A Couple of Locomotion Questions

Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

I'm sorry to start yet another thread about Locomotion. I have
two questions. Two things that bug me about Transport Tycoon
are:
1. the dire track-laying algorithm that the computer controlled
companies use.
2. the over simplistic routing algorithm which causes trains to
easily get lost on complex networks.

So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
possibility of them getting lost en route?

TIA

Mike
--
Mike Humberston
WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not oblivion.
NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group, please.
8 answers Last reply
More about couple locomotion questions
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    A full-hearted "Mwa-ha-ha!!!" would be a suitable answer for both your
    questions :)

    "Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    news:ql1gn0pnsfapavbq9au6vitldm8m6eutod@4ax.com...
    > I'm sorry to start yet another thread about Locomotion. I have
    > two questions. Two things that bug me about Transport Tycoon
    > are:
    > 1. the dire track-laying algorithm that the computer controlled
    > companies use.
    > 2. the over simplistic routing algorithm which causes trains to
    > easily get lost on complex networks.
    >
    > So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    > take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    > 1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    > 2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    > possibility of them getting lost en route?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Mike
    > --
    > Mike Humberston
    > WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not
    oblivion.
    > NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group,
    please.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    >"Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    >news:ql1gn0pnsfapavbq9au6vitldm8m6eutod@4ax.com...
    >> I'm sorry to start yet another thread about Locomotion. I have
    >> two questions. Two things that bug me about Transport Tycoon
    >> are:
    >> 1. the dire track-laying algorithm that the computer controlled
    >> companies use.
    >> 2. the over simplistic routing algorithm which causes trains to
    >> easily get lost on complex networks.
    >>
    >> So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    >> take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    >> 1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    >> 2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    >> possibility of them getting lost en route?

    "Ark" <batis2ta@ineonet.net> wrote:

    >A full-hearted "Mwa-ha-ha!!!" would be a suitable answer for both your
    >questions :)

    Should I take that to mean no? If so then that is a pity as
    doing both those things is not particularly difficult.

    --
    Mike Humberston
    WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not oblivion.
    NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group, please.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    "Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    news:38jgn0ts7cdp44aba42lkc4kpmala0iou4@4ax.com...
    >
    >>"Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    >>news:ql1gn0pnsfapavbq9au6vitldm8m6eutod@4ax.com...
    >>> I'm sorry to start yet another thread about Locomotion. I have
    >>> two questions. Two things that bug me about Transport Tycoon
    >>> are:
    >>> 1. the dire track-laying algorithm that the computer controlled
    >>> companies use.
    >>> 2. the over simplistic routing algorithm which causes trains to
    >>> easily get lost on complex networks.
    >>>
    >>> So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    >>> take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    >>> 1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    >>> 2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    >>> possibility of them getting lost en route?
    >
    > "Ark" <batis2ta@ineonet.net> wrote:
    >
    >>A full-hearted "Mwa-ha-ha!!!" would be a suitable answer for both your
    >>questions :)
    >
    > Should I take that to mean no? If so then that is a pity as
    > doing both those things is not particularly difficult.
    >
    > --
    > Mike Humberston
    > WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not
    > oblivion.
    > NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group,
    > please.

    I cant answer the question about the companies, but the competition in TTDLX
    were stupid as well. When setting a rail route, you can add waypoints at
    junctions to make the train or tram turn the correct way at points. This
    works OK here.

    Bob
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    "Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    news:38jgn0ts7cdp44aba42lkc4kpmala0iou4@4ax.com...
    >
    > >"Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote in message
    > >news:ql1gn0pnsfapavbq9au6vitldm8m6eutod@4ax.com...
    > >> I'm sorry to start yet another thread about Locomotion. I have
    > >> two questions. Two things that bug me about Transport Tycoon
    > >> are:
    > >> 1. the dire track-laying algorithm that the computer controlled
    > >> companies use.
    > >> 2. the over simplistic routing algorithm which causes trains to
    > >> easily get lost on complex networks.
    > >>
    > >> So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    > >> take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    > >> 1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    > >> 2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    > >> possibility of them getting lost en route?
    >
    > "Ark" <batis2ta@ineonet.net> wrote:
    >
    > >A full-hearted "Mwa-ha-ha!!!" would be a suitable answer for both your
    > >questions :)
    >
    > Should I take that to mean no? If so then that is a pity as
    > doing both those things is not particularly difficult.
    >
    > --
    > Mike Humberston
    > WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not
    oblivion.
    > NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group,
    please.

    Yes, you can take that as a resounding "NO" on both points.

    Take a peek at this screenshot:
    http://www.tt-forums.net/viewtopic.php?t=10621 to answer your first
    question. (Warning: large image)

    On point 2, although the ability to route trains through waypoints has been
    added, the path finding has not been improved at all.

