A new heatsink compound (thermal grease)

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hello All

Henkel Loctite have released a new heatsink compound which comes in the form
of a bar of material, deployed rather like a lip-stick.

You rub it on the heatsink/component interface and it applies an appropriate
layer of solid material. under high clamping pressures, the solid undergoes
a change to a liquid at 60 deg C (approx. 150 deg F) and is forced into all
the tiny gaps (present due to imperfections, machining tolerances etc.).

The thermal conductivity is 20% lower than the usual thermal grease - it
says it's 0.03 degC/W at 20psi clamping pressure, dropping to 0.02 degC/W at
100psi - and gives 100% surface wetting with easy application, it says.

My Prescott, o/c from 3 to 3.3 GHz, is running at stock voltages with the
stock Intel heastink. CPU temps reported by MBM5 (Abit AI7) are 60-62 deg C.
I plan to re-mount the heatsink having applied some of this thermstrate, and
I'll let you know if I see a drop in temperature. The current heatsink
compound is the usual white alumina-loaded stuff.

Here's some info on thermstrate:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?D4F321069

Does anybody know what the thermal conductivity is that's quoted for the
silver-loaded materials?

Cheers

RMC, England
10 answers Last reply
More about heatsink compound thermal grease
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "RMC" <RMC@home.com> wrote in message news:2rm9k0F1bv8enU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Hello All
    >
    > Henkel Loctite have released a new heatsink compound which comes in the
    form
    > of a bar of material, deployed rather like a lip-stick.
    >
    > You rub it on the heatsink/component interface and it applies an
    appropriate
    > layer of solid material. under high clamping pressures, the solid
    undergoes
    > a change to a liquid at 60 deg C (approx. 150 deg F) and is forced into
    all
    > the tiny gaps (present due to imperfections, machining tolerances etc.).
    >
    > The thermal conductivity is 20% lower than the usual thermal grease - it
    > says it's 0.03 degC/W at 20psi clamping pressure, dropping to 0.02 degC/W
    at
    > 100psi - and gives 100% surface wetting with easy application, it says.
    >
    > My Prescott, o/c from 3 to 3.3 GHz, is running at stock voltages with the
    > stock Intel heastink. CPU temps reported by MBM5 (Abit AI7) are 60-62 deg
    C.
    > I plan to re-mount the heatsink having applied some of this thermstrate,
    and
    > I'll let you know if I see a drop in temperature. The current heatsink
    > compound is the usual white alumina-loaded stuff.
    >
    > Here's some info on thermstrate:
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?D4F321069
    >
    > Does anybody know what the thermal conductivity is that's quoted for the
    > silver-loaded materials?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > RMC, England

    I'm running a Prescott 3.0, not overclocked at all. I've got a Cooler
    Master "Aero 4 Lite".

    http://www.coolermaster.com/index.php?LT=english&Language_s=2&url_place=product&p_serial=DI4-7J74F&other_title=+DI4-7J74F+Aero%204%20Lite

    With the stock thermal pad, I have not seen my Prescott go higher than 102F
    under load. In fact, it's usually about 90F idle and goes up to just UNDER
    100F under load. 102F was the very highest temperature I've seen. I use
    the speed control to set the fan at 2700RPM, as anything higher is
    noticeably louder, as far as noise goes. I don't overclock any processor,
    at all. But I COULD overclock the Prescott to 3.3 and still keep it down to
    about ~100F under load, simply by cranking up the RPM of the cooler to
    maximum. 150F is hot as Hell. I've seen that on a Prescott, but only in a
    case where I *expected* to see such high temperatures, due to overall poor
    air circulation in the system itself. Yeah, 150F may be within normal
    operating range, but as you can easily drop that temperature by a third, why
    wouldn't you?

    I think you need a new cooler as well as a change in thermal
    ompound. -Dave
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Where did you buy it at.
    John.H.

