Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question

Repair of CPU pins

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • CPUs
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 4:09:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hello,

I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party heatsink
and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old thermal
paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually
fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of tweezers!
(Ok I am a pratt)

Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new CPU.
:( 

However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
repair this CPU?

Thanks,
Shane

More about : repair cpu pins

October 29, 2004 4:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

if the pin is detached from the silicon chip it is toast
"no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
> Hello,
>
> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party
> heatsink and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old
> thermal paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It
> actually fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of
> tweezers! (Ok I am a pratt)
>
> Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new
> CPU. :( 
>
> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else)
> to repair this CPU?
>
> Thanks,
> Shane
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 4:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else)
> to
> repair this CPU?
>

Its not economical to re-attach the pin. Learn from yor mistakes... dont
rush when playing with £160 CPU's

beter luck next time, eh

hamman
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
October 29, 2004 4:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...
> Hello,
>
> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party heatsink
> and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old thermal
> paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually
> fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of tweezers!
> (Ok I am a pratt)
>
> Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new CPU.
> :( 
>
> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
> repair this CPU?
>
> Thanks,
> Shane

Hi,

The spaces between CPU pins are too small to manually solder the pin
back (possible but difficult with consummer soldering tool). You can
try your local hardware/electronics store for a tube of cold soldering
liquid/paste. With a needle try to put some of that stuff on the CPU
where the missing pin is and put the original pin back. Haven't try
it on a CPU but used that stuff on many applications where soldering
with soldering gun is not feasible.

Hope this would help.
October 29, 2004 4:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

no spam wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party heatsink
> and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old thermal
> paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually
> fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of tweezers!
> (Ok I am a pratt)
>
> Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new CPU.
> :( 
>
> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
> repair this CPU?
>
> Thanks,
> Shane
>
>

There are many pins on a processor chip that are common i.e. ground and
the power bus. If you broke the correct pin, your processor MIGHT still
work. Are you feeling lucky???
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 4:09:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
news:vUbgd.794862$Gx4.336064@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> There are many pins on a processor chip that are common i.e. ground and
> the power bus. If you broke the correct pin, your processor MIGHT still
> work. Are you feeling lucky???

Yeah, you could even look for the datasheet for your processor and see if
the pin is even used at all. Many times there are unused pins on ICs. If
it IS a used pin, and I had no money, I personally would try soldering it
back on.

Check the datasheet for your CPU for sure.

--Dan
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 4:09:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <ab57986.0410281134.240a63d0@posting.google.com>,
Phil <Phil_12345@hotmail.com> wrote:
>"no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...
>> Hello,
>>
>> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
>> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party heatsink
>> and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old thermal
>> paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually
>> fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of tweezers!
>> (Ok I am a pratt)
>>
>> Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new CPU.
>> :( 
>>
>> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
>> repair this CPU?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Shane
>
>Hi,
>
>The spaces between CPU pins are too small to manually solder the pin
>back (possible but difficult with consummer soldering tool). You can
>try your local hardware/electronics store for a tube of cold soldering
>liquid/paste. With a needle try to put some of that stuff on the CPU
>where the missing pin is and put the original pin back. Haven't try
>it on a CPU but used that stuff on many applications where soldering
>with soldering gun is not feasible.
>
>Hope this would help.


If you do manage to get the pin to stick and then plug the
CPU into the socket the pin may very likely stay in the socket
if you remove it. Then you'll have a brokec CPU _and_ a broken
motherboard.

bad idea.
--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 5:13:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...

> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working
> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new
> third party heatsink and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the
> process of cleaning the old thermal paste off the CPU, I
> inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually fell
> out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of
> tweezers!

> does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
> repair this CPU?

Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.

If the broken pin is an essential one, do not try to repair it with a
soldering gun (too hot) or cold soldering compound (doesn't work
well). You'll need some sort of jig to hold the broken pin in place
and use a needle tip iron or, more likely because of tight access, a
hot air soldering iron. There are special repair pins available that
look like tiny gold-plated thumbtacks and will give a much larger
soldering surface and are easier to hold in place, but I haven't
looked for them in over 10 years.

