Make your own anti-static wristwrap

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Anyone done this?
26 answers Last reply
More about make anti static wristwrap
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Anyone done this?

    When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a wood
    floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I was inserting a
    component. No problems.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:27:00 GMT Letting slip the dogs of war "TC"
    <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote :

    >Anyone done this?

    I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I just attach a
    wire to it and to a metal part of the case of the PC but leave the
    power in the PC but switched off at the wall(UK outlets have switches)
    or if the PC power supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    the earth strap.
    HTH :)


    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
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  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Shep©" <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:27:00 GMT Letting slip the dogs of war "TC"
    > <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote :
    >
    > >Anyone done this?
    >
    > I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I just attach a
    > wire to it and to a metal part of the case of the PC but leave the
    > power in the PC but switched off at the wall(UK outlets have switches)
    > or if the PC power supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    > the earth strap.
    > HTH :)
    You need an isolation resistor in series with the ground strap. Never ground
    your body directly to ground.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com>...

    > I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I
    > just attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case
    > of the PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off
    > at the wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power
    > supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    > the earth strap.

    Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall outlet when
    you work on your computer. You never want a direct connection to
    earth ground because if you somehow come into contact with high
    voltage at the same time, a high level of current could flow through
    your body, possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have at least 1
    megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do all commercial
    anti-static wrist straps.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    My method may have been totally cave-man, but it was the right price! I just
    connected a 24 gauge phone wire to my house's earth ground and wrapped the
    other end around the lamp on my worktable (wood). I wore rubber soled hiking
    boots, but I doubt very much that made any difference. Every time I sat down
    to do anything after moving around I grabbed the bare end of the wire and
    every time I discharged. I didn't fry anything so I guess it worked, or I am
    just lucky.
    I wore the latex gloves once a long time ago to do something in the box and
    they just kept getting caught on things.

    There's your straight line again Shep!

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Anyone done this?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    BigSiphonHose wrote:

    >
    > "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > > Anyone done this?
    >
    > When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a
    > wood floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I was
    > inserting a component. No problems.

    I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    If you're wearing a metallic wristwatch, just connect it to your PC through
    1 MOhm 1/2 Watt.
    If not, you can use one or your earrings or anything else (o@^@o) !!!

    In case you're charged with static electricity and you touch an integrated
    circuit, the discharge current will be bery low through the IC's input
    protective diodes. They'll not be destroyed and your body will be slowly
    discharged without any danger for the other components. That's better than a
    simple wire and lotta more secure than discharging your body touching the PC
    frame prior to handling sensitive components.

    Note also that if you have to take metallized bags, and due to the fact you
    don't have a dissipative plan (conductive rubber sheet connected to the
    earth ground) put them in contact with the PC chassis before opening.
    They'll acquire the same potential reducing the risks.

    Don't underestimate the importance of these precautions. My son killed a CPU
    although standing on a conductive floor (tiles).

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message news:
    UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Anyone done this?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > In case you're charged with static electricity and you touch an integrated
    > circuit, the discharge current will be bery low through the IC's input
    > protective diodes. They'll not be destroyed and your body will be slowly
    > discharged without any danger for the other components.
    A+ third edition: Humans can accumulate electrical potentials well over
    25,000 volts. Although we might experience a shock or other sensation when
    the charge dissipates, it is a very quick, low-current flow that is not
    harmful. But as little as 30 volts can destroy some of today's more
    sophisticated integrated chips, so daily activities can generate static
    charges on your body that are potentially harmful to sensitive electronics
    components.
    Consider the following:
    Walking across carpet: 1,500 to 25,000 volts
    Walking over an untreated vinyl floor: 250 to 12,000 volts
    Picking up a common plastic bag: 1,200 to 20,000 volts
    Working at a bench: 700 to 6,000 volts
    Handling a vinyl envelope: 600 to 7,000 volts

    Now by that I would have to say that it could very much harm a component
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 6 Apr 2004 15:58:33 -0500 Letting slip the dogs of war "Patch"
    <bob_acord@hotmail.com> wrote :

    >
    >"Shep©" <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message
    >news:g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com...
    >> On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:27:00 GMT Letting slip the dogs of war "TC"
    >> <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote :
    >>
    >> >Anyone done this?
    >>
    >> I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I just attach a
    >> wire to it and to a metal part of the case of the PC but leave the
    >> power in the PC but switched off at the wall(UK outlets have switches)
    >> or if the PC power supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    >> the earth strap.
    >> HTH :)
    >You need an isolation resistor in series with the ground strap. Never ground
    >your body directly to ground.
    >
    Why?I love the buzz :D Even UK 50 Hz mains ain't even a good kick to
    me ;-)


    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    email shepATpartyheld.de
    Free songs to download and,"BURN" :O)
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 21:19:42 GMT Letting slip the dogs of war "TC"
    <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote :

    >BigSiphonHose wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    >> > Anyone done this?
    >>
    >> When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a
    >> wood floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I was
    >> inserting a component. No problems.
    >
    >I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?