    Dave C. wrote:
    > "RMC" <RMC@home.com> wrote in message news:2rm9k0F1bv8enU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >
    >>Hello All
    >>
    >>Henkel Loctite have released a new heatsink compound which comes in the
    >
    > form
    >
    >>of a bar of material, deployed rather like a lip-stick.
    >>
    >>You rub it on the heatsink/component interface and it applies an
    >
    > appropriate
    >
    >>layer of solid material. under high clamping pressures, the solid
    >
    > undergoes
    >
    >>a change to a liquid at 60 deg C (approx. 150 deg F) and is forced into
    >
    > all
    >
    >>the tiny gaps (present due to imperfections, machining tolerances etc.).
    >>
    >>The thermal conductivity is 20% lower than the usual thermal grease - it
    >>says it's 0.03 degC/W at 20psi clamping pressure, dropping to 0.02 degC/W
    >
    > at
    >
    >>100psi - and gives 100% surface wetting with easy application, it says.
    >>
    >>My Prescott, o/c from 3 to 3.3 GHz, is running at stock voltages with the
    >>stock Intel heastink. CPU temps reported by MBM5 (Abit AI7) are 60-62 deg
    >
    > C.
    >
    >>I plan to re-mount the heatsink having applied some of this thermstrate,
    >
    > and
    >
    >>I'll let you know if I see a drop in temperature. The current heatsink
    >>compound is the usual white alumina-loaded stuff.
    >>
    >>Here's some info on thermstrate:
    >>http://makeashorterlink.com/?D4F321069
    >>
    >>Does anybody know what the thermal conductivity is that's quoted for the
    >>silver-loaded materials?
    >>
    >>Cheers
    >>
    >>RMC, England
    >
    >
    > I'm running a Prescott 3.0, not overclocked at all. I've got a Cooler
    > Master "Aero 4 Lite".
    >
    > http://www.coolermaster.com/index.php?LT=english&Language_s=2&url_place=product&p_serial=DI4-7J74F&other_title=+DI4-7J74F+Aero%204%20Lite
    >
    > With the stock thermal pad, I have not seen my Prescott go higher than 102F
    > under load. In fact, it's usually about 90F idle and goes up to just UNDER
    > 100F under load. 102F was the very highest temperature I've seen. I use
    > the speed control to set the fan at 2700RPM, as anything higher is
    > noticeably louder, as far as noise goes. I don't overclock any processor,
    > at all. But I COULD overclock the Prescott to 3.3 and still keep it down to
    > about ~100F under load, simply by cranking up the RPM of the cooler to
    > maximum. 150F is hot as Hell. I've seen that on a Prescott, but only in a
    > case where I *expected* to see such high temperatures, due to overall poor
    > air circulation in the system itself. Yeah, 150F may be within normal
    > operating range, but as you can easily drop that temperature by a third, why
    > wouldn't you?
    >
    > I think you need a new cooler as well as a change in thermal
    > ompound. -Dave
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "John H." <jhensleys@att.net> wrote in message
    news:jmp5d.633347$Gx4.402178@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > Where did you buy it at.
    > John.H.
    >
    > >
    > > I'm running a Prescott 3.0, not overclocked at all. I've got a Cooler
    > > Master "Aero 4 Lite".
    > >
    > >
    http://www.coolermaster.com/index.php?LT=english&Language_s=2&url_place=product&p_serial=DI4-7J74F&other_title=+DI4-7J74F+Aero%204%20Lite
    > >
    > > With the stock thermal pad, I have not seen my Prescott go higher than
    102F
    > > under load. In fact, it's usually about 90F idle and goes up to just
    UNDER
    > > 100F under load. 102F was the very highest temperature I've seen. I
    use
    > > the speed control to set the fan at 2700RPM, as anything higher is
    > > noticeably louder, as far as noise goes. I don't overclock any
    processor,
    > > at all. But I COULD overclock the Prescott to 3.3 and still keep it
    down to
    > > about ~100F under load, simply by cranking up the RPM of the cooler to
    > > maximum. 150F is hot as Hell. I've seen that on a Prescott, but only
    in a
    > > case where I *expected* to see such high temperatures, due to overall
    poor
    > > air circulation in the system itself. Yeah, 150F may be within normal
    > > operating range, but as you can easily drop that temperature by a third,
    why
    > > wouldn't you?
    > >
    > > I think you need a new cooler as well as a change in thermal
    > > ompound. -Dave
    > >

    I bought it from Newegg, for less than twenty bucks, from memory. If you
    run a search of froogle for aero 4 lite, you will get plenty of hits. It's
    a relatively cheap cooler, and VERY effective. -Dave

    http://froogle.google.com/froogle_advanced_search
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Where did you buy the thermstrate tc compound.

