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Wiping a dead hard drive

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 2:49:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hi, all

Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is deader
than a brick?

It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days before
the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
strangers.

By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....

Thanks!

Mike

More about : wiping dead hard drive

November 11, 2004 2:49:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

huge magnet
"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Hi, all
>
> Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
deader
> than a brick?
>
> It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
before
> the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
> sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> strangers.
>
> By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 4:16:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> huge magnet

lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.

> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
> news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> > Hi, all
> >
> > Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
> deader
> > than a brick?
> >
> > It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> > WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
> before
> > the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_
of
> > sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> > strangers.
> >
> > By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> > thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
> >
> > Thanks!
> >
> > Mike
> >
> >
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 7:59:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

The price of a replacement 60G harddrive is proly under $60 if you look
around. If the data is that sensitive, I would use the LLNL method of
removing the platters, and destroying them....just spring for a new drive
it's cheaper in the long run....

Mike W
"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Hi, all
>
> Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
deader
> than a brick?
>
> It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
before
> the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
> sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> strangers.
>
> By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 10:36:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message

>> huge magnet
>
>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.

I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I recall.
It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.



>
>> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
>> news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
>> > Hi, all
>> >
>> > Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
>> deader
>> > than a brick?
>> >
>> > It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
>> > WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
>> before
>> > the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has
_lots_
>of
>> > sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands
of
>> > strangers.
>> >
>> > By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running
it
>> > thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>> >
>> > Mike
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 11:16:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
>"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>
>>> huge magnet
>>
>>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>
>I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I recall.
>It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
>effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
>
>
>

No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.

I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.

If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual to
insure that the data can't be read.




--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
November 11, 2004 11:45:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

electromagnet

"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >
> >>> huge magnet
> >>
> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
> >
> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I recall.
> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
> >
> >
> >
>
> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
>
> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
>
> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual to
> insure that the data can't be read.
>
>
>
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> ----
November 11, 2004 1:13:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

A local radio station, even a campus one (where they might still be
using tape) will have a 10" x 10" x 6" grey box that resembles a very
heavy coffee pot warmer.

This is a "degaussing machine".

Run the HD over that a few times and I guarantee a complete wipe. <G>

Of course, if you are truly paranoid, whale on it with a ball peen
hammer afterwards and jam the rubbish into the treads of a bulldozer.

Should work.

R.

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 01:16:37 -0500, "MF"
<ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:

>
>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>> huge magnet
>
>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>
>> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
>> news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
>> > Hi, all
>> >
>> > Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
>> deader
>> > than a brick?
>> >
>> > It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
>> > WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
>> before
>> > the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_
>of
>> > sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
>> > strangers.
>> >
>> > By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
>> > thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>> >
>> > Mike
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 1:36:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <5807p0ha3n0hcl84gjf04n6f1obve92b9b@4ax.com>,
rhys <rhys@nospam.com> wrote:
>A local radio station, even a campus one (where they might still be
>using tape) will have a 10" x 10" x 6" grey box that resembles a very
>heavy coffee pot warmer.
>
>This is a "degaussing machine".
>
>Run the HD over that a few times and I guarantee a complete wipe. <G>
>
>Of course, if you are truly paranoid, whale on it with a ball peen
>hammer afterwards and jam the rubbish into the treads of a bulldozer.
>
>Should work.


Did you try it ? Could you format and reuse the disk, afterwords ?

What vintage disk ? It makes difference.





>
>R.
>
>On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 01:16:37 -0500, "MF"
><ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>
>>
>>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>>> huge magnet
>>
>>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>>
>>> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
>>> news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
>>> > Hi, all
>>> >
>>> > Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
>>> deader
>>> > than a brick?
>>> >
>>> > It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
>>> > WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
>>> before
>>> > the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_
>>of
>>> > sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
>>> > strangers.
>>> >
>>> > By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
>>> > thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>>> >
>>> > Thanks!
>>> >
>>> > Mike
>>> >
>>> >
>>>
>>>
>>
>


--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 2:49:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

unscrew it, take out the platter and destroy it. If it's sensitive you
probably don't want it ending up anywhere
"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Hi, all
>
> Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
> deader
> than a brick?
>
> It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
> before
> the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
> sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> strangers.
>
> By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 3:09:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>electromagnet
>

How big ?

