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Travelling with a pocket pc

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August 14, 2004 3:29:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Hi,

I have just been travelling on business in the US with my pocket pc and come
across a couple of problems, perhaps there is someone out there who can
help?

Firstly most of the Hotels I stayed in had free fast internet access in the
room. I have an HP150 with wi-fi but in most cases the wi-fi was charged and
the internet with connection to the boxes in the rooms was free, how do I
connect to the boxes? There was an Ethernet connection or a modem connection
from the box, is it as simple as buying a wireless access port and taking
that with me or do I need to do something else. If a wireless access port is
the solution can anyone recomend a unit?

Secondly I sync with outlook at work on my PC, is there a way of doing this
remotely from the internet so that once I have a connection established that
I can sync my pocket pc with my work pc?

Thanks in advance

Gary

More about : travelling pocket

Anonymous
August 14, 2004 3:29:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

If the hotel has free WiFi then you should be able to simply connect, with no login required, from
your 802.11b equipped PocketPC. That has been my experience with Holiday Inn Express hotels for
example.

If the in-room internet connection is via wired Ethernet or telephone line then you obviously need a
wired Ethernet card or a dial modem for your PPC. I used, before it blew up on me, a Socket LP-E CF+
wired Ethernet card. I currently have a Targus V.90 56K modem also. In the case of the wired
Ethernet port generally logging in has been either just plug in and go (like the wireless access
described above) or I had to supply my name and company name and go when presented with a login
screen.

With a dialup modem connection, then you need to have a personal ISP to dial into or a corporate RAS
number if your trying to connect to you office network.

Note that one of the Mobile Device MVPs carries his old ORiNOCO RG-1000 wireless access point with
him. He simply plugs the ORiNOCO device into the wired Ethernet port and has wireless access in his
room. Similarly you can purchase a device for the same purpose, ie. adding wireless access to your
hotel room if the room only has a wired Ethernet connection...Here is an example of one such device.

http://www.netgear.com/products/prod_details.php?prodID...

As far as remotely synchronizing, a safe and secure way to do that is via a VPN tunnel. Here is how
I did that...

http://members.cox.net/ajarvi/WM2003/WM2003PPTPVPN.html

You might check with your office network administrators about that issue however. Make sure your
authorized to do that, etc. If the office runs Exchange you may be able to sync directly with the
Exchange server..

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...

"Sniffer" <sniffer@tesco.net> wrote in message news:AImTc.607$1z2.44@newsfe6-gui.ntli.net...
> Hi,
>
> I have just been travelling on business in the US with my pocket pc and come
> across a couple of problems, perhaps there is someone out there who can
> help?
>
> Firstly most of the Hotels I stayed in had free fast internet access in the
> room. I have an HP150 with wi-fi but in most cases the wi-fi was charged and
> the internet with connection to the boxes in the rooms was free, how do I
> connect to the boxes? There was an Ethernet connection or a modem connection
> from the box, is it as simple as buying a wireless access port and taking
> that with me or do I need to do something else. If a wireless access port is
> the solution can anyone recomend a unit?
>
> Secondly I sync with outlook at work on my PC, is there a way of doing this
> remotely from the internet so that once I have a connection established that
> I can sync my pocket pc with my work pc?
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> Gary
>
>
August 14, 2004 3:29:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Reply to message from "Sniffer" <sniffer@tesco.net> (Sat, 14 Aug 2004 07:
29:36) about "Travelling with a pocket pc":

q1 - wireless access point. I've used different types ... but don't like
dlink. Others will love dkink though.

q2 - I don't think you can connect remotely to an exchange server ... other
than by using vpn connection or owa.



Bye
Ann <nospam@netzero.com> Sat, 14 Aug 2004 06:00:10 -0400

=== Posted with Qusnetsoft NewsReader 2.2.0.8

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sniffer" <sniffer@tesco.net> Sent: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 07:29:36
Subject: Travelling with a pocket pc


Hi,

I have just been travelling on business in the US with my pocket pc and
come across a couple of problems, perhaps there is someone out there who
can help?

Firstly most of the Hotels I stayed in had free fast internet access in the
room. I have an HP150 with wi-fi but in most cases the wi-fi was charged
and the internet with connection to the boxes in the rooms was free, how do
I connect to the boxes? There was an Ethernet connection or a modem
connection from the box, is it as simple as buying a wireless access port
and taking that with me or do I need to do something else. If a wireless
access port is the solution can anyone recomend a unit?

Secondly I sync with outlook at work on my PC, is there a way of doing this
remotely from the internet so that once I have a connection established
that I can sync my pocket pc with my work pc?

