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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 10, 2004 12:32:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC. Everything was
fully operational, but later in the day of the installation, my friend
grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across the carpet to return it to its
proper location. When he did this, the power cut out. Subsequent attempts to
reboot the machine result in no signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch
screen. Since I have already attempted to run the machine on a different
power supply, I can rule this out and assume it is a failure of the
motherboard, cpu or memory (or a combination of these). Is my assumption
correct, that to get the initial BIOS screen you need a working motherboard,
cpu and memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not be an
issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the monitor.

Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to believe
that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is unlikely. However,
the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to assist him further. The
machine was running for hours just fine up until the time he slid the tower
across the carpet. Anyway, here are the problems - I have no way of knowing
with certainty which of the critical components is failing (motherboard, cpu
or memory). However, instinct tells me to start with the motherboard. I have
no way of testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a 3-4
year old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly replace.
What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to match them
to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard? My friend hasn't
the money or the will to replace his computer at this time. He just needs a
cheap fix to get him back to where he was. It just seems like locating
obsolete standalone motherboards for sale is not easy to pull off. CPU is an
AMD (not yet sure about the specs) and the memory module reads Centon
Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.

I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I will
resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future. Originally, I
just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to install, you'll figure
it out". At his urging, I did the deed for him. Stupid, and this is likely
to cause a rift in our friendship. He is nearly sold on the idea that it's
my fault.

More about : dead

November 10, 2004 4:30:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

turn on the wall switch that controls the outlet/turn on power strip


"SmarSquid" <smarsquid@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:v-CdnYnvnI6P3w_cRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
> I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC.
Everything was
> fully operational, but later in the day of the installation, my
friend
> grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across the carpet to return it
to its
> proper location. When he did this, the power cut out. Subsequent
attempts to
> reboot the machine result in no signal to the monitor and no BIOS
launch
> screen. Since I have already attempted to run the machine on a
different
> power supply, I can rule this out and assume it is a failure of the
> motherboard, cpu or memory (or a combination of these). Is my
assumption
> correct, that to get the initial BIOS screen you need a working
motherboard,
> cpu and memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not
be an
> issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the
monitor.
>
> Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to
believe
> that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is unlikely.
However,
> the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to assist him
further. The
> machine was running for hours just fine up until the time he slid
the tower
> across the carpet. Anyway, here are the problems - I have no way of
knowing
> with certainty which of the critical components is failing
(motherboard, cpu
> or memory). However, instinct tells me to start with the
motherboard. I have
> no way of testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a
3-4
> year old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly
replace.
> What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to
match them
> to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard? My friend
hasn't
> the money or the will to replace his computer at this time. He just
needs a
> cheap fix to get him back to where he was. It just seems like
locating
> obsolete standalone motherboards for sale is not easy to pull off.
CPU is an
> AMD (not yet sure about the specs) and the memory module reads
Centon
> Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.
>
> I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I
will
> resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future.
Originally, I
> just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to install, you'll
figure
> it out". At his urging, I did the deed for him. Stupid, and this is
likely
> to cause a rift in our friendship. He is nearly sold on the idea
that it's
> my fault.
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 10, 2004 4:38:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"SmarSquid" <smarsquid@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:v-CdnYnvnI6P3w_cRVn-3Q@comcast.com...
> I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC. Everything
was
> fully operational, but later in the day of the installation, my friend
> grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across the carpet to return it to
its
> proper location. When he did this, the power cut out. Subsequent attempts
to
> reboot the machine result in no signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch
> screen. Since I have already attempted to run the machine on a different
> power supply, I can rule this out and assume it is a failure of the
> motherboard, cpu or memory (or a combination of these). Is my assumption
> correct, that to get the initial BIOS screen you need a working
motherboard,
> cpu and memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not be an
> issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the
monitor.
>
> Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to
believe
> that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is unlikely. However,
> the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to assist him further. The
> machine was running for hours just fine up until the time he slid the
tower
> across the carpet. Anyway, here are the problems - I have no way of
knowing
> with certainty which of the critical components is failing (motherboard,
cpu
> or memory). However, instinct tells me to start with the motherboard. I
have
> no way of testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a 3-4
> year old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly replace.
> What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to match
them
> to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard? My friend hasn't
> the money or the will to replace his computer at this time. He just needs
a
> cheap fix to get him back to where he was. It just seems like locating
> obsolete standalone motherboards for sale is not easy to pull off. CPU is
an
> AMD (not yet sure about the specs) and the memory module reads Centon
> Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.
>
> I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I will
> resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future. Originally, I
> just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to install, you'll
figure
> it out". At his urging, I did the deed for him. Stupid, and this is likely
> to cause a rift in our friendship. He is nearly sold on the idea that it's
> my fault.
>
>
>

