rubbers, used in electronic components, have to withstand
    solvents and high temperatures, (solder baths, for example), so I can not
    see, a bit of WD40 causing any harm.
    Maybe if someone can supply scientific proof, I may be persuaded otherwise.


    "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote in message news:42ADD7BC.5432E6CC@home.com...
    > old jon wrote:
    >
    >> Further words on the subject from WD40.
    >> WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without
    >> damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment,
    >> and
    >> vehicles.
    >
    > And mouse balls. <g>
  39. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    BTW, the solvent I am talking about, is the type they use in ultrasonic
    cleaning baths, for cleaning off the solder flux, (water, if u class this as
    a solvent), would be of no use in this application.


    "pete" <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote in message
    news:d8kqpk$e6l$1@news.freedom2surf.net...
    > Poor mouse, I don't think I would like to have WD40 sprayed on my balls!,
    > lol
    >
    > Or is that a pc mouse?, NOOOO don't answer, I read the posts. :-P
    >
    > I never said that WD40 was a solvent.
    > I know that WD40 is not a solvent, but is a lot less harsh, than solvent.
    > The plastics and rubbers, used in electronic components, have to withstand
    > solvents and high temperatures, (solder baths, for example), so I can not
    > see, a bit of WD40 causing any harm.
    > Maybe if someone can supply scientific proof, I may be persuaded
    > otherwise.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote in message
    > news:42ADD7BC.5432E6CC@home.com...
    >> old jon wrote:
    >>
    >>> Further words on the subject from WD40.
    >>> WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without
    >>> damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment,
    >>> and
    >>> vehicles.
    >>
    >> And mouse balls. <g>
    >
    >
  40. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt (More info?)

    On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 23:15:55 +0100, "pete"
    <petefa@petefa.f2s.com> wrote:

    >BTW, the solvent I am talking about, is the type they use in ultrasonic
    >cleaning baths, for cleaning off the solder flux, (water, if u class this as
    >a solvent), would be of no use in this application.
    >
    >

    Parts are typically cleaned in a detergent solution.

    Likewise, that would be useful for cleaning a mouse... but
    it has to dry thoroughly- if you don't have a precision oven
    to limit temp, regular air-drying takes a lot longer.
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