Corrupt Video Display

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hi, I'm building my first computer and of course, I've run into problem
on the first boot... :)

Here's my config:

Chaintech 7NIF2 Motherboard
AMD XP 2800+ Barton
PQI dual channel 512MB(2x256) PC2700
Video: NVIDIA nForce (onboard)

After assembling my motherboard and components, I booted for the first
time. The video output is garbled such that I can't read anything on the
display. Even thought the display is garbled, I can tell that these are
the normal "POST" messages.

I read other posts that said the 7NIF2 is picky with ram, so I just
purchased a Kingston 256MB PC2700 in hopes that might resolve my
problem, but it did not.

Does anyone have any suggestions for things to try?

Thanks,

--
Jeff
15 answers Last reply
More about corrupt video display
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson <jefft@threeputt.org> wrote:

    >Hi,

    Hey

    >I'm building my first computer and of course, I've run into problem
    >on the first boot...
    >Here's my config ...
    >After assembling my motherboard and components, I booted for the first
    >time ...
    >Does anyone have any suggestions for things to try?

    You might want to study the mainboard manual and make sure jumper settings,
    if any, are correct. If you don't have the manual, you can get it here
    online at your mainboard web page.

    http://www.chaintechusa.com/tw/eng/product_spec.asp?PISNo=15

    If you get frustrated, hunker down and remove everything except the bare
    minimum.
    .... CPU with heat sink and fan
    .... one stick of memory
    .... video card
    Keep it that way until you find the cause.

    At that point, if possible, start swapping parts. Try a different monitor.
    Try a different video card. Then either the mainboard or the CPU.

    Whatever you do to troubleshoot your new system, good luck.


    --
    If you do not have the original containers, you might want to place
    disassembled components on aluminum foil.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    John Doe wrote:
    >
    > You might want to study the mainboard manual and make sure jumper settings,
    > if any, are correct. If you don't have the manual, you can get it here
    > online at your mainboard web page.
    >
    > http://www.chaintechusa.com/tw/eng/product_spec.asp?PISNo=15
    >
    > If you get frustrated, hunker down and remove everything except the bare
    > minimum.
    > ... CPU with heat sink and fan
    > ... one stick of memory
    > ... video card
    > Keep it that way until you find the cause.
    >
    > At that point, if possible, start swapping parts. Try a different monitor.
    > Try a different video card. Then either the mainboard or the CPU.
    >
    > Whatever you do to troubleshoot your new system, good luck.
    >

    Hi, thanks for the input... I've tried the following:

    Unplug everything except monitor, one stick of memory (two different
    sticks tested), and the cpu and HSF. I even added a AGP video card to
    the motherboard and I still get garbled video output with either the
    onboard nForce2 or the AGP card that I added.

    Any other ideas?

    Thanks,

    --
    Jeff
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson <jefft@threeputt.org> wrote:
    >John Doe wrote:

    >> [see the prior post]

    >... I've tried the following:
    >Unplug everything except monitor, one stick of memory (two different
    >sticks tested), and the cpu and HSF. I even added a AGP video card to
    >the motherboard and I still get garbled video output with either the
    >onboard nForce2 or the AGP card that I added.
    >Any other ideas?

    Have you looked at the mainboard manual? By the way, always keep a hardcopy
    of mainboard manuals.

    Have you tried unplugging the computer and then clearing the "CMOS"? Your
    mainboard manual should show a jumper which does that.

    Do you know that the monitor is good?

    I think there's a BIOS setting which chooses between PCI and AGP video,
    however it should switch to whatever is installed.

    If you have a system speaker, you might hear beeps which can mean
    something. I have rarely if ever had enough trouble to pay attention to
    those. My current mainboard has a code system using four LEDs which signals
    what might be wrong.


    --
    You will get used to putting the pieces together. I enjoy designing my
    system over the years, one upgrade at the time.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    John Doe wrote:
    >
    > Have you looked at the mainboard manual? By the way, always keep a hardcopy
    > of mainboard manuals.
    >

    Yes, this is a brand new mainboard, so I have the doc that came with it.

    > Have you tried unplugging the computer and then clearing the "CMOS"? Your
    > mainboard manual should show a jumper which does that.
    >

    Yes, I followed the doc and set JP1 from pin 1-2 (normal) to pin 2-3
    (clear CMOS data), but the video output is still garbled.