    Yes.But this is a computer group,not a sexual confession forum :D


    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    email shepATpartyheld.de
    Free songs to download and,"BURN" :O)
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 6 Apr 2004 17:13:10 -0700 Letting slip the dogs of war
    do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me) wrote :

    >Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com>...
    >
    >> I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I
    >> just attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case
    >> of the PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off
    >> at the wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power
    >> supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    >> the earth strap.
    >
    >Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall outlet when
    >you work on your computer. You never want a direct connection to
    >earth ground because if you somehow come into contact with high
    >voltage at the same time, a high level of current could flow through
    >your body, possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    >heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have at least 1
    >megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do all commercial
    >anti-static wrist straps.

    How very silly and a complete misunderstanding of electrical
    conductivity :/


    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    email shepATpartyheld.de
    Free songs to download and,"BURN" :O)
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Shep) wrote:

    > On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 21:19:42 GMT Letting slip the dogs of war "TC"
    > <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote :
    >
    > > BigSiphonHose wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > >> > Anyone done this?
    > >>
    > >> When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a
    > >> wood floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I
    > was >> inserting a component. No problems.
    > >
    > > I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should
    > > work?
    >
    > Yes.But this is a computer group,not a sexual confession forum :D

    That was a good laugh! Thanks! I sometimes mix the groups I'm in LOL.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Ah, no. :(

    It will actually make it worse. The rubber gloves, being an insulator,
    will allow all static charges to accumulate on its outer surface.

    TC wrote:
    >
    > I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Anyone done this?
    >


    Mine's so simple it's unbelievable!

    Leave the computer *plugged in* while you're working on it.

    *Always* touch the case before touching any innards. This will effectively
    discharge any static.

    This *will not* work unless the computer is plugged in, as otherwise there
    would be no ground.

    I've never damaged a component, and I've even done minor work on carpet
    safely this way.

    TFM®
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    That may work until you brush up against something with your arm, at which
    point the spark will jump.

    Personally, I take "reasonable" precautions. and have yet to have a part
    failure due to static. My precautions consist of:
    1) Don't run around like a manic, shuffling my feet on new carpet while
    carrying my new processor.
    2) Touch the metal case prior to disconnecting the power cable from the
    PSU.
    3) Try to touch a component of the case prior to touching the "sensitive
    bits" like memory and processors after walking away from the computer.

    Clint


    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:O9Fcc.417740$jH.6159505@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > BigSiphonHose wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > > > Anyone done this?
    > >
    > > When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a
    > > wood floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I was
    > > inserting a component. No problems.
    >
    > I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<clj670104mhtcieasq5v9drdd975bccfgv@4ax.com>...

    >I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I just
    >attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case of the
    >PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off at the
    >wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power supply
    >has an isolator switch,turn that off and use the earth strap.
    >
    >>Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall
    >>outlet when you work on your computer. You never want a
    >>direct connection to earth ground because if you somehow
    >>come into contact with high voltage at the same time, a
    >>high level of current could flow through your body,
    >>possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    >>heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have
    >>at least 1 megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do
    >>all commercial anti-static wrist straps.
    >
    >How very silly and a complete misunderstanding of electrical
    >conductivity :/

    Your misunderstanding of electricity is possibly dangerous. People
    should not be directly earth grounded, for the reason I gave above,
    and anti-static wrist straps must never provide a direct,
    low-impedance eath ground.

    There are factories where workers are required to plug their
    anti-static wrist straps into a tester before they're allowed entry,
    and the tester will not pass them if the impedance is less than 1
    megaohm or greater than 2 megaohms. Look in the back chapters of an
    IC data book from TI, and you'll see similar guidelines for static
    dissipation -- they recommend 1M resistance for all anti-static ground
    connections, never any direct earth grounds.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<O9Fcc.417740$jH.6159505@twister.tampabay.rr.com>...

    > I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?

    You have to make sure that the rubber gloves themselves won't generate
    static. The only common rubber that may be anti-static is black,
    because of the carbon black (carbon powder) in it, but usually not.