When straightening bent pins, use the narrowest needle nose pliers you
can find, and bend them back them very slowly to make cracking less
likely, first straightening the part of the pin farthest from the chip
package and gradually work your way closer to the package. You want
to straighten the pin in reverse order that it was originally bent,
sort of the way you're supposed to fix a dent in a fender. This
lessens the chance that the pin will snap off at the package.

I don't understand how cleaning the thermal grease from the CPU can
cause pins to bend because the socket holds the chip firmly in place
and protects the pins. This is why I rarely remove a CPU once I
install it.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 1:51:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Thanks to everyonefor your advice. I am usually careful when handling
computer components (from static electricity etc and physical handling),
however, as a previous post suggested, I have learnt from this rather costly
mistake, to take greater care when handling a CPU!

Regards,
Shane
"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Qadgd.14822$6q2.7093@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
> news:vUbgd.794862$Gx4.336064@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>> There are many pins on a processor chip that are common i.e. ground and
>> the power bus. If you broke the correct pin, your processor MIGHT still
>> work. Are you feeling lucky???
>
> Yeah, you could even look for the datasheet for your processor and see if
> the pin is even used at all. Many times there are unused pins on ICs. If
> it IS a used pin, and I had no money, I personally would try soldering it
> back on.
>
> Check the datasheet for your CPU for sure.
>
> --Dan
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 2:42:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"do_not_spam_me" <do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:101710fa.0410290013.701d5287@posting.google.com...
> "no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...

> Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
> type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.

I too will testify to the quality of his work. He fixed three Abit BE6II
mobos with bad caps and the one board I still have on site is still running
over a year later.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 29, 2004 4:19:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I sent a P4 2.4ghz to Homie and it was so bad that I couldn't see how anyone
could fix it. He did and it is still going on another system. It was
apparently not correctly seated when someone clamped down the P4 HS on it
and bent or destroyed approx. half of the pins. I highly recommend him and
his prices are really too low.

Ed

"do_not_spam_me" <do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:101710fa.0410290013.701d5287@posting.google.com...
> "no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...
>
>> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working
>> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new
>> third party heatsink and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the
>> process of cleaning the old thermal paste off the CPU, I
>> inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually fell
>> out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of
>> tweezers!
>
>> does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
>> repair this CPU?
>
> Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
> type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.
>
> If the broken pin is an essential one, do not try to repair it with a
> soldering gun (too hot) or cold soldering compound (doesn't work
> well). You'll need some sort of jig to hold the broken pin in place
> and use a needle tip iron or, more likely because of tight access, a
> hot air soldering iron. There are special repair pins available that
> look like tiny gold-plated thumbtacks and will give a much larger
> soldering surface and are easier to hold in place, but I haven't
> looked for them in over 10 years.
>
> When straightening bent pins, use the narrowest needle nose pliers you
> can find, and bend them back them very slowly to make cracking less
> likely, first straightening the part of the pin farthest from the chip
> package and gradually work your way closer to the package. You want
> to straighten the pin in reverse order that it was originally bent,
> sort of the way you're supposed to fix a dent in a fender. This
> lessens the chance that the pin will snap off at the package.
>
> I don't understand how cleaning the thermal grease from the CPU can
> cause pins to bend because the socket holds the chip firmly in place
> and protects the pins. This is why I rarely remove a CPU once I
> install it.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2004 4:26:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>From: do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me)

>Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
>type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.

Thanks for posting this and something to keep handy. I am going to be
installing a P4 but was just going to use artic silver 5 instead of the pad.
I've never installed a cpu before. Looking at the heatsink, it has a small
grayish square pad on it. I've been reading that it's better to remove the
heatsink pad and use the artic silver 5 instead. What do you think of what he
recommends here:

http://www.motherboardrepair.com/index.php?sec=hsadvice
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2004 9:22:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> I have an AMD 3500+ CPU that had been working on an Asus A8V motherboard.
> It was running a bit too warm so I decided to fit a new third party heatsink
> and fan (Thermalright XP120). In the process of cleaning the old thermal
> paste off the CPU, I inadvertantly damaged one of the pins. It actually
> fell out when I tried to bend it back into place with a pair of tweezers!
> (Ok I am a pratt)
>
> Anyway, I have resigned myself to the fact that I may have to buy a new CPU.
> :( 
>
> However, does anyone know if it is possible to get AMD (or someone else) to
> repair this CPU?
>
> Thanks,
> Shane