    Dave C. wrote:
    > "John H." <jhensleys@att.net> wrote in message
    > news:jmp5d.633347$Gx4.402178@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    >>Where did you buy it at.
    >>John.H.
    >>
    >>
    >>>I'm running a Prescott 3.0, not overclocked at all. I've got a Cooler
    >>>Master "Aero 4 Lite".
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    > http://www.coolermaster.com/index.php?LT=english&Language_s=2&url_place=product&p_serial=DI4-7J74F&other_title=+DI4-7J74F+Aero%204%20Lite
    >
    >>>With the stock thermal pad, I have not seen my Prescott go higher than
    >
    > 102F
    >
    >>>under load. In fact, it's usually about 90F idle and goes up to just
    >
    > UNDER
    >
    >>>100F under load. 102F was the very highest temperature I've seen. I
    >
    > use
    >
    >>>the speed control to set the fan at 2700RPM, as anything higher is
    >>>noticeably louder, as far as noise goes. I don't overclock any
    >
    > processor,
    >
    >>>at all. But I COULD overclock the Prescott to 3.3 and still keep it
    >
    > down to
    >
    >>>about ~100F under load, simply by cranking up the RPM of the cooler to
    >>>maximum. 150F is hot as Hell. I've seen that on a Prescott, but only
    >
    > in a
    >
    >>>case where I *expected* to see such high temperatures, due to overall
    >
    > poor
    >
    >>>air circulation in the system itself. Yeah, 150F may be within normal
    >>>operating range, but as you can easily drop that temperature by a third,
    >
    > why
    >
    >>>wouldn't you?
    >>>
    >>>I think you need a new cooler as well as a change in thermal
    >>>ompound. -Dave
    >>>
    >
    >
    > I bought it from Newegg, for less than twenty bucks, from memory. If you
    > run a search of froogle for aero 4 lite, you will get plenty of hits. It's
    > a relatively cheap cooler, and VERY effective. -Dave
    >
    > http://froogle.google.com/froogle_advanced_search
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "John H." <jhensleys@att.net> wrote in message
    news:hgr5d.633694$Gx4.576377@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > Where did you buy the thermstrate tc compound.
    >
    > >
    > > I bought it from Newegg, for less than twenty bucks, from memory. If
    you
    > > run a search of froogle for aero 4 lite, you will get plenty of hits.
    It's
    > > a relatively cheap cooler, and VERY effective. -Dave
    > >
    > > http://froogle.google.com/froogle_advanced_search
    > >

    I didn't. The thermal compound came as part of the cooler, pre-applied to
    the bottom of the cooler, in the area where the cooler contacts the socket
    478 processor. It had a plastic dish type thing on the bottom of the cooler
    to protect the thermal compound. You remove the plastic dish thingie, set
    the cooler on the processor, clip the heatsink to the motherboard brackets,
    plug the fan into a (hard drive type) power connector, install the control
    knob in an expansion slot or floppy bay, then plug the RPM sensor wire into
    the motherboard's CPU FAN connector. DONE! No messing around with thermal
    compound, unless you want to. But with a Prescott running at ~100F under
    load with stock thermal compound, why bother changing it? -Dave
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    RMC wrote:
    > Hello All
    >
    > Henkel Loctite have released a new heatsink compound which comes in the form
    > of a bar of material, deployed rather like a lip-stick.
    >
    > You rub it on the heatsink/component interface and it applies an appropriate
    > layer of solid material. under high clamping pressures, the solid undergoes
    > a change to a liquid at 60 deg C (approx. 150 deg F) and is forced into all
    > the tiny gaps (present due to imperfections, machining tolerances etc.).
    >
    > The thermal conductivity is 20% lower than the usual thermal grease - it
    > says it's 0.03 degC/W at 20psi clamping pressure, dropping to 0.02 degC/W at
    > 100psi - and gives 100% surface wetting with easy application, it says.
    >
    > My Prescott, o/c from 3 to 3.3 GHz, is running at stock voltages with the
    > stock Intel heastink. CPU temps reported by MBM5 (Abit AI7) are 60-62 deg C.
    > I plan to re-mount the heatsink having applied some of this thermstrate, and
    > I'll let you know if I see a drop in temperature. The current heatsink
    > compound is the usual white alumina-loaded stuff.
    >
    > Here's some info on thermstrate:
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?D4F321069
    >
    > Does anybody know what the thermal conductivity is that's quoted for the
    > silver-loaded materials?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > RMC, England
    >
    >

    Having had an expensive lesson from Intel on 'solid' thermal compounds,
    I'm very leery.

    Of course, Intel's boxed heatsink comes with their thermal pad already
    stuck on there. When the P4 gets hot, it melts to fill everything in
    like your product.

    Well, I was getting over heating on my P4 3.0 GHz HT. I noticed that the
    heatsink fins were covered in dust. So, I opened it up and unstrapped
    the heatsink. Then I pulled and had to pull hard. It came out, but with
    the P4 still glued to the heatsink. That room temp, solid thermal pad
    worked like construction adhesive.

    I was able to get them apart, but it took a bit. A few pins were bent,
    but not off. So, I straightened them - carefully. Alas, something got
    broken. I had to replace both the processor and the mobo. That was an
    expensive lesson.

    Therefore, I will only be using thermal conductors that won't be glue
    when and if I ever need to take them apart.

