Antec Sonata PSU with AMD Athlon 64

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I bought an Antec Sonata case with 380 W PSU and will install an Athlon 64
in it. On reading up various docs in the AMD web site I saw that AMD thermal
engineers specify a PSU with bottom air intake as the desirable PSU for all
AMD processors. I have read through a lot of reviews of the Antec case - and
in some of the reviewers were running Opteron in the case - but nowhere I
could find anything regarding this.

By default the case comes with one 120 mm rear fan with the option to
attach a similar air-intake fan at the front. The 380W PSU has the air
intake opening at the end and not at the bottom as specified by the AMD
engineers. I do not plan heavy duty games and do not plan to overclock. So I
plan to run the default settings - i.e. no fan installed at the front.
Should I go for a different case with a different PSU? Or should this
suffice?

Any comments?

Thanks,
Shantanu Sen
5 answers Last reply
More about antec sonata athlon
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:00:06 +0000, Shantanu Sen while doing time wrote:

    > I bought an Antec Sonata case with 380 W PSU and will install an Athlon 64
    > in it. On reading up various docs in the AMD web site I saw that AMD
    > thermal engineers specify a PSU with bottom air intake as the desirable
    > PSU for all AMD processors. I have read through a lot of reviews of the
    > Antec case - and in some of the reviewers were running Opteron in the case
    > - but nowhere I could find anything regarding this.
    >
    > By default the case comes with one 120 mm rear fan with the option to
    > attach a similar air-intake fan at the front. The 380W PSU has the air
    > intake opening at the end and not at the bottom as specified by the AMD
    > engineers. I do not plan heavy duty games and do not plan to overclock. So
    > I plan to run the default settings - i.e. no fan installed at the front.
    > Should I go for a different case with a different PSU? Or should this
    > suffice?
    >
    > Any comments?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Shantanu Sen


    I have the SLK3700 which similiar design but better than the Sonata. But
    that design does keep the air around the psu fan and cpu warmer than a no
    name case I was using. So the cpu is running 4-6 degrees hotter than it
    was before moving it to the SLK case. Still a great case, easy to open,
    work on components and clean.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    So, the PSU that you had for the old case - was the inlet at the bottom
    instead of being at the opposite end of the outlet?


    "jaster" <jaster@home.net> wrote in message
    news:pan.2004.09.28.16.42.21.855294@home.net...
    > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:00:06 +0000, Shantanu Sen while doing time wrote:
    >
    > > I bought an Antec Sonata case with 380 W PSU and will install an Athlon
    64
    > > in it. On reading up various docs in the AMD web site I saw that AMD
    > > thermal engineers specify a PSU with bottom air intake as the desirable
    > > PSU for all AMD processors. I have read through a lot of reviews of the
    > > Antec case - and in some of the reviewers were running Opteron in the
    case
    > > - but nowhere I could find anything regarding this.
    > >
    > > By default the case comes with one 120 mm rear fan with the option to
    > > attach a similar air-intake fan at the front. The 380W PSU has the air
    > > intake opening at the end and not at the bottom as specified by the AMD
    > > engineers. I do not plan heavy duty games and do not plan to overclock.
    So
    > > I plan to run the default settings - i.e. no fan installed at the front.
    > > Should I go for a different case with a different PSU? Or should this
    > > suffice?
    > >
    > > Any comments?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Shantanu Sen
    >
    >
    > I have the SLK3700 which similiar design but better than the Sonata. But
    > that design does keep the air around the psu fan and cpu warmer than a no
    > name case I was using. So the cpu is running 4-6 degrees hotter than it
    > was before moving it to the SLK case. Still a great case, easy to open,
    > work on components and clean.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 16:43:15 +0000, Shantanu Sen while doing time wrote:

    > So, the PSU that you had for the old case - was the inlet at the bottom
    > instead of being at the opposite end of the outlet?
    >
    >

    Inlet at the opposite end of outlet.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I have one of these running with 4 hard drives it it. Seems okay.

    "Shantanu Sen" <sdsen@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:W%e6d.2328$JG2.10@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    > I bought an Antec Sonata case with 380 W PSU and will install an Athlon 64
    > in it. On reading up various docs in the AMD web site I saw that AMD
    thermal
    > engineers specify a PSU with bottom air intake as the desirable PSU for
    all
    > AMD processors. I have read through a lot of reviews of the Antec case -
    and
    > in some of the reviewers were running Opteron in the case - but nowhere I
    > could find anything regarding this.
    >
    > By default the case comes with one 120 mm rear fan with the option to
    > attach a similar air-intake fan at the front. The 380W PSU has the air
    > intake opening at the end and not at the bottom as specified by the AMD
    > engineers. I do not plan heavy duty games and do not plan to overclock. So
    I
    > plan to run the default settings - i.e. no fan installed at the front.
    > Should I go for a different case with a different PSU? Or should this
    > suffice?
    >
    > Any comments?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Shantanu Sen
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <W%e6d.2328$JG2.10
    @newssvr14.news.prodigy.com>, sdsen@pacbell.net says...
    > I bought an Antec Sonata case with 380 W PSU and will install an Athlon 64
    > in it. On reading up various docs in the AMD web site I saw that AMD thermal
    > engineers specify a PSU with bottom air intake as the desirable PSU for all
    > AMD processors. I have read through a lot of reviews of the Antec case - and
    > in some of the reviewers were running Opteron in the case - but nowhere I
    > could find anything regarding this.
    >
    > By default the case comes with one 120 mm rear fan with the option to
    > attach a similar air-intake fan at the front. The 380W PSU has the air
    > intake opening at the end and not at the bottom as specified by the AMD
    > engineers. I do not plan heavy duty games and do not plan to overclock. So I
    > plan to run the default settings - i.e. no fan installed at the front.
    > Should I go for a different case with a different PSU? Or should this
    > suffice?

    I'm running an Opteron 144 in a Sonata case with the
    default PSU. I moved the 120mm stock fan to the front
    (to draw air in over the hard drives) and installed an
    auto-speed 120mm fan for the exhaust port (speed adjusts
    based on temp). Using the stock heatsink/fan that comes
    with the Opteron 144 CPU.

    Everything has been working fine for me (gaming,
    creating PAR2 sets) for a few weeks, and the ambient
    temp in the office fluctates from 70F to 85F.

    The 120mm exhaust fan can move *a lot* of air, and if
    you're really worried you can always replace the PSU
    with a side-intake model.

    The only disadvantage of the Sonata vs the p160 case (my
    other favorite) is that the Sonata is smaller, which
    means you end up with a hotter interior (or need more
    air flow). All the components are also packed closer
    together, and the 3rd 5.25" bay can interfere with some
    motherboards if you try to put a "long" 5.25" device in.
    The temp gauges on the Antec p160 case are a nice bonus
    (as is the additional 5.25" bay).
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