Building a new system

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Need some advice on building a new system. I have some components
that will simply be moved into it, and I have a budget of about $700
dollars to spend. I will run games on this machine, but for the most
part, I will be using it to develop applications and run Oracle Financials
for training purposes. My current PC is going in the living room to
run emulators. I've just started some research on the differences
between the new P4 and AMD chips, both 32 and 64 bit models, but
there's so little software out there that's truly 64 bit nowadays that
it seems to be inconclusive. I will need at least 1 GB of RAM on the
new machine due to the size of the applications I'll be running.

Here's what I already have:

2 Maxtor 7200 rpm 80 gig HDs w/ 8 MB cache
1 WD 7200 rpm 200 gig HD w/ 8 MB cache
1 Geforce FX 5700 Ultra video card
1 ATI TV Wonder Pro video card
and the peripherals and stuff

Anyone have any specific suggestions as to the motherboard, processor,
cooling, case, etc? Just remember I need to stay around 700 bucks.

GregoryD
10 answers Last reply
More about building system
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "GregoryD" <hagar@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:FJOdnbTEMcA592TdRVn-ug@comcast.com...
    > Need some advice on building a new system. I have some components
    > that will simply be moved into it, and I have a budget of about $700
    > dollars to spend. I will run games on this machine, but for the most
    > part, I will be using it to develop applications and run Oracle Financials
    > for training purposes. My current PC is going in the living room to
    > run emulators. I've just started some research on the differences
    > between the new P4 and AMD chips, both 32 and 64 bit models, but
    > there's so little software out there that's truly 64 bit nowadays that
    > it seems to be inconclusive. I will need at least 1 GB of RAM on the
    > new machine due to the size of the applications I'll be running.
    >
    > Here's what I already have:
    >
    > 2 Maxtor 7200 rpm 80 gig HDs w/ 8 MB cache
    > 1 WD 7200 rpm 200 gig HD w/ 8 MB cache
    > 1 Geforce FX 5700 Ultra video card
    > 1 ATI TV Wonder Pro video card
    > and the peripherals and stuff
    >
    > Anyone have any specific suggestions as to the motherboard, processor,
    > cooling, case, etc? Just remember I need to stay around 700 bucks.
    >
    > GregoryD
    >
    >

    Well, you can have lots of RAM, or you can build on a budget. You want to
    do both, and end up with a decent gaming system, which is TOUGH. First, I
    think it's safe to rule out Athlon64, as I haven't seen a board with more
    than three RAM slots for that proc., and it's pricey. So you are looking at
    a mid-range P4 or AthlonXP. For the money, you'll get better performance
    (more bang for the buck) going athlonxp. Try a Gigabyte GA-7N400 Pro2
    mainboard. It's loaded, and can be had for about a hundred bucks. Plus it
    supports 8 IDE drives right out of the box. (and room for SATA drives later)
    Forget about using onboard sound for gaming, so pick up a Creative or Turtle
    Beach brand sound card for forty bucks or less. Add an AthlonXP processor
    WITH 400 FSB for less than two hundred bucks. (3200+ is doable) Start with
    1Gig (2X512MB) of name-brand DDR400 RAM for less than two hundred bucks.
    You can add another pair of 512MB sticks later. Try a Fortron brand
    FSP530-60GNA power supply for about 80 bucks in any case. You should be
    able to keep this below 700, even after adding a DVD burner. -Dave
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote...
    >
    >> Need some advice on building a new system. I have some components
    >> that will simply be moved into it, and I have a budget of about $700
    >> dollars to spend.
    >>
    >> Anyone have any specific suggestions as to the motherboard, processor,
    >> cooling, case, etc?
    >
    > First, I
    > think it's safe to rule out Athlon64, as I haven't seen a board with more
    > than three RAM slots for that proc., and it's pricey.


    Not even close! A quick search at Newegg gives:

    ABIT "AV8" K8T800 Pro Chipset Motherboard for AMD Socket 939 CPU (has 4 RAM
    slots), $129:
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=13-127-181&depa=0

    with AMD Athlon 64 2800+, 512KB L2 Cache, 64-bit Processor - Retail, $185:
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?submit=property&DEPA=0 (add $38
    for the 3000+ or $97 for the 3200+)

    and 2 x Corsair Value Select 184 Pin 512MB DDR PC-3200 - OEM, $168:
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?submit=property&DEPA=0

    That's a total of $482 for the guts of a basic Athlon 64 system, leaving
    over $200 for the case, power supply, fans, etc. They are also well in line
    with the prices you estimated for the XP.