    You'll be better off getting a real anti-static wrist strap from Fry's
    or Radio Shack, but don't connect yourself directly to earth ground
    through a piece of wire because that can be hazardous if you somehow
    come in contact with high voltage. In fact there's no need for an
    earth ground at all when assembling a computer because the computer
    equipment doesn't care about the voltage relative to earth ground,
    only relative to its own ground, so you want to touch each device's
    ground to the computer chassis before handling it. The easiest way to
    keep everything at the same potential as the computer chassis is by
    doing all your work on an anti-static surface, such as pink bubble
    wrap or pink foam wrap, and working in short sleeves (elbows will
    naturally ground frequently to the pink surface frequently). Working
    without shoes or socks also helps.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "TFM®" <horndawg@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message news:<mbQcc.390712$B81.6207844@twister.tampabay.rr.com>...

    > Mine's so simple it's unbelievable!
    >
    > Leave the computer *plugged in* while you're working on it.

    NO! You don't want a direct earth ground while working on the
    computer because of the shock hazard if you happen to touch high
    voltage. Also some power supplies don't have a switch on back to
    allow 100% turn-off, meaning parts of the computer will still be
    powered (but the switch on a powr strip will remove all power).

    > *Always* touch the case before touching any innards. This will effectively
    > discharge any static.

    True.

    > This *will not* work unless the computer is plugged in, as otherwise there
    > would be no ground.

    False. It will still work fine because for anti-static purposes what
    matters is the voltage between you and the computer ground, not
    between you and the earth ground.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    You buy a computer power cord the on the wall socket side take off the two
    prongs leaving the ground then you plug the ground into the wall. Then you
    plug the comp. power end to the PSU. that grounds you comp.

    --
    "Duct tape is a lot like the Force. It has a Dark side, a Light side, and it
    holds all the pieces of the Universe together"
    "do_not_spam_me" <do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com> wrote in message
    news:101710fa.0404061613.13ccc812@posting.google.com...
    > Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:<g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com>...
    >
    > > I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I
    > > just attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case
    > > of the PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off
    > > at the wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power
    > > supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    > > the earth strap.
    >
    > Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall outlet when
    > you work on your computer. You never want a direct connection to
    > earth ground because if you somehow come into contact with high
    > voltage at the same time, a high level of current could flow through
    > your body, possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    > heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have at least 1
    > megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do all commercial
    > anti-static wrist straps.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    No

    "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message news:
    O9Fcc.417740$jH.6159505@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > BigSiphonHose wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    > > > Anyone done this?
    > >
    > > When I put together my first build a few months ago, I worked on a
    > > wood floor, bare footed, and kept one hand on the case whenever I was
    > > inserting a component. No problems.
    >
    > I plan to wear rubber (surgical) gloves. I believe this should work?
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Keep the computer connected to the earth ground. Without 1 MOhm resistor
    Either use a bipolar switch, opening BOTH wires connected to the mains
    outlet, but keeping the ground connected
    Or unplug the cord and connect the chassis to the ground with a wire and two
    alligator clamps.

    Connect yourself with a wristwatch to the computer case through 1 MOhm

    This is very important also: Avoid all kind of insulation between the
    computer and you. Use dissipative materials instead (conductive but with a
    high resistivity). Wood isn't good as well as plastic soils or carpet. For
    the floor, tiles are good, concrete as well, preferably the table shall also
    be covered with dissipative material (conductive rubber).
    In case you can't have dissipative material to cover the table, this isn't a
    big problem as far as everything is grounded or discharged prior to opening
    and handling.


    "do_not_spam_me" <do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com> a écrit dans le message news:
    101710fa.0404061613.13ccc812@posting.google.com...
    > Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:<g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com>...
    >
    > > I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I
    > > just attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case
    > > of the PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off
    > > at the wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power
    > > supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    > > the earth strap.
    >
    > Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall outlet when
    > you work on your computer. You never want a direct connection to
    > earth ground because if you somehow come into contact with high
    > voltage at the same time, a high level of current could flow through
    > your body, possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    > heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have at least 1
    > megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do all commercial
    > anti-static wrist straps.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 07 Apr 2004 09:52:18 GMT, "TFM®" <horndawg@tampabay.rr.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"TC" <metrotex30@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:UDCcc.389697$B81.6120245@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
    >> Anyone done this?
    >>
    >
    >
    >Mine's so simple it's unbelievable!
    >
    >Leave the computer *plugged in* while you're working on it.
    >
    >*Always* touch the case before touching any innards. This will effectively
    >discharge any static.
    >
    >This *will not* work unless the computer is plugged in, as otherwise there
    >would be no ground.
    >
    >I've never damaged a component, and I've even done minor work on carpet
    >safely this way.
    >
    >TFM®
    >

    You can make a static strap out of an old twist-o-flex watch strap, a
    few feet of 18gauge wire and a small alligator clip.
    A length of velcro will work for the wrist strap as well.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Aldo Larrabiata" <zzz@zorglub.net> wrote in message news:<c51to8$q3t$1@news-reader5.wanadoo.fr>...