This is one of the main reasons I am thinking about getting out of this
business, too many people who are ignorant on the subject try to blame
things like this on "faulty parts I provided" or "bad installation on my
part" when the cause has really been under-rated or low quality power
supplies, their "tinkering" of things after I leave or some other totally
unrelated reason. I've likened it to this scenario...
Friend: "My car is out of gas, can you please help me?"
Me: "Sure, no problem, I'm glad to help a friend..." Off I go, fill my
spare can with gasoline and return.
Friend: "Could you pour it into my tank for me, I've never done this
before."
Me: "Sure, always glad to help."
Gas is in, car starts and off he goes happy to be on his way, I go home.
When I get home, there is a message..."Friend called, he said he now has a
flat tire and it's your fault because you put the gas in his tank."
Me: "Grrrrr..."
and so it goes.

I'll stop now and get to the point...
I agree with the other two replies, especially the one dealing with
static... Carpets are known to create ALOT of static and sliding anything
(like a computer) across it will cause it to be transferred, I remember
walking on carpet as a kid to zap my brotheres and sisters, who would of
course get me back, but rubbing our feet as we walkd always produced a much
better jolt that simply walking. Anyway, if the machine was working fine up
to that point, for a few hours yet, it isn't very likely to be faulty parts,
he has a better chance of winning a sweepstake... However, to be sure you
could go through the motions of testing everything first as suggested.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 10, 2004 5:58:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> I'd be sure his friend's intentions are good before messing any further.
> His friend slid it across carpet (any chance of static here as well as the
> case flex causing a short?) and killed it, but sounds like he's trying to
> scam a new computer out of the guy that posted here who was trying to
> help.

There's a chance of static, sure. But I think it's a slim chance. If the
case has any plastic on the exterior, then yes, it will collect static by
being dragged across the carpet. But where does it go from there? I havent
seen too many (any?) motherboards that physically touch the plastic parts of
a case. If the motherboard is connected to a metal part of the case
(likely), then the metal case is grounded to the power supply, which is
grounded to the wall (assuming it's plugged in).

In other words, it will definitely build up static, but it's not likely to
be damaged by that static. Generally, to cause harm, the static must
discharge itself through a vital component. The case building up a static
charge will not "shock" a vital component, as the electricity is going to
seek the easiest path to ground, and the case itself is grounded. -Dave
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 10, 2004 10:30:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

SmarSquid wrote:

> I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC. Everything was
> fully operational,

What you did is done and working. The system is operational. End of project
number 1.


> but later in the day of the installation, my friend
> grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across the carpet to return it to its
> proper location.

You're lucky you got this clue. The typical answer is "I didn't do
anything." Of course, it being in a different physical location is kind of
a clue too ;) 

> When he did this, the power cut out.

What does that mean? Power cord pulled out?

> Subsequent attempts to
> reboot the machine result in no signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch
> screen. Since I have already attempted to run the machine on a different
> power supply, I can rule this out and assume it is a failure of the
> motherboard, cpu or memory (or a combination of these). Is my assumption
> correct, that to get the initial BIOS screen you need a working motherboard,
> cpu and memory as a bare minimum?

And video card, yes.

> The video card (I think) can not be an
> issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the monitor.

Rash assumption. A blown DAC will feed a nice black signal.

> Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to believe
> that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is unlikely.

Very. Unless you left loose screws in the thing to rattle around when they
moved it.

> However,
> the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to assist him further. The
> machine was running for hours just fine up until the time he slid the tower
> across the carpet. Anyway, here are the problems - I have no way of knowing
> with certainty which of the critical components is failing (motherboard, cpu
> or memory). However, instinct tells me to start with the motherboard. I have
> no way of testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a 3-4
> year old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly replace.
> What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to match them
> to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard? My friend hasn't
> the money or the will to replace his computer at this time. He just needs a
> cheap fix to get him back to where he was. It just seems like locating
> obsolete standalone motherboards for sale is not easy to pull off. CPU is an
> AMD (not yet sure about the specs) and the memory module reads Centon
> Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.

Well, finding a replacement motherboard for an 'AMD' using DDR isn't that
hard. There are a number of places that sell 'older' parts at reasonable
prices.

But before you decide things are all fried I'd suggest removing all plug-in
parts and reseating them as they might not have been as 'gentle' in the
moving as one might think and it isn't unusual for something to get knocked
loose a bit. And, btw, video cards are notorious for 'bumping' loose on one
end. That's why they added the lock tab on the rear.