    Other complaints:

    1. Still no easy way to upgrade trains.
    2. Vehicle reliability is worse and there is no way to regulate it. (i.e.
    increasing maintenance)
    3. No monorails or maglevs.

    Just my $.02.

    Ken
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    <Ken> wrote:

    >"Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> >"Mike Humberston" <oblivion@philomel.net> wrote:


    >> >> So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    >> >> take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    >> >> 1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    >> >> 2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    >> >> possibility of them getting lost en route?
    >>
    >> "Ark" <batis2ta@ineonet.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> >A full-hearted "Mwa-ha-ha!!!" would be a suitable answer for both your
    >> >questions :)
    >>
    >> Should I take that to mean no? If so then that is a pity as
    >> doing both those things is not particularly difficult.

    >Yes, you can take that as a resounding "NO" on both points.
    >
    >Take a peek at this screenshot:
    >http://www.tt-forums.net/viewtopic.php?t=10621 to answer your first
    >question. (Warning: large image)

    OMG! That really is dire.

    >On point 2, although the ability to route trains through waypoints has been
    >added, the path finding has not been improved at all.
    >
    >Other complaints:
    >
    >1. Still no easy way to upgrade trains.
    >2. Vehicle reliability is worse and there is no way to regulate it. (i.e.
    >increasing maintenance)
    >3. No monorails or maglevs.

    Thanks to you and Compfix for your replies. I just wish that
    Chris Sawyer was a rather (much) better programmer and took more
    trouble with the titles that he codes. I really don't know how
    he gets away with it.

    Mike
    --
    Mike Humberston
    WARNING: Spam trap in operation. Send any e-mail reply to mike, not oblivion.
    NOTE: E-mail currently inoperative. All replies to the news group, please.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    Mike Humberston wrote:
    >>>[...]
    >>>So my questions are, for Locomotion, has Chris Sawyer bothered to
    >>>take some time to research and implement algorithms which:
    >>>1. result in sensible computer controlled company track layouts?
    >>>2. get trains from starting point to destination without any
    >>>possibility of them getting lost en route?
    > [...]
    > Should I take that to mean no? If so then that is a pity as
    > doing both those things is not particularly difficult.

    I'm curious what routing algorithm you would choose. Granted, TTD's
    routing is not particularly smart, but the requirements are pretty
    specific: the algorithm must work in real time (it's called every time a
    train arrives at a junction, so that trains don't get stuck if the
    network is modified by the player) and require very little permanent
    storage (as opposed to temporary, which isn't a problem). And don't
    forget that the game was designed to run on a 386.

    (This doesn't mean I have no idea how to improve the existing algorithm,
    I'd probably have this already done if I weren't so busy on my PhD
    stuff. I've no idea how to design better routing from scratch, though.)

    --
    Marcin Grzegorczyk
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    Marcin Grzegorczyk wrote in message <2uc722F28fo8bU1@uni-berlin.de>...
    >
    >I'm curious what routing algorithm you would choose. Granted, TTD's
    >routing is not particularly smart, but the requirements are pretty
    >specific: the algorithm must work in real time (it's called every time a
    >train arrives at a junction, so that trains don't get stuck if the
    >network is modified by the player) and require very little permanent
    >storage (as opposed to temporary, which isn't a problem). And don't
    >forget that the game was designed to run on a 386.

    Indeed, the fact that the game continues to run on my lowly 75MHz machine
    even with the latest Patch is a testament to the resource efficiency of the
    programming.

    Ronnie
    --
    Volunteer guard on the Great Central Railway, Loughborough, Leicestershire
    Visit the world's only double track preserved steam railway!
    http://www.gcrailway.co.uk
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.microprose.transport-tyc (More info?)

    Alan Clucas wrote:
    > Marcin Grzegorczyk wrote:
    >> [...] Granted, TTD's
    >> routing is not particularly smart, but the requirements are pretty
    >> specific: the algorithm must work in real time (it's called every time
    >> a train arrives at a junction, so that trains don't get stuck if the
    >> network is modified by the player) and require very little permanent
    >> storage (as opposed to temporary, which isn't a problem). And don't
    >> forget that the game was designed to run on a 386.
    >
    > I'm not sure that Locomotion does this. I think it calculates the
    > routing in advance and runs that route for a while. For instance add in
    > a shortcut and trains will not start taking it straight away, but later
    > will always take it - so I guess it already knows where it is going.

    Hah. Then I'm not surprised if routing in Locomotion is even worse than
    in TTD, since it probably has to be fast enough to compute the entire
    route at once (as opposed to TTD's approach of looking only a couple of
    junctions ahead).

    (Mind that I haven't even seen Locomotion running, yet.)

    --
    Marcin Grzegorczyk
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