    > Keep the computer connected to the earth ground.
    > Without 1 MOhm resistor Either use a bipolar switch,
    > opening BOTH wires connected to the mains outlet,
    > but keeping the ground connected Or unplug the
    > cord and connect the chassis to the ground with a
    > wire and two alligator clamps.
    >
    > Connect yourself with a wristwatch to the computer
    > case through 1 MOhm

    This is wrong because it's virtually impossible to maintain 1M of
    resistance between the person and the computer case, and with a direct
    earth ground connection to the computer, there will be times when the
    resistance between the person and earth ground, an undesireable
    condition. If any earth ground connection is to be made at all with
    the computer, it should have 1M of resistance in series with it.

    Also in the U.S., bipolar switches are not universally used for AC
    power. Wall switches and power strip switches are rarely bipolar
    here, and many computer power supplies have only single-pole switches.

    > This is very important also: Avoid all kind of insulation between the
    > computer and you. Use dissipative materials instead (conductive but with a
    > high resistivity). Wood isn't good as well as plastic soils or carpet. For
    > the floor, tiles are good, concrete as well, preferably the table shall also
    > be covered with dissipative material (conductive rubber).
    > In case you can't have dissipative material to cover the table, this isn't a
    > big problem as far as everything is grounded or discharged prior to opening
    > and handling.
  24. Ok... Just using anti static bags as gauntlets work?
    I think is simple as that, or not? (If it doesn't work, i've lost my motherboard and RAM today)
  25. Anonymous said:
    Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Shep© <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<g9v570pc4042vg1qiktk72n7aalbi6ga27@4ax.com>...

    > I sometimes wear a copper braclet.If I want earthing I
    > just attach a wire to it and to a metal part of the case
    > of the PC but leave the power in the PC but switched off
    > at the wall(UK outlets have switches) or if the PC power
    > supply has an isolator switch,turn that off and use
    > the earth strap.

    Stop doing that, and unplug the power cord from the wall outlet when
    you work on your computer. You never want a direct connection to
    earth ground because if you somehow come into contact with high
    voltage at the same time, a high level of current could flow through
    your body, possibly even through your diaphram (breathing stops) or
    heart (life stops). Any ground connection should have at least 1
    megaohm of resistance in series with it, as do all commercial
    anti-static wrist straps.


    By the instructions for antistatic wrist straps you are earthing to the chassis, so it is the earth of the electronic circuitry, not the mains electricity earth. Yes they are the same if the computer is plugged in, but if you remove the power cord, they are not the same thing. Standing on the floor you are earthed anyway , the resistance to earth isn't 0, but you are conected to earth. A plastic mat puts you above earth. You can built up a static charge even if you are earthed, unless you are directly earthed a 0ohms. So the idea is to discharge the static to the earth of the cicuitry, in general the chassis via a small load resistance. 1 mega ohm will also dampen the static and help save the pc.

    Yes the power cord should be out of the wall socket, I take it out of the PC as well. Never underestimate that someone will plug it in for you when you don't want them to. Always remember Murphy's Law and O'Toole' s law, which states Murphy was an optimist.

    Now Lets get something straight here about household AC current, a 1 megaohm resistance to earth will not stop you getting electrocuted. It will lower the current going through you by such a small amount it will not make any difference. Of course if you touch an active or neutral wire that is live and you are grounded, which you effectivly are unless you are on a rubber mat etc, you will have the current flow through you to ground.
    Now the good news is you should have an earth leakage switch in your fusebox, usually called a safety switch. This cuts the power so fast that it saves you. If you do not have one, get one installed asap. If you do have one check to see if it is on power and light. Originally they were installed on power only, but now it is done on both. If it is on power only; you can still get electrocuted to earth if you touch a live wire (active or neutral in the light circuits.

    BTW a safety swith does not help you if you above earth and touch active and neutral together. Even if you are earthed and touch active and neutral at the exactly same time, zap.
  26. zoteman94 said:
    Ok... Just using anti static bags as gauntlets work?
    I think is simple as that, or not? (If it doesn't work, i've lost my motherboard and RAM today)


    Even if they don't work it doesn't mean you lost them. It is a matter of fact that no anti staic protection will kill components in all cases. Static will cause an issue, but it isn't always present or gets discharged to earth via other paths. Using anti static is insurance against the time it is a problem, because the cost of the static discharge can be so high.
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