Lexmark printer X5250 . . . check for spyware?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I found this posted on misc.consumers

The author refers to a data-mining program installed automatically with
Lexmark printer driver software. In the other ng, he's getting his ass
flamed off. I don't understand that reaction. If what he wrote is true,
and I owned this particular printer, I would want to KNOW that Lexmark was
spying on me. And if this IS true, I would be inclined NOT to purchase a
Lexmark printer. Not that I'd considered it anyway, but spyware would be a
solid reason to spend your money on a different brand, IMHO.

Anyway, I just was wondering if someone here in this ng happens to own this
particular printer. If so, can you verify the following? -Dave

(The following was NOT written by me):

Yes, Lexmark is now in the Spyware business!

Just the other day I purchased a new Lexmark X5250 All-in-one printer.
I installed it as per the instructions and monitored the install with
Norton as I do with all new software.

On reviewing the install log I noticed a program called Lx_CATS had
been placed in the c:\program files directory. I investigated and
found a data log and an initialisation file called Lx_CATS.ini.
Further investigation of this file showed that Lexmark had, without my
permission, loaded a Trojan backdoor on to my computer. Furthermore,
it is embedded into the system registry, so average users would likely
never know it was there and active.

This Lexmark Trojan was programmed to monitor my use of the printer by
way of data collected from two DLLs in the c:\program files\lexmark500
folder. The Trojan would then send information on printer usage,
including types of print activity, scanning activity, OCR activity
etc., back to a hidden URL at 30 day intervals.

The URL, www.lxkcc1.com, is identified as being owned by Lexmark.

When I called and spoke with Lexmark support, they denied all
knowledge of any such program, and suggested I had somehow been
infected by a virus. When I challenged them with the facts, they
ultimately aknowleged that this was indeed activity tracking software
that reported printer and cartridge use back to them for "survey"
purposes. Lexmark said that "no personal data" was relayed by the
program, and that I could not be personally identified by it. However
- the program transmits the printer serial number, and when I
registered the warranty with Lexmark, they recorded my personal
information along with the serial number. How much effort does it take
to match the two?

I call it spying! I was not advised of this part of the installation,
nor was I asked to agree to be part of any such data gathering
activity. I see this as a breach of my privacy, and as deplorable
behaviour by Lexmark.

Lexmark users beware! But, they may not be the only ones stealing your
private information.
7 answers Last reply
More about lexmark printer x5250 check spyware
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    #1 firewall and nothing finds its way out...
    #2 During the install there is an accept this blah blah screen, almost
    every time. Clicking 'accept' without reading, is a MOF these days.
    #3 All hardware is going to be phoning home soon (HP-Epson ordering
    cartridges after detecting low ink, yeah right.) Opening the door to
    phoning home to find out if you have the 'right' to print whatever
    your printing.


    "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message
    news:2vcdsjF2gmjhlU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > I found this posted on misc.consumers
    >
    > The author refers to a data-mining program installed automatically
    with
    > Lexmark printer driver software. In the other ng, he's getting his
    ass
    > flamed off. I don't understand that reaction. If what he wrote is
    true,
    > and I owned this particular printer, I would want to KNOW that
    Lexmark was
    > spying on me. And if this IS true, I would be inclined NOT to
    purchase a
    > Lexmark printer. Not that I'd considered it anyway, but spyware
    would be a
    > solid reason to spend your money on a different brand, IMHO.
    >
    > Anyway, I just was wondering if someone here in this ng happens to
    own this
    > particular printer. If so, can you verify the following? -Dave
    >
    > (The following was NOT written by me):
    >
    > Yes, Lexmark is now in the Spyware business!
    >
    > Just the other day I purchased a new Lexmark X5250 All-in-one
    printer.
    > I installed it as per the instructions and monitored the install
    with
    > Norton as I do with all new software.
    >
    > On reviewing the install log I noticed a program called Lx_CATS had
    > been placed in the c:\program files directory. I investigated and
    > found a data log and an initialisation file called Lx_CATS.ini.
    > Further investigation of this file showed that Lexmark had, without
    my
    > permission, loaded a Trojan backdoor on to my computer. Furthermore,
    > it is embedded into the system registry, so average users would
    likely
    > never know it was there and active.
    >
    > This Lexmark Trojan was programmed to monitor my use of the printer
    by
    > way of data collected from two DLLs in the c:\program
    files\lexmark500
    > folder. The Trojan would then send information on printer usage,
    > including types of print activity, scanning activity, OCR activity
    > etc., back to a hidden URL at 30 day intervals.
    >
    > The URL, www.lxkcc1.com, is identified as being owned by Lexmark.
    >
    > When I called and spoke with Lexmark support, they denied all
    > knowledge of any such program, and suggested I had somehow been
    > infected by a virus. When I challenged them with the facts, they
    > ultimately aknowleged that this was indeed activity tracking
    software
    > that reported printer and cartridge use back to them for "survey"
    > purposes. Lexmark said that "no personal data" was relayed by the
    > program, and that I could not be personally identified by it.
    However
    > - the program transmits the printer serial number, and when I
    > registered the warranty with Lexmark, they recorded my personal
    > information along with the serial number. How much effort does it
    take
    > to match the two?
    >
    > I call it spying! I was not advised of this part of the
    installation,
    > nor was I asked to agree to be part of any such data gathering
    > activity. I see this as a breach of my privacy, and as deplorable
    > behaviour by Lexmark.
    >
    > Lexmark users beware! But, they may not be the only ones stealing
    your
    > private information.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "JAD" <Kapasitor@coldmail.com> wrote in message
    news:10p210edncjff1b@corp.supernews.com...
    > #1 firewall and nothing finds its way out...
    > #2 During the install there is an accept this blah blah screen, almost
    > every time. Clicking 'accept' without reading, is a MOF these days.
    > #3 All hardware is going to be phoning home soon (HP-Epson ordering
    > cartridges after detecting low ink, yeah right.) Opening the door to
    > phoning home to find out if you have the 'right' to print whatever
    > your printing.
    >

    #1 Most people don't even know what a firewall is. I can't count the
    number of computer users I've had to explain this term to, especially since
    the AOL software started checking for Anti-Virus and firewall software and
    reporting these as MISSING on the log-in screen.