I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.



>"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
>> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
>> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >
>> >>> huge magnet
>> >>
>> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>> >
>> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I recall.
>> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
>> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
>> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
>> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
>> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
>>
>> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
>> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
>>
>> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
>> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
>> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
>> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual to
>> insure that the data can't be read.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> ----
>
>


--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
November 11, 2004 3:09:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal recycling
yard would do the trick.


"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >electromagnet
> >
>
> How big ?
>
> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
>
>
>
> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >> >
> >> >>> huge magnet
> >> >>
> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
> >> >
> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I
recall.
> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
> >>
> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
> >>
> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual to
> >> insure that the data can't be read.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> ----
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> ----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 3:31:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <10p77oia560106e@corp.supernews.com>,
JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal recycling
>yard would do the trick.
>
>


And what makes you thing that ? Don't mistake the strength of the
magnetic field with the lifting ability of a magnet with a large
surface area, but moderate field intensity.

I think a medical MRI is the strongest magnet you'll find outside
an advanced physics lab.



>"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
>> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >electromagnet
>> >
>>
>> How big ?
>>
>> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
>>
>>
>>
>> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
>> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
>> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >> >
>> >> >>> huge magnet
>> >> >>
>> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>> >> >
>> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I
>recall.
>> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong gripping
>> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
>> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
>> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
>> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
>> >>
>> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
>> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
>> >>
>> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
>> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
>> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
>> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual to
>> >> insure that the data can't be read.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> >> ----
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> --
>> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> ----
>
>


--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
November 11, 2004 3:31:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Al your talking apples and oranges.... once that mag CONTACTS the surface of
the HD, it will be clean and a great magnet itself for awhile. Done deal
many times, just to screw around during my younger days.

No MRI experience and a tech would be a little harder to convince to use a
piece of equipment such as that, than a burley beer guzzling equipment
operator, and if I guess, like yourself, I would guess that a MRI will have
a dramatic effect on the HD.

"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cn07l8$5m8$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <10p77oia560106e@corp.supernews.com>,
> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal
recycling
> >yard would do the trick.
> >
> >
>
>
> And what makes you thing that ? Don't mistake the strength of the
> magnetic field with the lifting ability of a magnet with a large
> surface area, but moderate field intensity.
>
> I think a medical MRI is the strongest magnet you'll find outside
> an advanced physics lab.
>
>
>
> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >> >electromagnet
> >> >
> >>
> >> How big ?
> >>
> >> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
> >> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
> >> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
> >> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >> >> >
> >> >> >>> huge magnet
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find
one.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I
> >recall.
> >> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong
gripping
> >> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
> >> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
> >> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
> >> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
> >> >>
> >> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
> >> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
> >> >>
> >> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
> >> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
> >> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
> >> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual
to
> >> >> insure that the data can't be read.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> --
> >> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> >> ----
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> ----
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> ----
November 11, 2004 3:31:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

MF wrote:
> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>huge magnet
>
> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.

Take a hammer to it. Bang some nails through it etc.

--
Paul
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 4:21:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <10p798690jns5b3@corp.supernews.com>,
JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>Al your talking apples and oranges.... once that mag CONTACTS the surface of
>the HD, it will be clean and a great magnet itself for awhile. Done deal
>many times, just to screw around during my younger days.
>

But you didn't demagnetiize a modern hard disk.

The magnetic materials used to coat the platters of a modern hard disk
have an amazingly high figure of Coercivity. A disk head flys a few
millionths of an inch over the surface and generates a magnetic field
that is very powerfull, but only a few milionths of a square cm in
cross section.

