First Build, Power?, Cooling?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Intel P42.8Ghz (prescott)- retail
ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe
Seagate ATA 120GB 7200RPM
ATI Radeon 9200 ($69 on newegg)
Corsair XMS 1GB(512MBx2) DDR PC-3200

1. Is this a balanced config.? I am not a gamer, but I am looking for
a totally decent and capable box.
2. How much power will I need to run the above config.?
3. I hear that the 'prescott' core runs hot, do I need a post
manufacture HSF? Or will the stock do just fine? What about case fans,
I see some people who say they have 8 and even 10, this seems excessive?
Also I have no need to OC but I want to do it, just to learn how--
nothing excessive, strictly as a learning experience. What cooling
considerations should I take into account?
4. Finally, how important is the case design? Airflow? Aluminum or
steel? etc...? In other words, what is the functional difference
between a $20 case and a $200 case?

Thanks in advance for the info.
3 answers Last reply
More about first build power cooling
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <Xns94CFBDF0DA001561677@68.1.17.6>,
    Muammar@Lybia.gov says...
    > Intel P42.8Ghz (prescott)- retail
    > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe
    > Seagate ATA 120GB 7200RPM
    > ATI Radeon 9200 ($69 on newegg)
    > Corsair XMS 1GB(512MBx2) DDR PC-3200
    >
    > 1. Is this a balanced config.? I am not a gamer, but I am looking for
    > a totally decent and capable box.

    Them's the basics... you should buy from a store that
    also stocks OEM WinXP Pro (usually $135 or so). I know
    MWave.com does, possibly Comp4Sure or NewEgg.

    > 2. How much power will I need to run the above config.?

    400W? (big SWAG), get a good quality quiet power-supply
    and you won't have as many worries.

    > 3. I hear that the 'prescott' core runs hot, do I need a post
    > manufacture HSF? Or will the stock do just fine? What about case fans,
    > I see some people who say they have 8 and even 10, this seems excessive?
    > Also I have no need to OC but I want to do it, just to learn how--
    > nothing excessive, strictly as a learning experience. What cooling
    > considerations should I take into account?
    > 4. Finally, how important is the case design? Airflow? Aluminum or
    > steel? etc...? In other words, what is the functional difference
    > between a $20 case and a $200 case?
    >

    A good case will have lots of room for expansion,
    designed for airflow and/or quiet operation, be built
    out of thicker steel/aluminum, and will basically last
    through a good amount of abuse. (My current fav case is
    the Antec p160, for instance.)
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    As another poster suggested, I'd also go for the C processor because
    prescott runs too hot IMO.

    Despite the fact that you will only be using about 170 watts power, I'd
    start at 300 watt, 400 is overkill, but if it makes you feel better, go
    ahead and spend the extra money. I highly recommend Fortron Source.

    As for CPU cooling, the retail boxed (3 year warranty) 3.0Cs will have a
    better heatsink that is made using aluminum + copper base and fins. It
    is heavy and has a nice quality feel to it (the 3.2Cs use copper too,
    but aluminum fins, also very nice).

    Don't bother with aftermarket coolers, the Intel coolers, even the
    cheapest ones are usually very good. Only go aftermarket when doing
    extreme overclocking. The 2.8c's don't use copper. It's possible that
    the 3.0Cs may start to use the cheaper heatsinks, so watch out. I'd go
    with a 3.0C instead of the 2.8 and save by buying a good 300/350 watt PS
    instead of a 400 watt.

    Case cooling: there is usually not a big difference when it comes to
    airflow. One fan in the front, and one in the back should be more than
    adequate for what you're using. I recommend these fans because you can
    spin them as fast as you need and are quiet regardless of speed:

    http://www.directron.com/uc8fab.html

    However, they do not accurately report their RPMS at about 1900 RPMS or
    lower, which can even cause problems with certain motherboards. The
    solution is to not connect them to the motherboard fan headers, instead,
    use the standard connectors from the PS.

    Prices on cases do not always reflect quality. But do expect to pay at
    around $50 for a good case with out a power supply.