Thanks in advance

Gary
Related resources
August 14, 2004 6:01:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

See, here I got a question on that topic, from the other side of the
problem.
Do travellers expect a wired connection, or a wireless one? Which wireless
protocol is preferred? Currently, we're providing our guests with free
DSL, i.e. they can simply connect their laptops or other devices to
Ethernet jack and connect to the LAN, get an IP address from the DHCP
server and are thus online within seconds. For people who have their NIC
configured to access their company Intranet, I even provide PCMCIA NICs,
so the existing settings don't have to be fooled around with.
Now how widespread _is_ the use of wireless enabled PDAs, TabletPCs or
laptops anyway? How complicated is it to set up a guest connection with a
W-LAN if the latter is secured from war-driving?
August 14, 2004 6:01:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 14:01:57 GMT, "René"
<garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote:

>How complicated is it to set up a guest connection with a
>W-LAN if the latter is secured from war-driving?

If you've already configured your facility with Ethernet high-speed,
you may want to consider placing a wireless router in the lobby, or
other common areas of the building, so those with 802.11-only devices
can also access the Internet.

The cost would be quite minimal.

A_C
Anonymous
August 14, 2004 6:01:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

If the local wireless LAN is secured then users need the correct WEP key to access the network. If
the SSID is *NOT* being broadcast, then the users also need that information. It simply depends on
what security measures you have in place for the wireless network as to what would be required for
users to access the network...

There are devices that you can purchase that are specific for the purpose of setting up a wireless
hotspot for hotels, businesses, etc. Here is an example from Zyxel, the Zyair B-4000. Users will not
see each other and you can setup specific login Ids, etc....This is the UK Zyxel page...The US page
is currently not available for some reason...

http://www.zyxel.co.uk/product/model.php?indexcate=1060...

I got the information from this DSL Reports thread...

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,10714933

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...

"René" <garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:p XoTc.230$7B4.29@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com...
> See, here I got a question on that topic, from the other side of the problem.
> Do travellers expect a wired connection, or a wireless one? Which wireless protocol is preferred?
> Currently, we're providing our guests with free DSL, i.e. they can simply connect their laptops or
> other devices to Ethernet jack and connect to the LAN, get an IP address from the DHCP server and
> are thus online within seconds. For people who have their NIC configured to access their company
> Intranet, I even provide PCMCIA NICs, so the existing settings don't have to be fooled around
> with.
> Now how widespread _is_ the use of wireless enabled PDAs, TabletPCs or laptops anyway? How
> complicated is it to set up a guest connection with a W-LAN if the latter is secured from
> war-driving?
>
Anonymous
August 14, 2004 7:27:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Configuring a new PC Card that you supply is probably as difficult as
re-configuring the one they already have. If you are using DHCP and the
guest's company is as well, there is usually no issue. If the company uses
static addresses it is typically simple to go into the network settings and
click DHCP. If the quest doesn't have the permissions to do that he likely
can't install the drivers for your card either.

I'm not a security guru, but I would suppose you could just provide guests a
WEP key if they request one, and change it often. I would ensure that the
guest LAN is distinct from your hotel LAN in some fashion. With careful
placement though, you are not going to get too many folks sitting outside
your hotel and using your bandwidth. Guests should be cautioned that they
are on a common LAN, and should be careful what they share.

--
Sven, MS-MVP Mobile Devices
"Agent_C" <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:j18sh01c0rrgk0jflc1kjovf2a2hnnmal1@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 14:01:57 GMT, "René"
> <garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >How complicated is it to set up a guest connection with a
> >W-LAN if the latter is secured from war-driving?
>
> If you've already configured your facility with Ethernet high-speed,
> you may want to consider placing a wireless router in the lobby, or
> other common areas of the building, so those with 802.11-only devices
> can also access the Internet.
>
> The cost would be quite minimal.
>
> A_C
>
August 14, 2004 9:46:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Sooner Al wrote:
> It simply depends on what security measures you have in place
> for the wireless network

No security features yet. No wireless network either. This is still in
pre-deployment.

> an example from Zyxel, the Zyair B-4000.

Oomph. Quite the price tag on that one.
Anonymous
August 14, 2004 9:46:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

It may be expensive, I don't really know how it stacks up against others... I do believe that in
your apparent situation (and I know nothing about your business) a commercial grade system may be
more effective security wise than trying to adapt a home user grade system. The important thing to
keep in mind, IMO, is that you want guest users isolated from your private network and from each
other, particularly the first, whether is wireless or wired internet access that you provide.

You may simply make a business decision to not offer wireless because you already have the wired
Ethernet and DSL available for guests...

Of course if your local competition offers both wired Ethernet and wireless, then that may also
force your hand...

Good luck...

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...

"René" <garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:JdsTc.307$cw5.53@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com...
> Sooner Al wrote:
>> It simply depends on what security measures you have in place
>> for the wireless network
>
> No security features yet. No wireless network either. This is still in pre-deployment.
>
>> an example from Zyxel, the Zyair B-4000.
>
> Oomph. Quite the price tag on that one.
>
August 14, 2004 11:23:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Sooner Al wrote:
> ... I do believe that in your apparent situation (and I know
> nothing about your business)

Read all about it: www.threeoaks-marshall.com ;) 

> The important thing to keep in mind, IMO, is that you want
> guest users isolated from your private network and from each
> other, particularly the first, whether is wireless or wired internet
> access that you provide.