    #2 You think Lexmark or anybody else is going to announce in the EULA that
    they are installing spyware on your computer?

    #3 If we are stupid enough to allow that to come to pass, we deserve what
    we get. If you don't buy hardware or software that supports such tactics,
    the companies that promote it will be out of business soon. -Dave
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message
    news:2vcf63F2hm5q5U1@uni-berlin.de...
    >
    > "JAD" <Kapasitor@coldmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:10p210edncjff1b@corp.supernews.com...
    > > #1 firewall and nothing finds its way out...
    > > #2 During the install there is an accept this blah blah screen,
    almost
    > > every time. Clicking 'accept' without reading, is a MOF these
    days.
    > > #3 All hardware is going to be phoning home soon (HP-Epson
    ordering
    > > cartridges after detecting low ink, yeah right.) Opening the door
    to
    > > phoning home to find out if you have the 'right' to print whatever
    > > your printing.
    > >
    >
    > #1 Most people don't even know what a firewall is. I can't count
    the
    > number of computer users I've had to explain this term to,
    especially since
    > the AOL software started checking for Anti-Virus and firewall
    software and
    > reporting these as MISSING on the log-in screen.
    >


    ignorance is no excuse, but it is every where. AOL is the biggest 'big
    brother' of all. They are positioning themselves, as the #1 government
    sanctioned provider.


    > #2 You think Lexmark or anybody else is going to announce in the
    EULA that
    > they are installing spyware on your computer?
    >

    Yes they do. In almost all cases ('creative' and AOL is a good one) if
    they installed something you agreed to it unknowingly. There should be
    a warning screen " You lazy jackass, you didn't even scroll the 5
    pages of eula + no click on the continuing 'link" that further
    explains the Attached eula and any addtions to the eula and the FAQ
    for the attached eula." Yet you clicked accept...we now own your
    family..

    > #3 If we are stupid enough to allow that to come to pass, we
    deserve what
    > we get. If you don't buy hardware or software that supports such
    tactics,
    > the companies that promote it will be out of business soon. -Dave
    >

    Already in the motion, and you wont have much of a choice if you like
    to be in the state -of -the art reahlm of technology. It will be
    slowly introduced as to not alarm, but it will become what it is
    intended to be. China is a big reason why this WILL happen.
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > Already in the motion, and you wont have much of a choice if you like
    > to be in the state -of -the art reahlm of technology. It will be
    > slowly introduced as to not alarm, but it will become what it is
    > intended to be. China is a big reason why this WILL happen.
    >>

    I'm not sure what you mean by your comment about China. Could you
    elaborate? -Dave
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    China is the #1 pirating country and has the tech to be so. makes
    millions on other peoples work. Rarely if at all, recognizes any
    country's copyright laws. Thusly propagating the 'NEED' as the GOV
    will put it, to enforce hardcoded copyright. Its all about money.
    WEIN!


    http://www.againsttcpa.com/what-is-tcpa.html


    "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message
    news:2vch8tF2hfrmbU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > > Already in the motion, and you wont have much of a choice if you
    like
    > > to be in the state -of -the art reahlm of technology. It will be
    > > slowly introduced as to not alarm, but it will become what it is
    > > intended to be. China is a big reason why this WILL happen.
    > >>
    >
    > I'm not sure what you mean by your comment about China. Could you
    > elaborate? -Dave
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 10:58:05 -0800, JAD wrote:

    > China is the #1 pirating country and has the tech to be so. makes
    > millions on other peoples work. Rarely if at all, recognizes any
    > country's copyright laws. Thusly propagating the 'NEED' as the GOV
    > will put it, to enforce hardcoded copyright. Its all about money.
    > WEIN!
    >
    >
    > http://www.againsttcpa.com/what-is-tcpa.html
    >
    >
    >
    > "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message
    > news:2vch8tF2hfrmbU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >>> Already in the motion, and you wont have much of a choice if you
    > like
    >>> to be in the state -of -the art reahlm of technology. It will be
    >>> slowly introduced as to not alarm, but it will become what it is
    >>> intended to be. China is a big reason why this WILL happen.
    >>>>
    >>
    >> I'm not sure what you mean by your comment about China. Could you
    >> elaborate? -Dave
    >>
    >>

    Fascinating! Absolutely fascinating! Not a single reply understood what
    the poster was saying. Fascinating! China? What the hell does that have
    to do with Lexmark installing spyware on a computer? Dave, walk away. You
    do not want to fool around with these cretins.
    --
    r.s.nevin@att.net
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I answered the OP, cretin...it was Dave who elaborated, cretin you
    walk away, cretin... new word of the day "cretin" brought to you by
    the letter "C" and Bob.


    > Fascinating! Absolutely fascinating! Not a single reply understood
    what
    > the poster was saying. Fascinating! China? What the hell does
    that have
    > to do with Lexmark installing spyware on a computer? Dave, walk
    away. You
    > do not want to fool around with these cretins.
    > --
    > r.s.nevin@att.net
Ask a new question

Read More

Homebuilt Lexmark Spyware Printers Systems