    Muammar wrote:

    > Intel P42.8Ghz (prescott)- retail ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe Seagate ATA
    > 120GB 7200RPM ATI Radeon 9200 ($69 on newegg) Corsair XMS
    > 1GB(512MBx2) DDR PC-3200
    >
    > 1. Is this a balanced config.? I am not a gamer, but I am looking
    > for a totally decent and capable box. 2. How much power will I need
    > to run the above config.? 3. I hear that the 'prescott' core runs
    > hot, do I need a post manufacture HSF? Or will the stock do just
    > fine? What about case fans, I see some people who say they have 8 and
    > even 10, this seems excessive? Also I have no need to OC but I want
    > to do it, just to learn how-- nothing excessive, strictly as a
    > learning experience. What cooling considerations should I take into
    > account? 4. Finally, how important is the case design? Airflow?
    > Aluminum or steel? etc...? In other words, what is the functional
    > difference between a $20 case and a $200 case?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for the info.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Hi "Muammar",
    Everything looks fine EXCEPT the 2.8 GHz Prescott. It'll run hotter and
    have worse performance than the 2.8C (800 MHz FSB non-Prescott.) If you're
    hell bent to go for a Prescott, you should go above 3 GHz, but frankly, the
    best price/performance ratio right now for a Pentium 4 is the 2.8C. If
    you're not a hardcore gamer, just use the retail Intel heatsink/fan combo
    that comes with the CPU. Intel's maximum spec for the weight of a heatsink
    is 450 grams, and most after-market ones are almost twice that. The Intel
    fan/heatsink is actually pretty good, and you'll lose the CPU 3 year
    warranty if you don't decide to use it.

    These days, you should plan for the future, so although a good 300W PSU may
    be OK for your current components, why not get a decent 430W or higher PSU
    from a respectable manufacturer like Antec or Enermax? A decent intake fan
    in the lower front of the case and an exhaust fan in the upper rear near the
    CPU should be fine, unless you're planning on running RAID 5 with 4 Raptor
    drives and dual DVD burners. I'd get ball-bearing 120mm fans for longer
    life and less noise if you have a choice, and if you end up getting a cheap
    case, definitely don't use the piece of $%^# power supply that'll likely
    accompany it.

    Despite all the hype regarding better cooling with an aluminum case opposed
    to steel, the main benefit of an aluminum case would be that it wouldn't be
    as heavy, perhaps half the weight of a similar steel case. Everyone has
    their own idea of what their ideal case would have, but if you're going for
    a tower/mid-tower, you should be sure that it can handle upgrades down the
    line with ease (enough drive bays.) Removable motherboard trays are nice
    for the initial installation, and thumbscrews and rolled edges are always
    convenient. You can find perfectly decent cases for around $40. Just get
    one that appeals to you aesthetically, has the extras that are important to
    you, and has enough interior space and unrestrictive air inlet/output areas
    to keep things cool. Some of the extremely high-end cases are overpriced,
    and you're paying for a premium finish more than anything else. A good
    mid-range manufacturer to check out is Kingwin. Their KT-424 series
    aluminum cases are excellent, and can be had for around $85. A lot of folks
    like the Antec Sonata, and it already comes with a decent and quiet power
    supply and a 120mm exhaust fan at around $110.

    Russell
    http://tastycomputers.com

    "Muammar" <Muammar@Lybia.gov> wrote in message
    news:Xns94CFBDF0DA001561677@68.1.17.6...
    > Intel P42.8Ghz (prescott)- retail
    > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe
    > Seagate ATA 120GB 7200RPM
    > ATI Radeon 9200 ($69 on newegg)
    > Corsair XMS 1GB(512MBx2) DDR PC-3200
    >
    > 1. Is this a balanced config.? I am not a gamer, but I am looking for
    > a totally decent and capable box.
    > 2. How much power will I need to run the above config.?
    > 3. I hear that the 'prescott' core runs hot, do I need a post
    > manufacture HSF? Or will the stock do just fine? What about case fans,
    > I see some people who say they have 8 and even 10, this seems excessive?
    > Also I have no need to OC but I want to do it, just to learn how--
    > nothing excessive, strictly as a learning experience. What cooling
    > considerations should I take into account?
    > 4. Finally, how important is the case design? Airflow? Aluminum or
    > steel? etc...? In other words, what is the functional difference
    > between a $20 case and a $200 case?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for the info.
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