That part is a piece of cake. A DHCP server/router/firewall/DSL "modem"
(Cayman 3546) hands out local IP addresses willy-nilly. Our computers
belong to WORKGROUPXYZ, guest computers don't. Guests may be able to see
that there is another workgroup prese...hmmm...I've never thought of
/that/...what if they just change their own settings to join WORKGROUPXYZ.
Gotta change workgroup membership to be MAC address dependent...Nawww, I
don't think our regulars are /that/ computer savvy.

> You may simply make a business decision to not offer
> wireless because you already have the wired Ethernet and
> DSL available for guests...

True. In two years, we had _one_ guest who actually brought a PocketPC
along.
Anonymous
August 14, 2004 11:23:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Nice place... I may have to come and stay with my wife...

Of course I will have my iPAQ 5555 and be looking for a wireless internet connection...:-)

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...

"René" <garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:qEtTc.278$fR5.131@newssvr23.news.prodigy.com...
> Sooner Al wrote:
>> ... I do believe that in your apparent situation (and I know
>> nothing about your business)
>
> Read all about it: www.threeoaks-marshall.com ;) 
>
>> The important thing to keep in mind, IMO, is that you want
>> guest users isolated from your private network and from each
>> other, particularly the first, whether is wireless or wired internet
>> access that you provide.
>
> That part is a piece of cake. A DHCP server/router/firewall/DSL "modem" (Cayman 3546) hands out
> local IP addresses willy-nilly. Our computers belong to WORKGROUPXYZ, guest computers don't.
> Guests may be able to see that there is another workgroup prese...hmmm...I've never thought of
> /that/...what if they just change their own settings to join WORKGROUPXYZ. Gotta change workgroup
> membership to be MAC address dependent...Nawww, I don't think our regulars are /that/ computer
> savvy.
>
>> You may simply make a business decision to not offer
>> wireless because you already have the wired Ethernet and
>> DSL available for guests...
>
> True. In two years, we had _one_ guest who actually brought a PocketPC along.
>
August 15, 2004 1:38:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Sven, MVP-Mobile Devices wrote:
> Configuring a new PC Card that you supply is probably as difficult as
> re-configuring the one they already have.

Not if you give them a 3Com 3CXE589ET. Drivers are included in Windows 98,
Me, 2000 and XP. Plug it in before you boot up the laptop and it will
install itself and fetch an IP address from the DHCP server automatically.
In the case of 2000 and XP even without having to reboot again.

> I'm not a security guru, but I would suppose you could just provide
> guests a WEP key if they request one, and change it often.

That's an idea.

> I would ensure that the guest LAN is distinct from your hotel LAN

Affirmative. Two different, separate workgroups.

> With careful placement though, you are not going to get too
> many folks sitting outside your hotel and using your bandwidth.

Nothing to fear from the locals. This is a small, back-water swamp town ;) 
Anonymous
August 15, 2004 1:38:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

With your relatively small requirements (I was not sure at first how big of an operation you were
talking about), personally I see no problem with a consumer grade wireless access point versus the
more expensive hotspot appliance I pointed to earlier as long as you take precautions to isolate, as
much as possible, your guests from your private network.

Personally I use a Buffalo Technology WBR-G54 4-Port Broadband Router/802.11b/g Wireless Access
Point in my 2700 sq. foot home. I did add an external antenna for added coverage because of where
the device is sited in my home. I bought that WBR-G54 device for $65 or so on sale from CompUSA. It
was very easy to setup, offers both b and g wireless, WPA support, etc. The newer version is the
WBR2-G54...

http://www.buffalotech.com/products/product-detail.php?...

You could look at these sites for product reviews...

http://www.homenethelp.com/
http://www.practicallynetworked.com/
http://www.timhiggins.com/

You also might run firewall software on your private machines to preclude guests accessing them by
accident or on purpose. If the machines are running XP, the new SP2 Windows Firewall is easily
configured for File & Print Sharing between your private machines only...

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=fh;EN-US;windowsxpsp2
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/inter...
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/inter...

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...

"René" <garbagejunkandcrap@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:p DvTc.346$EN6.108@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com...
> Sven, MVP-Mobile Devices wrote:
>> Configuring a new PC Card that you supply is probably as difficult as
>> re-configuring the one they already have.
>
> Not if you give them a 3Com 3CXE589ET. Drivers are included in Windows 98, Me, 2000 and XP. Plug
> it in before you boot up the laptop and it will install itself and fetch an IP address from the
> DHCP server automatically. In the case of 2000 and XP even without having to reboot again.
>
>> I'm not a security guru, but I would suppose you could just provide
>> guests a WEP key if they request one, and change it often.
>
> That's an idea.
>
>> I would ensure that the guest LAN is distinct from your hotel LAN
>
> Affirmative. Two different, separate workgroups.
>
>> With careful placement though, you are not going to get too
>> many folks sitting outside your hotel and using your bandwidth.
>
> Nothing to fear from the locals. This is a small, back-water swamp town ;) 
>
!