>
> I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I will
> resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future. Originally, I
> just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to install, you'll figure
> it out". At his urging, I did the deed for him. Stupid, and this is likely
> to cause a rift in our friendship. He is nearly sold on the idea that it's
> my fault.

You should remind him that it was working when your hands left it.
November 10, 2004 11:59:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <v-CdnYnvnI6P3w_cRVn-3Q@comcast.com>, smarsquid@hotmail.com
says...
> I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC. Everything was
> fully operational, but later in the day of the installation, my friend
> grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across the carpet to return it to its
> proper location. When he did this, the power cut out. Subsequent attempts to
> reboot the machine result in no signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch
> screen. Since I have already attempted to run the machine on a different
> power supply, I can rule this out and assume it is a failure of the
> motherboard, cpu or memory (or a combination of these). Is my assumption
> correct, that to get the initial BIOS screen you need a working motherboard,
> cpu and memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not be an
> issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the monitor.
>

I know this may seem silly, but have you tried a different cable?
--
Pete Ives
Remove All_stRESS before sending me an email
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 1:20:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Sorry for the ambiguity when I said the power cut out. To clarify, he claims
the system power kicked off whilst it was fully plugged in and he slid the
tower across the carpet. I have tried reseating all the components many many
times, tried an alternate known good power supply, and tried all of this
with minimum components connected. No luck at all. I didn't think to observe
keyboard activity when I start the system. I will do this and report back to
this post on my findings. I also tried an alternate power outlet with a
different power cord. No change in outcome.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 11:17:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

SmarSquid wrote:
> I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC.
> Everything was fully operational, but later in the day of the
> installation, my friend grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across
> the carpet to return it to its proper location. When he did this, the
> power cut out. Subsequent attempts to reboot the machine result in no
> signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch screen. Since I have already
> attempted to run the machine on a different power supply, I can rule
> this out and assume it is a failure of the motherboard, cpu or memory
> (or a combination of these). Is my assumption correct, that to get
> the initial BIOS screen you need a working motherboard, cpu and
> memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not be an
> issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the
> monitor.
>
> Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to
> believe that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is
> unlikely. However, the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to
> assist him further. The machine was running for hours just fine up
> until the time he slid the tower across the carpet. Anyway, here are
> the problems - I have no way of knowing with certainty which of the
> critical components is failing (motherboard, cpu or memory). However,
> instinct tells me to start with the motherboard. I have no way of
> testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a 3-4 year
> old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly replace.
> What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to
> match them to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard?
> My friend hasn't the money or the will to replace his computer at
> this time. He just needs a cheap fix to get him back to where he was.
> It just seems like locating obsolete standalone motherboards for sale
> is not easy to pull off. CPU is an AMD (not yet sure about the specs)
> and the memory module reads Centon Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.
>
> I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I
> will resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future.
> Originally, I just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to
> install, you'll figure it out". At his urging, I did the deed for
> him. Stupid, and this is likely to cause a rift in our friendship. He
> is nearly sold on the idea that it's my fault.

Unfortunately, cases like this are not that rare. Make it clear to him
several times that there is no way that installing a DVD could cause the
computer to go bang. Make sure that he fully understands what has happened
before proceeding. If he need clarification then tell him to take it to a
"professional". Then you can proceed in finding whats gone bang and he
either has to come up with the money for the replacement parts or go back to
reading books. I recently sold my computer that I built and had running for
a few years to my sister and she had it running for a couple of months and
then it "just went blank and wouldn't start" that was my fault until on
furthur questioning I found out she had opened the case and had given it a
really good clean out with a vaccuum cleaner. Fortunately for me she
understood that she had messed up and fortunately for her the video card was
the only thing that suffered in the end. She paid up for a GF4MX and
everyone is happy again.

I generally don't help people now. And those I do get a half an hour speech
before hand about their responibilies and my "all care no responsibility"
policy.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 11:17:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Faulty keyboard connection hasn't been mentioned?
Do the keyboard lights flash on bootup?
Check the power supply at the back of the monitor?
Gees......... check all connections..........