Coercive force, Hc The demagnetizing force, measured in Oersteds
necessary to reduce the induction, B to zero after a magnet has
been previously saturated.

http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/magnet_university/glo...

If a magnetic field that string was, say, a square inche in cross
section it would yank you belt buckle off (if it was magnetic). MRI
machines can do things like that.






> No MRI experience and a tech would be a little harder to convince to use a
>piece of equipment such as that, than a burley beer guzzling equipment
>operator, and if I guess, like yourself, I would guess that a MRI will have
>a dramatic effect on the HD.
>
>"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:cn07l8$5m8$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> In article <10p77oia560106e@corp.supernews.com>,
>> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal
>recycling
>> >yard would do the trick.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> And what makes you thing that ? Don't mistake the strength of the
>> magnetic field with the lifting ability of a magnet with a large
>> surface area, but moderate field intensity.
>>
>> I think a medical MRI is the strongest magnet you'll find outside
>> an advanced physics lab.
>>
>>
>>
>> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
>> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >> >electromagnet
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> How big ?
>> >>
>> >> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
>> >> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
>> >> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>> >> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >>> huge magnet
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find
>one.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk drive. As I
>> >recall.
>> >> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a strong
>gripping
>> >> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >>
>> >> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk unless you
>> >> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any maybe not
>> >> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and touching the
>> >> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse it.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss track servo
>> >> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just take a
>> >> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the platters
>> >> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too. Physical
>> >> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private individual
>to
>> >> >> insure that the data can't be read.
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> --
>> >> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> >> >> ----
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> >> ----
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> --
>> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>> ----
>
>


--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
November 11, 2004 4:21:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I'm not going to get into the physics of the subject(alt.science).
Modern HD, what arbitrary year would you put on the beginning of the
'modern' HD? 1985 - 1995 - 2005

"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cn0aj2$322$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <10p798690jns5b3@corp.supernews.com>,
> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >Al your talking apples and oranges.... once that mag CONTACTS the
surface of
> >the HD, it will be clean and a great magnet itself for awhile. Done
deal
> >many times, just to screw around during my younger days.
> >
>
> But you didn't demagnetiize a modern hard disk.
>
> The magnetic materials used to coat the platters of a modern hard
disk
> have an amazingly high figure of Coercivity. A disk head flys a few
> millionths of an inch over the surface and generates a magnetic
field
> that is very powerfull, but only a few milionths of a square cm in
> cross section.
>
> Coercive force, Hc The demagnetizing force, measured in Oersteds
> necessary to reduce the induction, B to zero after a magnet has
> been previously saturated.
>
> http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/magnet_university/glo...
>
> If a magnetic field that string was, say, a square inche in cross
> section it would yank you belt buckle off (if it was magnetic). MRI
> machines can do things like that.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > No MRI experience and a tech would be a little harder to convince
to use a
> >piece of equipment such as that, than a burley beer guzzling
equipment
> >operator, and if I guess, like yourself, I would guess that a MRI
will have
> >a dramatic effect on the HD.
> >
> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >news:cn07l8$5m8$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> In article <10p77oia560106e@corp.supernews.com>,
> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >> >power / size well lets see...a visit to the local
wrecking/metal
> >recycling
> >> >yard would do the trick.
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> And what makes you thing that ? Don't mistake the strength of
the
> >> magnetic field with the lifting ability of a magnet with a large
> >> surface area, but moderate field intensity.
> >>
> >> I think a medical MRI is the strongest magnet you'll find outside
> >> an advanced physics lab.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >> >news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> >> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
> >> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
> >> >> >electromagnet
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> How big ?
> >> >>
> >> >> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
> >> >> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
> >> >> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
> >> >> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
> >> >> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
> >> >> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >> >> >> >
> >> >> >> >>> huge magnet
> >> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to
find
> >one.
> >> >> >> >
> >> >> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk
drive. As I
> >> >recall.
> >> >> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a
strong
> >gripping
> >> >> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
> >> >> >> >
> >> >> >> >
> >> >> >> >
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk
unless you
> >> >> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any
maybe not
> >> >> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and
touching the
> >> >> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse
it.
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss
track servo
> >> >> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just
take a
> >> >> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the
platters
> >> >> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too.
Physical
> >> >> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private
individual
> >to
> >> >> >> insure that the data can't be read.
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> --
> >> >> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> >> >> ----
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> --
> >> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> >> ----
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> >> ----
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
> ----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 5:38:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 12:31:34 +0000, Paul <paul.hill@[NOSPAM]clara.co.uk>
wrote:

>MF wrote:
>> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>huge magnet
>>
>> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>
>Take a hammer to it. Bang some nails through it etc.

Jeez -- why all of these violent solutions? Physical destruction is,
indeed, the only reliable way to ensure that the data is not recoverable
but that can also be accomplished by just taking the thing apart.
Salvage what's re-useable and use the rest for geek Xmas-tree ornaments.

--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 5:38:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hello over there in Norfolk from the Hampton side of the HRBT
November 11, 2004 5:48:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Or you could just drive your car over it. ;>)
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 6:01:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <10p7fa06bgbsbb3@corp.supernews.com>,
JAD <Kapasitor@coldmail.com> wrote:
>I'm not going to get into the physics of the subject(alt.science).
>Modern HD, what arbitrary year would you put on the beginning of the
>'modern' HD? 1985 - 1995 - 2005
>

I think cheap hard disk densities took off around 2000. IBM did lots
of the physics that makes these disks possible, and a google
search finds an IBM reasearch paper dated 1995. 5 years to market
is about right.

http://domino.research.ibm.com/tchjr
/journalindex.nsf/0/312fbbd32e8930bd85256bfa0067fb03?OpenDocument

http://makeashorterlink.com/?M23C142C9




>"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:cn0aj2$322$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> In article <10p798690jns5b3@corp.supernews.com>,
>> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >Al your talking apples and oranges.... once that mag CONTACTS the
>surface of
>> >the HD, it will be clean and a great magnet itself for awhile. Done
>deal
>> >many times, just to screw around during my younger days.
>> >
>>
>> But you didn't demagnetiize a modern hard disk.
>>
>> The magnetic materials used to coat the platters of a modern hard
>disk
>> have an amazingly high figure of Coercivity. A disk head flys a few
>> millionths of an inch over the surface and generates a magnetic
>field
>> that is very powerfull, but only a few milionths of a square cm in
>> cross section.
>>
>> Coercive force, Hc The demagnetizing force, measured in Oersteds
>> necessary to reduce the induction, B to zero after a magnet has
>> been previously saturated.
>>
>> http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/magnet_university/glo...
>>
>> If a magnetic field that string was, say, a square inche in cross
>> section it would yank you belt buckle off (if it was magnetic). MRI
>> machines can do things like that.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > No MRI experience and a tech would be a little harder to convince
>to use a
>> >piece of equipment such as that, than a burley beer guzzling
>equipment
>> >operator, and if I guess, like yourself, I would guess that a MRI
>will have
>> >a dramatic effect on the HD.
>> >
>> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >news:cn07l8$5m8$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> In article <10p77oia560106e@corp.supernews.com>,
>> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >> >power / size well lets see...a visit to the local
>wrecking/metal
>> >recycling
>> >> >yard would do the trick.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> And what makes you thing that ? Don't mistake the strength of
>the
>> >> magnetic field with the lifting ability of a magnet with a large
>> >> surface area, but moderate field intensity.
>> >>
>> >> I think a medical MRI is the strongest magnet you'll find outside
>> >> an advanced physics lab.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >> >news:cn06ce$qtc$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> >> In article <10p75qifle4dge5@corp.supernews.com>,
>> >> >> JAD <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote:
>> >> >> >electromagnet
>> >> >> >
>> >> >>
>> >> >> How big ?
>> >> >>
>> >> >> I'm not sure an MRI is powerfull enough.
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> >"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
>> >> >> >news:cmvonc$mj9$1@panix5.panix.com...
>> >> >> >> In article <Xns959E10485C6D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
>> >> >> >> John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote:
>> >> >> >> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>> >> >> >> >>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >> >> >> >
>> >> >> >> >>> huge magnet
>> >> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> >>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to
>find
>> >one.
>> >> >> >> >
>> >> >> >> >I took a powerful magnet out of a 5 1/4" floppy disk
>drive. As I
>> >> >recall.
>> >> >> >> >It would erase floppy disks. But even though it had a
>strong
>> >gripping
>> >> >> >> >effect, it would not erase/corrupt zip disks. Good luck.
>> >> >> >> >
>> >> >> >> >
>> >> >> >> >
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> No permenant magnet is powerfull enough to demag a disk
>unless you
>> >> >> >> open it up and wipe directly on the platter surfaces (any
>maybe not
>> >> >> >> even then.) The act of opening up a modern disk and
>touching the
>> >> >> >> surface makes the disk trash if you think you want to reuse
>it.
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> I believe that if you demag the platters yoiu will loss
>track servo
>> >> >> >> sync recordings that will make it impossible to reuse.
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> If your data (or your privacy) is worth more than $60, just
>take a
>> >> >> >> sledge hammer to it, of a concrete floor. Deforming the
>platters
>> >> >> >> makes it unreadable. A welding torch would do it, too.
>Physical
>> >> >> >> deformation is the only way I can think of for a private
>individual
>> >to
>> >> >> >> insure that the data can't be read.