    With the Athlon 64 you get the advantages of Hypertransport and the on-die
    memory controller, upgradability (when the prices of the faster chips come
    down), and ability to run a 64-bit OS when it's ready for prime time.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >
    > Not even close! A quick search at Newegg gives:
    >
    > ABIT "AV8" K8T800 Pro Chipset Motherboard for AMD Socket 939 CPU (has 4
    RAM
    > slots), $129:
    >
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=13-127-181&depa=0
    >
    > with AMD Athlon 64 2800+, 512KB L2 Cache, 64-bit Processor - Retail, $185:
    > http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?submit=property&DEPA=0 (add $38
    > for the 3000+ or $97 for the 3200+)
    >

    I agree that Athlon 64 is a good idea if the OP can fit it into his budget.
    But I don't think a 754 processor is going to help him much if he buys a 939
    mainboard. -Dave
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    First off, you quoted a 939 pin motherboard, which is the FX series
    processor (much more expensive). The processor you quoted won't fit in the
    board you recommended. Second, AMD64 processors have the memory controller
    onboard. That, coupled with additional memory "paths" make the AMD 64 a very
    demanding system when it comes to memory. Any memory that has "Value" in its
    name translates to "Cheap" in my experience, and is not a good choice for a
    64 bit system.
    From MWave.com:
    AMD ATHLON 64 3200+ OEM 64-BIT BUNDLE W/ Details (FARCRY PC GAME; GIGABYTE
    K8NS PRO; MWAVE COPPER PLATE FAN; NO MEMORY; NO TESTING) is $378.00.

    Add 1 GB of quality memory (I'm using Mushkin Level 1 PC3500) and that's
    another $350.00- and we're over budget without adding a power supply
    (AMD64's require a minimum of 20 AMPS on the 12V line)- again, cheap isn't
    going to cut it.

    Try a AthlonXP motherboard/processor combo with 1 GB of decent memory. MWave
    had come acceptable cases at decent prices, but you'll probably want to add
    a fan or two.

    Fitz
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I guess since I took the time to criticize the AMD64 for 700 bucks idea, I
    should give a reasonable option.
    I picked the case pretty much at random, but it gives you an idea. All this
    is from MWave, but there are other sites to choose from.
    The motherboard has on-board sound that is very good- Soundstorm. It's
    better (IMHO) than alot of sound cards, and more than
    adequate for gaming (Sensaura built in). If the PS and memory seem high, you
    can always go lower, but I don't believe in skimping
    on power or RAM (quantity or quality).


    ABIT AN7 BUNDLE W/ COOLING FAN (AMD XP 3000+(333Mhz); NO MEMORY; NO TESTING)
    $233.00
    ANTEC TRUE430 430W UL & FCC POWER SUPPLY FOR ATX CASES $70.00
    ENERMAX CSX 10182-BA (BLACK) MID TOWER NO POWER SUPPLY & 80mm CASE FAN
    x 3 69.00
    CORSAIR CMX512-2700C2 64X64 333MHZ 512MB CL2 DDR DIMM W/HEAT
    SPREADER $135.00 (X2 = 270.00)

    Total: $ 642.00 + shipping

    Good Luck,
    Fitz


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  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote...
    >
    > I agree that Athlon 64 is a good idea if the OP can fit it into his
    budget.
    > But I don't think a 754 processor is going to help him much if he buys a
    > 939 mainboard.

    OK; my bad.

    Instead, try a basic Opteron system (still at Newegg):

    ASUS "SK8N" nForce3 Pro150 Chipset Motherboard for AMD Socket 940 CPU: $177

    AMD Opteron Model 140, 1MB L2 Cache 64-bit Processor - Retail: $178
    There are 2 other options for $1 or $2 more, and a dual-socket board (can
    still use the 140 if only 1 CPU installed, but the 240 is only $14 more) for
    $43 more. Options up to the 144 or 242 are still within the price bogey.

