Sempron 2800+ ABIT AN7 for budget 'organ transplant'?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hi, some background. I've never changed a mobo, just cards, RAM, HDs… I
need a new HD, but my mobo is so old: SDRAM, Duron, ATA 66, pre-137GB
BIOS, & probable incompatibilities if I mix new with old. This led me to
think that a new "Combo CPU + Mother board" from Fry's looks the best
deal. Also, the ~160 GB ATA133 HD looks best deal (SATA still possible
in future with most mobos). And, PC3200 or 2700.

Fry's lowest priced combo is $60 for Sempron 2400+ ECS K7VTA3 Version
8.0c. But Usenet posts warn me off ECS or that board. So, REJECT. :-)

Next good deal is Sempron 2800+ ABIT AN7 nForce2 Ultra 400 Socket A
266/333/400 MHz FSB $90-100.
Jul 2004 Usenet posts.. implied AN7 was too new. But, I figure now, Sep
04, AN7 is 'mature'.

Any comments, cautions?
Do I have to be anymore paranoid about grounding than I do when
changing RAM? (I stay put when messing with the innards, but don't have
any ground strap for wrist or bodypart, though I could rig wire out
window to house's ground rod)

It's just a basic home use computer. Net, word processing, some basic
still image work. Port/connections used are only Ethernet, USB,
Parallel.
6 answers Last reply
More about sempron 2800 abit budget organ transplant
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 22:18:56 +0000, MsOsWin@nonooo.com wrote:

    > Any comments, cautions?

    Semprons are not rated the same as XP's. They use a different set of
    benchmarks. A Sempron 2800+ is nothing more than a relabeled 2400+ but
    with a default FSB of 166MHz. Both run at 2000MHz and both perform about
    the same because basically they are the same. The major difference is that
    with the relabeling and upping the model numbers by about 400 for each
    socket A Sempron, they also raised the price above the XP equivilant.
    IOW's treat them like a mad dog and stay away from them. Since it appears
    you are concerned with how much you spend, you might just want to consider
    upgrading the CPU only and keeping your old MB if it's in good working
    condition.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    <MsOsWin@nonooo.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns95619B1B59E31MsOsWinnonooocom@65.245.115.2...
    > Hi, some background. I've never changed a mobo, just cards, RAM, HDs. I
    > need a new HD, but my mobo is so old: SDRAM, Duron, ATA 66, pre-137GB
    > BIOS, & probable incompatibilities if I mix new with old. This led me to
    > think that a new "Combo CPU + Mother board" from Fry's looks the best
    > deal. Also, the ~160 GB ATA133 HD looks best deal (SATA still possible
    > in future with most mobos). And, PC3200 or 2700.
    >
    > Fry's lowest priced combo is $60 for Sempron 2400+ ECS K7VTA3 Version
    > 8.0c. But Usenet posts warn me off ECS or that board. So, REJECT. :-)
    >
    > Next good deal is Sempron 2800+ ABIT AN7 nForce2 Ultra 400 Socket A
    > 266/333/400 MHz FSB $90-100.
    > Jul 2004 Usenet posts.. implied AN7 was too new. But, I figure now, Sep
    > 04, AN7 is 'mature'.
    >
    > Any comments, cautions?
    > Do I have to be anymore paranoid about grounding than I do when
    > changing RAM? (I stay put when messing with the innards, but don't have
    > any ground strap for wrist or bodypart, though I could rig wire out
    > window to house's ground rod)
    >
    > It's just a basic home use computer. Net, word processing, some basic
    > still image work. Port/connections used are only Ethernet, USB,
    > Parallel.

    The AN7 is ok but a far better CPU would be a Athlon XP2500+. It is cheaper
    than the Sempron has at least equal performance and MUCH better
    overclockability.

    --
    *****Replace 'NOSPAM' with 'btinternet' in the reply address*****
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Its not necessary that anything is earth grounded. It is only
    necessary to prevent any sparks to the mobo and such. By sparks I
    mean the type you get when touching a wall switch in the winter. FYI,
    it takes about a 3,000+ volt spark for you to even feel it on your
    skin. Smaller 2,000 volt sparks can damage components without you
    realizing it.

    The method I use is to *first* touch and hold the side of the case
    (exposed metal) with one hand while working with the other hand. In
    this way the spark doesn't reach the components. When I need both
    hands then I lay one arm against the side of the case while working.
    A spark between you and the case is not a problem. A spark between
    you and the mobo or chip is to be avoided at all costs.

