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802.11g WLAN performance - HELP!

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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Anonymous
June 26, 2005 4:43:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I have a very simple wireless home LAN:
2 x XP SP2 PCs with 802.11g PCI adaptors (Mecer WPG2400) set to AUTO detect
speed, connections ("good" to "excellent")
1 x 802.11g AP (Mecer ARM904) connected via ethernet (cable) to ADSL router
and WAN
Network is connected and working
BUT: throughput transferring file from PC to PC is +- 5mbps - my
understanding is that I should be able to obtain 20-30mbps, depeding on
conditions.

Q1: should I expect better performance? If so, how do I home in on
bottlenecks?
Q2: when I connect to the network, I get a warning "network does not support
turbo mode", although all the components in the network do. How can I enable
turbo mode?
Q3: pointers to the relevant registry entries, registry key descriptions and
suggested values/tweaks would be vey helpful!

Sorry for the long-winded post, but I'm sure that there are lots out there
that could benefit from some expert advice on what appears to be quite a
common WLAN problem!
June 26, 2005 3:35:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi
Regular 802.11g should provide a bandwidth of 16-22Mb/sec. at a very close
proximity.

Once you move the client from the Access Point (Wireless Router) it is
highly envioroment depended and every thing is a "fair game".

"Speed" (Bandwidth) expectation of Ethernet Home Networks using Windows
98/2000/XP. - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html

Turbo mode is propriety setting and depends on the specific chipset that is
used by the manufacturer. Your original hardware manual, and or the Brand
support might help solve the issue.

If you experience distance problem these pages might help.

Extending Distance: - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html

Hi Gain Antenna for Entry Level Wireless -
http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html

Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html

The most common "Trick" (and might be the only "Tweak" concerning
performance) is Optimization of the TCP/IP stack.

Optimizing the TCP/IP Stack - http://www.ezlan.net/Internet_Speed.html

Jack (MVP-Networking).





"sunbird" <sunbird@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:31F4AA05-BAB7-4BE1-B472-70D7DE517CDF@microsoft.com...
> I have a very simple wireless home LAN:
> 2 x XP SP2 PCs with 802.11g PCI adaptors (Mecer WPG2400) set to AUTO
detect
> speed, connections ("good" to "excellent")
> 1 x 802.11g AP (Mecer ARM904) connected via ethernet (cable) to ADSL
router
> and WAN
> Network is connected and working
> BUT: throughput transferring file from PC to PC is +- 5mbps - my
> understanding is that I should be able to obtain 20-30mbps, depeding on
> conditions.
>
> Q1: should I expect better performance? If so, how do I home in on
> bottlenecks?
> Q2: when I connect to the network, I get a warning "network does not
support
> turbo mode", although all the components in the network do. How can I
enable
> turbo mode?
> Q3: pointers to the relevant registry entries, registry key descriptions
and
> suggested values/tweaks would be vey helpful!
>
> Sorry for the long-winded post, but I'm sure that there are lots out there
> that could benefit from some expert advice on what appears to be quite a
> common WLAN problem!
>
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 4:56:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

thanks so far. Here's an update: I connected a 3rd computer via an ethernet
CABLE to the AP to test each wireless connection separately. Both computers
TRANSMIT at a consistent 21-22mbps to the test PC, as expected. BUT both
computer RECEIVE from the test machine at around 5mbps and judging from the
netmeter graph, it looks as though the connection speed varies widely during
the transfer. I would have expected both TX and RX rates to be the same, but
this is not the case.

Any suggestions??


"Jack" wrote:

> Hi
> Regular 802.11g should provide a bandwidth of 16-22Mb/sec. at a very close
> proximity.
>
> Once you move the client from the Access Point (Wireless Router) it is
> highly envioroment depended and every thing is a "fair game".
>
> "Speed" (Bandwidth) expectation of Ethernet Home Networks using Windows
> 98/2000/XP. - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
>
> Turbo mode is propriety setting and depends on the specific chipset that is
> used by the manufacturer. Your original hardware manual, and or the Brand
> support might help solve the issue.
>
> If you experience distance problem these pages might help.
>
> Extending Distance: - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
>
> Hi Gain Antenna for Entry Level Wireless -
> http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
>
> Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
>
> The most common "Trick" (and might be the only "Tweak" concerning
> performance) is Optimization of the TCP/IP stack.
>
> Optimizing the TCP/IP Stack - http://www.ezlan.net/Internet_Speed.html
>
> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>
>
>
>
>
> "sunbird" <sunbird@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:31F4AA05-BAB7-4BE1-B472-70D7DE517CDF@microsoft.com...
> > I have a very simple wireless home LAN:
> > 2 x XP SP2 PCs with 802.11g PCI adaptors (Mecer WPG2400) set to AUTO
> detect
> > speed, connections ("good" to "excellent")
> > 1 x 802.11g AP (Mecer ARM904) connected via ethernet (cable) to ADSL
> router
> > and WAN
> > Network is connected and working
> > BUT: throughput transferring file from PC to PC is +- 5mbps - my
> > understanding is that I should be able to obtain 20-30mbps, depeding on
> > conditions.
> >
> > Q1: should I expect better performance? If so, how do I home in on
> > bottlenecks?
> > Q2: when I connect to the network, I get a warning "network does not
> support
> > turbo mode", although all the components in the network do. How can I
> enable
> > turbo mode?
> > Q3: pointers to the relevant registry entries, registry key descriptions
> and
> > suggested values/tweaks would be vey helpful!
> >
> > Sorry for the long-winded post, but I'm sure that there are lots out there
> > that could benefit from some expert advice on what appears to be quite a
> > common WLAN problem!
> >
>
>
>
!