--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 6:47:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com>, MF says...
> Hi, all
>
> Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is deader
> than a brick?
>
> It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days before
> the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
> sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> strangers.
>
> By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
Get an angle grinder and cut it up. Forget running over it. I once ran
over one with a 38 tonne lorry and it survived.


--
Conor

Opinions personal, facts suspect.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 6:47:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <IYKkd.495$G36.156@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>, Papa
says...
> Or you could just drive your car over it. ;>)
>
Doesn't work. I've run a 38 tonne truck over one and it lived.


--
Conor

Opinions personal, facts suspect.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 7:53:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Know anyone that has a 30-06?
November 11, 2004 9:18:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

that's your contribution?,...

so a ball peen hammer would be better. seems to me if you turn in a
bent -spindled or otherwise mutilated HD, there could be a question on
the warranty validation... But wait with the magnet.. the data would
be actually on the surface of the magnet...what if somebody took the
150 years to retrieve the bits and then reassembled them to find his
pictures of the backyard. practical would be to 'send the damn HD
back' and get on with it.


"Matt" <matt@themattfella.zzzz.com> wrote in message
news:MENkd.4003$3G5.813@news01.roc.ny...
> JAD wrote:
> > power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal
recycling
> > yard would do the trick.
>
> The OP asked for a _practical_ method. Sheesh ...
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 9:38:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

You might want to consider that the strength of the magnet is not the only
factor. MRI coils are big because you have to be able to put a person inside
of it. A much smaller magnet could exert more power into a smaller object
using less power. Distance does have an affect.

I put 3.5" floppies into an industrial demagnitizer, it lookded like a mini
MRI coil, we used to demagnitize machined bar stock. It would make a
screwdriver vibrate and become warm if left in it. It would not erase the
floppies or even cause errors. So it wasn't putting as much force on the
media as the little head in the drive.