    > Do you know that the monitor is good?
    >

    Yes, I've tried 3 different monitors now, all are working fine on other
    systems... My den looks like a monitor graveyard now, BTW... :)

    > I think there's a BIOS setting which chooses between PCI and AGP video,
    > however it should switch to whatever is installed.
    >

    There may be, but although I can enter the BIOS setup by pressing
    "delete" during POST, I can't read the screen, so I'm stuck...

    > If you have a system speaker, you might hear beeps which can mean
    > something. I have rarely if ever had enough trouble to pay attention to
    > those. My current mainboard has a code system using four LEDs which signals
    > what might be wrong.
    >

    I hear a single beep at POST time, which I believe is normal, but I
    can't read the POST messages to see if there's an error.

    Any other ideas??? I may just ask newegg for a RMA tomorrow and try again...

    Thanks,

    --
    Jeff
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson <jefft@threeputt.org> wrote:

    >Yes, I followed the doc and set JP1 from pin 1-2 (normal) to pin 2-3
    >(clear CMOS data),

    Did you put it back on pin 1-2?

    >but the video output is still garbled.
    >
    >> Do you know that the monitor is good?
    >
    >Yes, I've tried 3 different monitors now,
    >
    >> I think there's a BIOS setting which chooses between PCI and AGP
    >> video, however it should switch to whatever is installed.
    >
    >There may be, but although I can enter the BIOS setup by pressing
    >"delete" during POST, I can't read the screen, so I'm stuck...

    I doubt that the problem is a BIOS setting. If it's anything you can
    help, maybe it's a mainboard jumper.

    >> If you have a system speaker, you might hear beeps which can mean
    >> something. I have rarely if ever had enough trouble to pay attention
    >> to those. My current mainboard has a code system using four LEDs
    >> which signals what might be wrong.
    >
    >I hear a single beep at POST time, which I believe is normal,

    Right. I think error signals are repetitive.

    >but I can't read the POST messages to see if there's an error.
    >
    >Any other ideas???

    The first time, did you put the memory in the outside slots? For dual
    channel mode, one must be installed in DDR3. Also, it says to use a
    video card for dual channel mode. That stuff is a bad lead IMO since
    dual channel mode is not necessary and one 256MB memory module should be
    plenty.

    If it has a TV out connector, I guess you could try that. Otherwise the
    only thing I can think of is like a jumper for serving front side bus
    (FSB) speed.

    The only other thing I can imagine is that it isn't using the onboard
    video without being set up, and the default is PCI and it will not
    automatically switch to AGP. In other words, it wouldn't hurt to try a
    PCI card if you had one.

    Seems to me that no video is the more likely symptom for something that
    you can correct.

    Have you tried adjusting the monitor settings?

    >I may just ask newegg for a RMA tomorrow and try again...

    Unless it can wait.

    Seems to me you are doing everything right. It usually isn't so
    difficult, I am curious to hear how it turns out.

    Sorry in advance.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    John Doe wrote:
    >
    > Did you put it back on pin 1-2?
    >
    >

    Yes, after waiting for 5 seconds as stated in the mainboard doc.

    >
    > I doubt that the problem is a BIOS setting. If it's anything you can
    > help, maybe it's a mainboard jumper.
    >
    >

    I've reviewed all of the mainboard jumpers, the only one that seems like
    it should help is JP25 (setup CPU, FSB, Freq. Jumper). Pin 1-2
    (default) is 133/166/200 MHz and pin 2-3 is 100 MHz. I have tested both
    settings, but no change detected.

    >
    > The first time, did you put the memory in the outside slots? For dual
    > channel mode, one must be installed in DDR3. Also, it says to use a
    > video card for dual channel mode. That stuff is a bad lead IMO since
    > dual channel mode is not necessary and one 256MB memory module should be
    > plenty.
    >

    Yes, the mainboard doc says you can install the memory in any slot,
    however, if you want to use dual channel, then one *must* be installed
    in slot 3. My first attempt was slots 1, 3, but I think I've tested all
    combinations, as well as just a single memory module.

    > If it has a TV out connector, I guess you could try that. Otherwise the
    > only thing I can think of is like a jumper for serving front side bus
    > (FSB) speed.
    >

    There is a TV out connector, I'll have to haul everything over to the
    TV, but I'll give it a shot... :)

    > The only other thing I can imagine is that it isn't using the onboard
    > video without being set up, and the default is PCI and it will not
    > automatically switch to AGP. In other words, it wouldn't hurt to try a
    > PCI card if you had one.
    >
    > Seems to me that no video is the more likely symptom for something that
    > you can correct.
    >

    Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.

    > Have you tried adjusting the monitor settings?
    >
    >

    Yes, and the three monitors I have tested with are all working on other
    computers in my home.