    2 x Buffalo Technology 184 Pin 512MB ECC Registered DDR PC-2700 - OEM:
    $236

    Still at $591, which leaves $109 for the case and power supply...
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 13:06:33 -0500, "GregoryD" <hagar@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >Need some advice on building a new system. I have some components
    >that will simply be moved into it, and I have a budget of about $700
    >dollars to spend. I will run games on this machine, but for the most
    >part, I will be using it to develop applications and run Oracle Financials
    >for training purposes. My current PC is going in the living room to
    >run emulators. I've just started some research on the differences
    >between the new P4 and AMD chips, both 32 and 64 bit models, but
    >there's so little software out there that's truly 64 bit nowadays that
    >it seems to be inconclusive. I will need at least 1 GB of RAM on the
    >new machine due to the size of the applications I'll be running.
    >
    >Here's what I already have:
    >
    >2 Maxtor 7200 rpm 80 gig HDs w/ 8 MB cache
    >1 WD 7200 rpm 200 gig HD w/ 8 MB cache
    >1 Geforce FX 5700 Ultra video card
    >1 ATI TV Wonder Pro video card
    >and the peripherals and stuff
    >
    >Anyone have any specific suggestions as to the motherboard, processor,
    >cooling, case, etc? Just remember I need to stay around 700 bucks.
    >
    >GregoryD
    >
    >

    Just a couple of opinions from my experience (shopping on Newegg.com
    of course).

    You can keep one PCI slot open by getting an All-In-Wonder radeon 9800
    Pro AGP which has the TV wonder Pro capabilities and is a good
    graphics card. Don't get the VE or "barebones" type.

    I like the cases that use metal rails to mount the 5.25" drives from
    the front. Then you only need to open one side of the case to replace
    a drive. Mine is made by Enlight, but check the specific case see if
    it has has rails. I don't know if the Antec cases have rails or if you
    have to open both sides to change a 5.25" drive.

    For power supplies I like the Allied 400 Watt.

    Kingston ValueRam memory has been very reliable. Simpletech is not.

    I did a search for MB's with a full 6 PCI slots and there is a good
    selection of Asus and MSI Socket A KT600 boards for under $70. Soyo is
    a little more expensive. You might as well get a board with 6 instead
    of being 1 short. To go with that an Athlon XP 2000+ is a bargain at
    $52, but let your budget be your guide.

    A liteOn SOHW-832S WHT *double layer* 8x DVD retail drive is $86.99
    However, it does not support DVD-RAM. The LG GSA-4120BI is $105.00 and
    supports double layer and *DVD-RAM* which is popular for more reliable
    data backup. They all burn CDs as well.

    Any of the Audigy 2 PCI cards are good for general purpose video and
    gaming. I suggest the M-Audio Revolution for audio recording, but it
    has limited inputs and tends to be sluggish for other purposes.

    Unless you have your mind made up you might look at the higher rated
    Seagate hard drives. They have good customer service.

    Good Luck!
    -Alan
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Al wrote:

    > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 13:06:33 -0500, "GregoryD" <hagar@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Need some advice on building a new system. I have some components
    >>that will simply be moved into it, and I have a budget of about $700
    >>dollars to spend. I will run games on this machine, but for the most
    >>part, I will be using it to develop applications and run Oracle Financials
    >>for training purposes. My current PC is going in the living room to
    >>run emulators. I've just started some research on the differences
    >>between the new P4 and AMD chips, both 32 and 64 bit models, but
    >>there's so little software out there that's truly 64 bit nowadays that
    >>it seems to be inconclusive. I will need at least 1 GB of RAM on the
    >>new machine due to the size of the applications I'll be running.
    >>
    >>Here's what I already have:
    >>
    >>2 Maxtor 7200 rpm 80 gig HDs w/ 8 MB cache
    >>1 WD 7200 rpm 200 gig HD w/ 8 MB cache
    >>1 Geforce FX 5700 Ultra video card
    >>1 ATI TV Wonder Pro video card
    >>and the peripherals and stuff
    >>
    >>Anyone have any specific suggestions as to the motherboard, processor,
    >>cooling, case, etc? Just remember I need to stay around 700 bucks.
    >>
    >>GregoryD
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > Just a couple of opinions from my experience (shopping on Newegg.com
    > of course).
    >
    > You can keep one PCI slot open by getting an All-In-Wonder radeon 9800

    The integrated tuner saves a PCI slot but it also limits what one can do
    with it as the PCI bus can only burst in one direction at a time and that
    means you can't use any post processing software on the TV video while
    viewing it (video must go directly from the tuner to the display right on
    the card). It also doesn't use the common tuner chipsets that most software
    is written for.