Frequency might be another factor.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 11, 2004 9:38:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <3lOkd.143729$5v2.69374@fe2.columbus.rr.com>,
T Shadow <knone@zilch.com.invalid> wrote:
>You might want to consider that the strength of the magnet is not the only
>factor. MRI coils are big because you have to be able to put a person inside
>of it. A much smaller magnet could exert more power into a smaller object
>using less power. Distance does have an affect.
>
>I put 3.5" floppies into an industrial demagnitizer, it lookded like a mini
>MRI coil, we used to demagnitize machined bar stock. It would make a
>screwdriver vibrate and become warm if left in it. It would not erase the
>floppies or even cause errors. So it wasn't putting as much force on the
>media as the little head in the drive.
>
>Frequency might be another factor.
>
>


http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/dinews/2004041302.shtm...

"A system to detect objects that can turn into projectiles in
the magnetic field of an MR scanner could prevent accidents
causing personal injury and equipment damage. A specialized
metal detector being marketed by ETS-Lindgren that can be
mounted in the doorway leading to an MR suite allows staff and
patients to be scanned automatically. An alarm sounds when the
device detects ferromagnetic metal, but not MR-compatible
objects, such as an aluminum oxygen tank."

I can't think of any other industrial magnet, outside of governemt
research labs that has this kind of safety issue.

Frequency is an issue only to the point that inductive heating lowers
the curie point in the magnetic material.



--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
November 11, 2004 10:15:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Forget it.

Buy a new one on sale, send in the rebate, and hit the old one with a
sledgehammer once or twice.

Usually there's a good, cheap, sledgehammer at the local flea market.

Don't forget your safety glasses ;) 
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 1:12:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 10:15:01 -0500, Hawkeye <Hawkeye__59@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Hello over there in Norfolk from the Hampton side of the HRBT

Yo! Did you guys get an overnight freeze yet? It's been in the balmy
40's down here... :-)

--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 1:49:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 16:53:32 GMT, "T Shadow" <knone@zilch.com.invalid>
wrote:

>>>Know anyone that has a 30-06?
>>>
Actually, you would be better off with a 44-40 or .357mag or a similar
style of bullet. All the 30-06 cartridges I've seen have a jacketed
bullet which would probably put a 30 calibre hole in the center of the
disk, assuming that you are a fair shooter. The 44-40 or .357mag or
the like would have a blunt nose and maybe be a hollow point and at
the most semi-jacketed. This would cause the projectile to impact with
a larger size because of deformation and there fore tear the hell out
of the disk no matter where the bullet impacted. But YMMV.


--
The Seabat
November 12, 2004 3:30:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Take a sledge hammer and apply a hammering action to the platter.
This will make retrieval extremely difficult. Believe it or not, we
used this procedure for drives, monitors and printers to protect
classified government data. What the price of your sensitive data
getting into the wrong hands?

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:49:14 -0500, "MF"
<ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:

>Hi, all
>
>Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is deader
>than a brick?
>
>It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
>WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days before
>the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
>sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
>strangers.
>
>By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
>thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
>Thanks!
>
>Mike
>
November 12, 2004 3:36:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:49:14 -0500, "MF"
<ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:

>Hi, all
>
>Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is deader
>than a brick?
>
>It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
>WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days before
>the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
>sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
>strangers.
>
>By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
>thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
>Thanks!
>
>Mike
>

Mike, If destruction is your choice save the hard drive case. It
makes a perfect fan housing. I cut a hole in the case and mounted a
fan into the case to make a cooler. The metal can be easily cut or
drilled for fan mounting holes. It is now mounted just above my new
drive and keeping it cool.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2004 4:44:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Matt <matt@themattfella.zzzz.com> wrote:
>JAD wrote:

>> power / size well lets see...a visit to the local wrecking/metal
>> recycling yard would do the trick.
>
>The OP asked for a _practical_ method. Sheesh ...

He got one, to use a ball peen hammer.
November 12, 2004 4:16:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Rich Webb wrote:
> On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 12:31:34 +0000, Paul wrote:
>>Take a hammer to it. Bang some nails through it etc.
>
> Jeez -- why all of these violent solutions? Physical destruction is,
> indeed, the only reliable way to ensure that the data is not recoverable
> but that can also be accomplished by just taking the thing apart.
> Salvage what's re-useable and use the rest for geek Xmas-tree ornaments.