    >
    > Unless it can wait.
    >

    I'm pissed, but I'm not saving lives here, so it can wait... :)

    > Seems to me you are doing everything right. It usually isn't so
    > difficult, I am curious to hear how it turns out.
    >

    Thanks, I should have mentioned that I have a knack for breaking things
    when nobody else can. Comes in real handy writing code, since my ability
    to break things during testing eliminates a lot of bugs that many others
    wouldn't catch...

    In this case, however, it's driving me crazy. I'm just plugging in
    components and it should work!!! :)

    Thanks for your help.

    --
    Jeff
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson wrote:

    <snip>
    >
    >
    > Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    > random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    > recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    > displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    >

    Ah. A description of what 'garbled' meant.

    That's either a bad on-board display controller, or a memory problem, or
    something fouling the bus. It's outputting but the data is messed up.

    Remove all PCI cards, if you haven't already.

    I know you said you tried different memory sockets but try again, with just
    one.

    I'd also try the 100 FSB jumper. If that gets a readable display then see
    what it's defaulting to for the memory. Maybe its misreading the SPD and
    setting the timings too high.

    This may sound odd but double check your processor heatsink. I've seen
    misapplied heatsinks that let the processor overheat so it acts erratically
    and, yes, 'sorta' try to put up the post and BIOS screens, but splattered
    with weird characters.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    David Maynard wrote:
    > Jeff Thompson wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    >> random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    >> recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    >> displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    >>
    >
    > Ah. A description of what 'garbled' meant.
    >

    hehe... It's hard to describe the screen, so I've taken two pictures
    with a digital camera to show the screen when the system is powered on
    and the screen immediately following the POST beep. I'm not sure what
    the policy is for attaching binary images to this newsgroup's posts, so
    I've uploaded the pictures to:

    http://threeputt.org/images/poweron.jpg
    http://threeputt.org/images/post.jpg

    > That's either a bad on-board display controller, or a memory problem, or
    > something fouling the bus. It's outputting but the data is messed up.
    >
    > Remove all PCI cards, if you haven't already.
    >

    There are no PCI or AGP cards installed. I did install an AGP card to
    see if the problem was strictly with the onboard graphics, but the
    screen output was still garbled as shown in the pictures.

    > I know you said you tried different memory sockets but try again, with
    > just one.
    >

    I believe I've tried all the memory sticks in all combinations of the
    three slots.

    > I'd also try the 100 FSB jumper. If that gets a readable display then
    > see what it's defaulting to for the memory. Maybe its misreading the SPD
    > and setting the timings too high.
    >

    I did try setting the jumper to 100 FSB, but it does not appear to help.

    > This may sound odd but double check your processor heatsink. I've seen
    > misapplied heatsinks that let the processor overheat so it acts
    > erratically and, yes, 'sorta' try to put up the post and BIOS screens,
    > but splattered with weird characters.
    >

    Visual inspection looks like it's mounted ok to me. The video problem
    occurred on the first power-on, so unless the CPU can overheat in the
    1-2 seconds it takes to POST, I don't think this is the problem, but
    thanks for the suggestion.

    Thanks,

    --
    Jeff
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    >random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    >recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    >displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.

    try reflash the MoBo Bios, if that do not help if flashing passes,
    IMHO the chipset is toasted so its time to replace the MoBo ...
    --
    Regards, SPAJKY ®
    & visit my site @ http://www.spajky.vze.com
    "Tualatin OC-ed / BX-Slot1 / inaudible setup!"
    E-mail AntiSpam: remove ##
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Spajky wrote:
    >>Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    >>random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    >>recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    >>displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    >
    >
    > try reflash the MoBo Bios, if that do not help if flashing passes,
    > IMHO the chipset is toasted so its time to replace the MoBo ...

    I'll see if I can do this as a last resort... I don't have a floppy in
    this system and even if I cobble together a bootable CD-ROM with the
    flash update program on it, I'd be doing the flash upgrade blind, since
    the video output is unreadable...