"cowboyz" <me@here.now> wrote in message
news:cmtpgu$aeo$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
> SmarSquid wrote:
> > I successfully installed a HP DVD+RW drive in my friend's PC.
> > Everything was fully operational, but later in the day of the
> > installation, my friend grabbed the PC tower and slid it back across
> > the carpet to return it to its proper location. When he did this, the
> > power cut out. Subsequent attempts to reboot the machine result in no
> > signal to the monitor and no BIOS launch screen. Since I have already
> > attempted to run the machine on a different power supply, I can rule
> > this out and assume it is a failure of the motherboard, cpu or memory
> > (or a combination of these). Is my assumption correct, that to get
> > the initial BIOS screen you need a working motherboard, cpu and
> > memory as a bare minimum? The video card (I think) can not be an
> > issue since it at least is feeding a "visibly blank" signal to the
> > monitor.
> >
> > Resolving the issue is now wrought with problems. My friend wants to
> > believe that the DVD drive killed his machine. I think that is
> > unlikely. However, the timing of it all leaves me feeling obliged to
> > assist him further. The machine was running for hours just fine up
> > until the time he slid the tower across the carpet. Anyway, here are
> > the problems - I have no way of knowing with certainty which of the
> > critical components is failing (motherboard, cpu or memory). However,
> > instinct tells me to start with the motherboard. I have no way of
> > testing the cpu or memory. Bad news - the motherboard is a 3-4 year
> > old OEM version from Abit and seems impossible to directly replace.
> > What can I do (with the specs from the CPU and memory in hand) to
> > match them to a different, yet compatible and available motherboard?
> > My friend hasn't the money or the will to replace his computer at
> > this time. He just needs a cheap fix to get him back to where he was.
> > It just seems like locating obsolete standalone motherboards for sale
> > is not easy to pull off. CPU is an AMD (not yet sure about the specs)
> > and the memory module reads Centon Electronics Inc 128MBDDR T153625.
> >
> > I need some advice in a big, big way. Through it all, rest assured I
> > will resist the urge to help out a friend this way in the future.
> > Originally, I just handed him the DVD drive and said "it's easy to
> > install, you'll figure it out". At his urging, I did the deed for
> > him. Stupid, and this is likely to cause a rift in our friendship. He
> > is nearly sold on the idea that it's my fault.
>
> Unfortunately, cases like this are not that rare. Make it clear to him
> several times that there is no way that installing a DVD could cause the
> computer to go bang. Make sure that he fully understands what has
happened
> before proceeding. If he need clarification then tell him to take it to a
> "professional". Then you can proceed in finding whats gone bang and he
> either has to come up with the money for the replacement parts or go back
to
> reading books. I recently sold my computer that I built and had running
for
> a few years to my sister and she had it running for a couple of months and
> then it "just went blank and wouldn't start" that was my fault until on
> furthur questioning I found out she had opened the case and had given it a
> really good clean out with a vaccuum cleaner. Fortunately for me she
> understood that she had messed up and fortunately for her the video card
was
> the only thing that suffered in the end. She paid up for a GF4MX and
> everyone is happy again.
>
> I generally don't help people now. And those I do get a half an hour
speech
> before hand about their responibilies and my "all care no responsibility"
> policy.
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 1:41:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Also check the power bar, assuming he is using one, to make sure it is
plugged in/turned on, could've been knocked in the move. Try something else
like a lamp in the bar to make sure it's working properly, sometimes the
reset button, again assuming it has one, needs to be reset.

AMD'r

"SmarSquid" <smarsquid@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:B8-dnd4PP7V0aA_cRVn-oA@comcast.com...
> Sorry for the ambiguity when I said the power cut out. To clarify, he
claims
> the system power kicked off whilst it was fully plugged in and he slid the
> tower across the carpet. I have tried reseating all the components many
many
> times, tried an alternate known good power supply, and tried all of this
> with minimum components connected. No luck at all. I didn't think to
observe
> keyboard activity when I start the system. I will do this and report back
to
> this post on my findings. I also tried an alternate power outlet with a
> different power cord. No change in outcome.
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 5:43:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

SmarSquid wrote:
>
> Sorry for the ambiguity when I said the power cut out. To clarify, he claims
> the system power kicked off whilst it was fully plugged in and he slid the
> tower across the carpet. I have tried reseating all the components many many
> times, tried an alternate known good power supply, and tried all of this
> with minimum components connected. No luck at all. I didn't think to observe
> keyboard activity when I start the system. I will do this and report back to
> this post on my findings. I also tried an alternate power outlet with a
> different power cord. No change in outcome.

My brother did the same thing a few years ago with his computer. The
sliding on the carpet caused his MB to fry. He now has the computer up
off of the carpet.

Bob
November 11, 2004 5:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

There is no way the simple installation of a DVD+RW will kill a PC, assuming
that nothing else was done. The most likely cause is a loose internal cable
or a loose add-on board (especially the video card). Of course some really
silly things can cause a PC to appear dead as well, such as the rear power
supply toggle switch being in the off position, or the power cable not being
plugged in. With amateurs, assume nothing.
!