    Forrest

    Motherboard Help By HAL web site:
    http://home.comcast.net/~mobo.help/


    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 22:18:56 +0000 (UTC), "MsOsWin@nonooo.com"
    <MsOsWin@nonooo.com> wrote:

    < snip >
    >Do I have to be anymore paranoid about grounding than I do when
    >changing RAM? (I stay put when messing with the innards, but don't have
    >any ground strap for wrist or bodypart, though I could rig wire out
    >window to house's ground rod)
    < snip >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    - HAL9000 <gumpy@mail.org> in news:r869k0lm37bamc1oiere2tonri1ju93qkb@
    4ax.com:

    > Its not necessary that anything is earth grounded. It is only
    > necessary to prevent any sparks to the mobo and such.

    erk, right. i forgot. strap goes to teh *frame's* ground

    going to house ground is especially useless since i'd have unplugged teh
    case from the house's ground, so teh computer's ground wouln'dt be tied
    to house ground anymore. (/smack my own head) :)

    By sparks I
    > mean the type you get when touching a wall switch in the winter. FYI,
    > it takes about a 3,000+ volt spark for you to even feel it on your
    > skin. Smaller 2,000 volt sparks can damage components without you
    > realizing it.

    yeah, think i've read it's the really low current (with hi volts)...
    we can't feel those.

    > The method I use is to *first* touch and hold the side of the case
    > (exposed metal) with one hand while working with the other hand. In
    > this way the spark doesn't reach the components. When I need both
    > hands then I lay one arm against the side of the case while working.
    > A spark between you and the case is not a problem. A spark between
    > you and the mobo or chip is to be avoided at all costs.
    >
    > Forrest

    i touch unpainted metal on box, often, and avoid moving around

    -------
    > Motherboard Help By HAL web site:
    > http://home.comcast.net/~mobo.help/

    hmm... i looked at teh toms hardware PS link.. my PS is sparkle 300w
    that replaced a 250w cheapo that burnt.. (cheapo mfr PS came in the
    local shop's computer that i bought) I tend to do little else while
    burning CDs, so i guess i havn'et overloaded the 300w. (btw, the 250w
    burnt BEFORE i put in the cdrw )
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    ocing?
    I'm a noob's noob :_)

    I'M not planning to oc, especially since the atmosphere gets hot around
    where I live. and I've read that Oc-ers resort to use cooling systems to
    allow higher oc. But i'm trying to 'K.I.S.S'

    oc-ing is interesting, tho. kind of like race-tested auto design or like
    street nitro? :)

    http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/116_9509_blow/


    -----------
    Side note:

    I see most Usenet posts in the last year about nForce2 Ultra involve
    linux.kernel ...

    Side note
    ---
    outpost
    http://shop1.outpost.com/search?search_type=adv&resultpage=0&sqxts=1
    &order_by=s00d&query_string=++Abit++&minprice=&maxprice=100&x=1&y=7

    info is better than Abit's!
    http://www.abit-usa.com/products/mb/products.php?categories=1&model=158
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "BigBadger" <big_badger@NOSPAM.com> in
    news:ci116t$b3l$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk:

    > The AN7 is ok but a far better CPU would be a Athlon XP2500+. It is
    > cheaper than the Sempron has at least equal performance and MUCH
    > better overclockability.

    I'm glad to read your suggestion.
    I'd looked at
    http://www.anandtech.com/linux/showdoc.aspx?i=2170
    benchmark tests of a Sempron, an XP and two AMD 64s. most of the tests
    that seemed critical to my uses showed the semp usually as good as the
    xp (and about as good as the 64's). But now I see they compared a slow
    Xp2200 to the socket 754 Sempron 3100.

    And
    http://hardware.mcse.ms/message50395.html
    "And the Sempron for Socket A 2800+ is actually a tbred B core
    running slower (12x166) than the XP 2600+ tbred (12.5x166)."

    aha...

    of course CPUs can't be tested without involving effects of OS, chosen
    benchmarks, chipsets, boards, etc.

    also, mine is a budget machine, I want to keep costs low. Because there
    are zillions of options that change everyday, i have to begin my
    research with total costs of locally available bits. I could call local
    independent shops tomorrow, to see what AN7 + an Athlon XP2500+ (or
    other cpu+mobo) would cost
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