    Thanks,

    --
    Jeff
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    memory stick is bad or memory timings are off

    "Jeff Thompson" <jefft@threeputt.org> wrote in message
    news:N82id.23756$T_.7187@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
    > David Maynard wrote:
    > > Jeff Thompson wrote:
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's
    just a
    > >> random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    > >> recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora
    graphic
    > >> displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still
    unreadable.
    > >>
    > >
    > > Ah. A description of what 'garbled' meant.
    > >
    >
    > hehe... It's hard to describe the screen, so I've taken two pictures
    > with a digital camera to show the screen when the system is powered
    on
    > and the screen immediately following the POST beep. I'm not sure
    what
    > the policy is for attaching binary images to this newsgroup's posts,
    so
    > I've uploaded the pictures to:
    >
    > http://threeputt.org/images/poweron.jpg
    > http://threeputt.org/images/post.jpg
    >
    > > That's either a bad on-board display controller, or a memory
    problem, or
    > > something fouling the bus. It's outputting but the data is messed
    up.
    > >
    > > Remove all PCI cards, if you haven't already.
    > >
    >
    > There are no PCI or AGP cards installed. I did install an AGP card
    to
    > see if the problem was strictly with the onboard graphics, but the
    > screen output was still garbled as shown in the pictures.
    >
    > > I know you said you tried different memory sockets but try again,
    with
    > > just one.
    > >
    >
    > I believe I've tried all the memory sticks in all combinations of
    the
    > three slots.
    >
    > > I'd also try the 100 FSB jumper. If that gets a readable display
    then
    > > see what it's defaulting to for the memory. Maybe its misreading
    the SPD
    > > and setting the timings too high.
    > >
    >
    > I did try setting the jumper to 100 FSB, but it does not appear to
    help.
    >
    > > This may sound odd but double check your processor heatsink. I've
    seen
    > > misapplied heatsinks that let the processor overheat so it acts
    > > erratically and, yes, 'sorta' try to put up the post and BIOS
    screens,
    > > but splattered with weird characters.
    > >
    >
    > Visual inspection looks like it's mounted ok to me. The video
    problem
    > occurred on the first power-on, so unless the CPU can overheat in
    the
    > 1-2 seconds it takes to POST, I don't think this is the problem, but
    > thanks for the suggestion.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > Jeff
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson <jefft@threeputt.org> wrote:
    >Spajky wrote:

    >>>Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    >>>random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    >>>recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    >>>displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    >>
    >> try reflash the MoBo Bios, if that do not help if flashing passes,
    >> IMHO the chipset is toasted so its time to replace the MoBo ...
    >
    >I'll see if I can do this as a last resort...

    And only if you are not interested in returning it to the seller.

    Others here can correct me if I'm wrong, but warrantee-voiding bells go
    off with that suggestion.

    >I don't have a floppy in
    >this system and even if I cobble together a bootable CD-ROM with the
    >flash update program on it, I'd be doing the flash upgrade blind, since
    >the video output is unreadable...

    DING DING DING DING

    Good luck.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I don't have a clue to what's going on, but deciphering those pics was easy:

    Poweron.jpg shows VGA adapter/card info (does nForce display this?)
    Post.jpg is simply post screen.

    I'd go for either a shot nForce chip or a defective VGA connection


    --
    Tumppi
    Reply to group
    =================================================
    Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
    Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
    (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
    =================================================


    "Jeff Thompson" <jefft@threeputt.org> kirjoitti viestissä
    news:N82id.23756$T_.7187@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
    > David Maynard wrote:
    > > Jeff Thompson wrote:
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just a
    > >> random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    > >> recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    > >> displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    > >>
    > >
    > > Ah. A description of what 'garbled' meant.
    > >
    >
    > hehe... It's hard to describe the screen, so I've taken two pictures
    > with a digital camera to show the screen when the system is powered on
    > and the screen immediately following the POST beep. I'm not sure what
    > the policy is for attaching binary images to this newsgroup's posts, so
    > I've uploaded the pictures to:
    >
    > http://threeputt.org/images/poweron.jpg
    > http://threeputt.org/images/post.jpg
    >
    > > That's either a bad on-board display controller, or a memory problem, or
    > > something fouling the bus. It's outputting but the data is messed up.
    > >
    > > Remove all PCI cards, if you haven't already.
    > >
    >
    > There are no PCI or AGP cards installed. I did install an AGP card to
    > see if the problem was strictly with the onboard graphics, but the
    > screen output was still garbled as shown in the pictures.
    >
    > > I know you said you tried different memory sockets but try again, with
    > > just one.
    > >
    >
    > I believe I've tried all the memory sticks in all combinations of the
    > three slots.
    >
    > > I'd also try the 100 FSB jumper. If that gets a readable display then
    > > see what it's defaulting to for the memory. Maybe its misreading the SPD
    > > and setting the timings too high.
    > >
    >
    > I did try setting the jumper to 100 FSB, but it does not appear to help.
    >
    > > This may sound odd but double check your processor heatsink. I've seen
    > > misapplied heatsinks that let the processor overheat so it acts
    > > erratically and, yes, 'sorta' try to put up the post and BIOS screens,
    > > but splattered with weird characters.
    > >
    >
    > Visual inspection looks like it's mounted ok to me. The video problem
    > occurred on the first power-on, so unless the CPU can overheat in the
    > 1-2 seconds it takes to POST, I don't think this is the problem, but
    > thanks for the suggestion.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > Jeff
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Jeff Thompson wrote:

    > David Maynard wrote:
    >
    >> Jeff Thompson wrote:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps I should clarify... I get something displayed, but it's just
    >>> a random bunch of characters, symbols, etc. instead of anything
    >>> recognizable. If I boot off of the Fedora DVD, I get a Fedora graphic
    >>> displayed (overlapped and incomplete) and all text is still unreadable.
    >>>
    >>
    >> Ah. A description of what 'garbled' meant.
    >>
    >
    > hehe... It's hard to describe the screen, so I've taken two pictures
    > with a digital camera to show the screen when the system is powered on
    > and the screen immediately following the POST beep. I'm not sure what
    > the policy is for attaching binary images to this newsgroup's posts, so
    > I've uploaded the pictures to:
    >
    > http://threeputt.org/images/poweron.jpg
    > http://threeputt.org/images/post.jpg
    >
    >> That's either a bad on-board display controller, or a memory problem,
    >> or something fouling the bus. It's outputting but the data is messed up.
    >>
    >> Remove all PCI cards, if you haven't already.
    >>
    >
    > There are no PCI or AGP cards installed. I did install an AGP card to
    > see if the problem was strictly with the onboard graphics, but the
    > screen output was still garbled as shown in the pictures.

    Well, then the one thing it isn't is the on-board graphics.


    >> I know you said you tried different memory sockets but try again, with
    >> just one.
    >>
    >
    > I believe I've tried all the memory sticks in all combinations of the
    > three slots.
    >
    >> I'd also try the 100 FSB jumper. If that gets a readable display then
    >> see what it's defaulting to for the memory. Maybe its misreading the
    >> SPD and setting the timings too high.
    >>
    >
    > I did try setting the jumper to 100 FSB, but it does not appear to help.
    >
    >> This may sound odd but double check your processor heatsink. I've seen
    >> misapplied heatsinks that let the processor overheat so it acts
    >> erratically and, yes, 'sorta' try to put up the post and BIOS screens,
    >> but splattered with weird characters.
    >>
    >
    > Visual inspection looks like it's mounted ok to me. The video problem
    > occurred on the first power-on, so unless the CPU can overheat in the
    > 1-2 seconds it takes to POST, I don't think this is the problem, but
    > thanks for the suggestion.

    A bare die will reach catastrophic temperatures in less than half a second.
    Of course, it shouldn't be 'bare' with a heatsink on it but if the thing is
    cocked, or installed backwards (which will cause it to cock), or the
    protective cover sheet was left on the pad, it can get real hot real quick.
    And, btw, the heatsink will be cool because the heat flow isn't getting to it.

    This really could be just about anything since just about anything can foul
    the data busses, including a mounting problem that leaves the mobo shorted
    to something in the case.

    Unfortunately, you don't appear to have a second system to test individual
    components in so it's shooting in the dark. At this stage I'd take the
    entire thing apart, including dismounting the heatsink and removing the CPU
    and do a visual on all parts. Look for bent pins, dirt (and thermal
    compound) on pins, scratch marks, and anything else that looks out of the
    ordinary. A 'missing' screw that went 'clink' during install but never
    found. A jumper that inadvertently got knocked off. Motherboard support
    post in the wrong place. Component knocked loose (like a cap bent off on
    one end), especially around the CPU and memory sockets. Etc.

    Then do a minimal setup outside the case, mobo, mem, CPU (no CDs, hard
    drives, floppies, or anything else) to eliminate case mounting problems.

    After all, if it's going to get RMA'd it's going to be removed anyway.

    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > Jeff
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I wrote:

    >I think there's a BIOS setting which chooses between PCI and AGP video,
    >however it should switch to whatever is installed.

    I might be wrong there. After clearing the CMOS BIOS, you might need to
    install a PCI video card, enter BIOS setup, select AGP first, reboot
    (maybe to the PCI card BIOS setup screen, but double check to see the AGP
    is still primary), turn off the machine, and then install the AGP card. If
    you are using the built in video, you might be able to do the same except
    set up that instead of the AGP.


    --
    If the original author has already delt with the problem, this is for
    posterity.
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