    > Pro AGP which has the TV wonder Pro capabilities and is a good
    > graphics card. Don't get the VE or "barebones" type.
    >
    > I like the cases that use metal rails to mount the 5.25" drives from
    > the front. Then you only need to open one side of the case to replace
    > a drive. Mine is made by Enlight, but check the specific case see if
    > it has has rails. I don't know if the Antec cases have rails or if you
    > have to open both sides to change a 5.25" drive.
    >
    > For power supplies I like the Allied 400 Watt.
    >
    > Kingston ValueRam memory has been very reliable. Simpletech is not.
    >
    > I did a search for MB's with a full 6 PCI slots and there is a good
    > selection of Asus and MSI Socket A KT600 boards for under $70. Soyo is
    > a little more expensive. You might as well get a board with 6 instead
    > of being 1 short. To go with that an Athlon XP 2000+ is a bargain at
    > $52, but let your budget be your guide.
    >
    > A liteOn SOHW-832S WHT *double layer* 8x DVD retail drive is $86.99
    > However, it does not support DVD-RAM. The LG GSA-4120BI is $105.00 and
    > supports double layer and *DVD-RAM* which is popular for more reliable
    > data backup. They all burn CDs as well.
    >
    > Any of the Audigy 2 PCI cards are good for general purpose video and
    > gaming. I suggest the M-Audio Revolution for audio recording, but it
    > has limited inputs and tends to be sluggish for other purposes.
    >
    > Unless you have your mind made up you might look at the higher rated
    > Seagate hard drives. They have good customer service.
    >
    > Good Luck!
    > -Alan
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 18:14:10 -0500, David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net>
    wrote:

    You're right about some limitations on the ATI capture cards - I
    haven't found a way to switch between tuner and video input with 3rd
    party software. But ATI does have closed captioning and text caputure
    in their own software which might be interesting to some people.

    The most common feature left out of a video capture card is a Stereo
    TV tuner. The ATI VE version is mono. I think some of their models use
    software MPEG instead of hardware.

    The most features to look for are real-time hardware MPEG-2 encoding
    and a Stereo tuner.

    --- trim
    >
    >The integrated tuner saves a PCI slot but it also limits what one can do
    >with it as the PCI bus can only burst in one direction at a time and that
    >means you can't use any post processing software on the TV video while
    >viewing it (video must go directly from the tuner to the display right on
    >the card). It also doesn't use the common tuner chipsets that most software
    >is written for.
    >
    >> Pro AGP which has the TV wonder Pro capabilities and is a good
    >> graphics card. Don't get the VE or "barebones" type.
    >>
    >> I like the cases that use metal rails to mount the 5.25" drives from
    >> the front. Then you only need to open one side of the case to replace
    >> a drive. Mine is made by Enlight, but check the specific case see if
    >> it has has rails. I don't know if the Antec cases have rails or if you
    >> have to open both sides to change a 5.25" drive.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Al wrote:

    > On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 18:14:10 -0500, David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    > You're right about some limitations on the ATI capture cards - I
    > haven't found a way to switch between tuner and video input with 3rd
    > party software. But ATI does have closed captioning and text caputure
    > in their own software which might be interesting to some people.

    True. I just don't like being stuck with only their software. Especially
    when their 'solution' to scrambled video is to fiddle around with the
    display's color depth whenever it happens because they've heard some folks
    say it sometimes helps. Then, next time, switch it back.

    >
    > The most common feature left out of a video capture card is a Stereo
    > TV tuner.

    There are plenty that have stereo.

    > The ATI VE version is mono. I think some of their models use
    > software MPEG instead of hardware.
    >
    > The most features to look for are real-time hardware MPEG-2 encoding
    > and a Stereo tuner.
    >
    > --- trim
    >
    >>The integrated tuner saves a PCI slot but it also limits what one can do
    >>with it as the PCI bus can only burst in one direction at a time and that
    >>means you can't use any post processing software on the TV video while
    >>viewing it (video must go directly from the tuner to the display right on
    >>the card). It also doesn't use the common tuner chipsets that most software
    >>is written for.
    >>
    >>
    >>>Pro AGP which has the TV wonder Pro capabilities and is a good
    >>>graphics card. Don't get the VE or "barebones" type.
    >>>
    >>>I like the cases that use metal rails to mount the 5.25" drives from
    >>>the front. Then you only need to open one side of the case to replace
    >>>a drive. Mine is made by Enlight, but check the specific case see if
    >>>it has has rails. I don't know if the Antec cases have rails or if you
    >>>have to open both sides to change a 5.25" drive.
    >
    >
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