    Clyde
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    1 Question........... why did you remove the HS for just a 'blow out'
    cleaning?

    "Clyde" <lughclyde@attbi.comedy> wrote in message
    news:3iD5d.373445$8_6.302438@attbi_s04...
    > RMC wrote:
    > > Hello All
    > >
    > > Henkel Loctite have released a new heatsink compound which comes
    in the form
    > > of a bar of material, deployed rather like a lip-stick.
    > >
    > > You rub it on the heatsink/component interface and it applies an
    appropriate
    > > layer of solid material. under high clamping pressures, the solid
    undergoes
    > > a change to a liquid at 60 deg C (approx. 150 deg F) and is forced
    into all
    > > the tiny gaps (present due to imperfections, machining tolerances
    etc.).
    > >
    > > The thermal conductivity is 20% lower than the usual thermal
    grease - it
    > > says it's 0.03 degC/W at 20psi clamping pressure, dropping to 0.02
    degC/W at
    > > 100psi - and gives 100% surface wetting with easy application, it
    says.
    > >
    > > My Prescott, o/c from 3 to 3.3 GHz, is running at stock voltages
    with the
    > > stock Intel heastink. CPU temps reported by MBM5 (Abit AI7) are
    60-62 deg C.
    > > I plan to re-mount the heatsink having applied some of this
    thermstrate, and
    > > I'll let you know if I see a drop in temperature. The current
    heatsink
    > > compound is the usual white alumina-loaded stuff.
    > >
    > > Here's some info on thermstrate:
    > > http://makeashorterlink.com/?D4F321069
    > >
    > > Does anybody know what the thermal conductivity is that's quoted
    for the
    > > silver-loaded materials?
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > >
    > > RMC, England
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Having had an expensive lesson from Intel on 'solid' thermal
    compounds,
    > I'm very leery.
    >
    > Of course, Intel's boxed heatsink comes with their thermal pad
    already
    > stuck on there. When the P4 gets hot, it melts to fill everything in
    > like your product.
    >
    > Well, I was getting over heating on my P4 3.0 GHz HT. I noticed that
    the
    > heatsink fins were covered in dust. So, I opened it up and
    unstrapped
    > the heatsink. Then I pulled and had to pull hard. It came out, but
    with
    > the P4 still glued to the heatsink. That room temp, solid thermal
    pad
    > worked like construction adhesive.
    >
    > I was able to get them apart, but it took a bit. A few pins were
    bent,
    > but not off. So, I straightened them - carefully. Alas, something
    got
    > broken. I had to replace both the processor and the mobo. That was
    an
    > expensive lesson.
    >
    > Therefore, I will only be using thermal conductors that won't be
    glue
    > when and if I ever need to take them apart.
    >
    > Clyde
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > the P4 still glued to the heatsink. That room temp, solid thermal pad
    > worked like construction adhesive.

    > Therefore, I will only be using thermal conductors that won't be glue when
    > and if I ever need to take them apart.


    I know what you mean - the same thing happened to a friend of mine.
    However, the material that I am highlighting goes on as a very very thin,
    non-adhesive layer. In fact, one of the salient points is that it remains
    workable throughout its life and will not act as a glue.

    My original post is a little unclear when I talk about its thermal
    conductivity being 20% less. What I meant to imply (from the product's
    datasheet) is that its thermal resitstance is 20% less, i.e. the thermal
    conductivity is 20 % *better* than normal white paste.

    I need to now find out the thermal conductivity ofthe silver-loaded material
    so I can do some sums. Formy part, I plan on taking the stock SHF assembly
    off, cleaning the white compound off (that I used in place of the Intel TIM)
    and trying this new stuff. If the rsults get me lower temps, then that's
    that.

    I intend to play with other HSFs as a matter of course, including the new
    Thermaltake BigWater, which sounds very good VFM.

    Cheers

    RMC, England
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Dave

    > air circulation in the system itself. Yeah, 150F may be within normal
    > operating range, but as you can easily drop that temperature by a third,
    > why
    > wouldn't you?

    Yes, I am aware that additional cooling will further drop the temperatures.
    I was including the figures here as a reference to the fact that they are my
    reference point, from which I can determine any change in performance as a
    function of heatsink compound, all other factors remaining unchanged.

    There are a variety of additional factors which contribute towards CPU
    cooling and I am looking at those separately.


    RMC, England
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    JADE wrote:
    > 1 Question........... why did you remove the HS for just a 'blow out'
    > cleaning?
    >

    Stupidity.

    I was thinking "I'll vaccume that, but better take it out for the static
    problem." (I didn't have any canned air at the time.) In the future,
    I'll get some more canned air.

    Clyde
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