If it was me, I'd coat it with five-minute epoxy resin, and jam it
back into its hole, hoping that it would make contact at the base.
After all, what have you got to lose?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2004 5:52:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Bob Davis" <iclicknix@cox.net> wrote in message
news:Fxtgd.83336$cJ3.19699@fed1read06...
>
> "do_not_spam_me" <do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com> wrote in message
> news:101710fa.0410290013.701d5287@posting.google.com...
>> "no spam" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:<4180fd9f$0$21974$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>...
>
>> Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
>> type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.
>
> I too will testify to the quality of his work. He fixed three Abit BE6II
> mobos with bad caps and the one board I still have on site is still
> running over a year later.
>

Yea......that is another one of his specialties. He is as honest as anyone
could possibly be too. Good guy. He has to have great eyes to do the pin
replacement/repair.

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2004 5:56:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"PawsForThought" <darnit7@aol.comnolitter> wrote in message
news:20041029202604.04530.00003191@mb-m02.aol.com...
> >From: do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me)
>
>>Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
>>type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.
>
> Thanks for posting this and something to keep handy. I am going to be
> installing a P4 but was just going to use artic silver 5 instead of the
> pad.
> I've never installed a cpu before. Looking at the heatsink, it has a
> small
> grayish square pad on it. I've been reading that it's better to remove
> the
> heatsink pad and use the artic silver 5 instead. What do you think of
> what he
> recommends here:
>
> http://www.motherboardrepair.com/index.php?sec=hsadvice

I think he is talking about the P3 Coppermines in that article...not sure

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 30, 2004 6:26:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>From: "Ed Medlin" edmedlin@yahoo.com

>
>"PawsForThought" <darnit7@aol.comnolitter> wrote in message
>news:20041029202604.04530.00003191@mb-m02.aol.com...
>> >From: do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me)
>>
>>>Homie, the person who runs www.motherboardrepair.com, performs this
>>>type of repair and has a reputation for doing quality work.
>>
>> Thanks for posting this and something to keep handy. I am going to be
>> installing a P4 but was just going to use artic silver 5 instead of the
>> pad.
>> I've never installed a cpu before. Looking at the heatsink, it has a
>> small
>> grayish square pad on it. I've been reading that it's better to remove
>> the
>> heatsink pad and use the artic silver 5 instead. What do you think of
>> what he
>> recommends here:
>>
>> http://www.motherboardrepair.com/index.php?sec=hsadvice
>
>I think he is talking about the P3 Coppermines in that article...not sure
>
>Ed

Oh ok, thanks Ed.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 31, 2004 6:09:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

darnit7@aol.comnolitter (PawsForThought) wrote in message news:<20041029202604.04530.00003191@mb-m02.aol.com>...

> I am going to be installing a P4 but was just going to
> use artic silver 5 instead of the pad. I've never
> installed a cpu before. Looking at the heatsink, it has
> a small grayish square pad on it. I've been reading that
> it's better to remove the heatsink pad and use the artic
> silver 5 instead. What do you think of what he
> recommends here:
>
> http://www.motherboardrepair.com/index.php?sec=hsadvice

He says you have to do that to improve the cooling, not that you
always have to do that. However a retail boxed P4's warranty will be
voided if you use anything but the included heatsink and the thermal
material applied to it at the factory. Also the P4 gives the heatsink
a fairly broad base and has a secure clamping system, unlike Socket
370 (Pentium III) and Socket A (Athlon), where the heatsink may rock
on a 1/2" square and be held by just a few fragile plastic hooks on
the socket.

Some people worry too much about cooling, but once your cooling is
adequate it's pointless to lower the temperatures further, and efforts
to do so often end up doing more harm (broken hardware) than good.
Realize that hot for humans is not necessarily hot for hardware. On
the other hand don't mount the hard drives without at least 1/2" of
air space on top and bottom.