Did you ever try to take apart a drive? They mostly use those hexagonal
screws (the name of which escapes me). The last time I had to drill 'em
out.

I must admit that the magnets inside are worth saving :-)

--
Paul
November 12, 2004 4:16:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

torx

"Paul" <paul.hill@[NOSPAM]clara.co.uk> wrote in message
news:1100265368.363.0@iris.uk.clara.net...
> Rich Webb wrote:
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 12:31:34 +0000, Paul wrote:
> >>Take a hammer to it. Bang some nails through it etc.
> >
> > Jeez -- why all of these violent solutions? Physical destruction
is,
> > indeed, the only reliable way to ensure that the data is not
recoverable
> > but that can also be accomplished by just taking the thing apart.
> > Salvage what's re-useable and use the rest for geek Xmas-tree
ornaments.
>
> Did you ever try to take apart a drive? They mostly use those
hexagonal
> screws (the name of which escapes me). The last time I had to drill
'em
> out.
>
> I must admit that the magnets inside are worth saving :-)
>
> --
> Paul
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 13, 2004 4:37:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>Yo! Did you guys get an overnight freeze yet? It's been in the balmy
>40's down here... :-)

yea i noted the cars were a bit frosty lookin one night a few back
November 13, 2004 4:20:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 11 Nov 2004 10:36:32 -0500, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

>In article <5807p0ha3n0hcl84gjf04n6f1obve92b9b@4ax.com>,
>rhys <rhys@nospam.com> wrote:
>>A local radio station, even a campus one (where they might still be
>>using tape) will have a 10" x 10" x 6" grey box that resembles a very
>>heavy coffee pot warmer.
>>
>>This is a "degaussing machine".
>>
>>Run the HD over that a few times and I guarantee a complete wipe. <G>
>>
>>Of course, if you are truly paranoid, whale on it with a ball peen
>>hammer afterwards and jam the rubbish into the treads of a bulldozer.
>>
>>Should work.
>
>
>Did you try it ? Could you format and reuse the disk, afterwords ?
>
>What vintage disk ? It makes difference.

I have tried this, and it did work in that all data (or readable by
me, anyway) was gone, but I did not try to reformat the disk as I was
more concerned about TOTALLY nuking my tax returns off a 1 gig drive I
did not intend to use again.

I sold the drive and the surrounding Pentium I AT machine at a yard
sale for $10 as I recall.

R.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 13, 2004 7:53:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

First, thanks to all who replied, especially to those who read the whole
post and noticed that I was after warranty replacement, and thus was seeking
an alternative to physical destruction.

I thought a heavy duty degausser might do it, but don't have access to one -
and was hoping somebody would make a suggestion that triggered an idea or
memory of a contact who could put me next to one.

Then several suggested that no magnetic field outside of (maybe) an mri
scanner would do it- but others said they had done it successfully with a
degausser soooo..... my nearest friend in a radio station is 450 miles
away - too far to be practical right now.

A couple reasons I wanted it replaced: a new drive of same size costs 55 to
70 bucks, which I didn't want to spend. A super shopper said they cost 40,
but I couldn't find any at that price - which, after all, would be 34 plus
shipping. And, the damned thing failed. All that data was on there because
I,personally, have never had a drive fail before the warranty expired. I
know they do, I have replaced other people's drives that failed after 6 or
seven months, but, personally, no. I have drives that are still running
after 10 years. So I wanted the company to bear part of the burden of a
defective product.

The person who said, just send it back, they won't bother trying to revive
it, is probably right, but since it contains tons of financial information,
paswords, and other forms of ID, I didn't feel comfortable with that
probably. I think a chip or other element on the circuit board failed. So
if the thing fell into the hands of the wrong person, it would be simple to
revive. Again, that's not probable, but as we all know, there are people
out there who steal in every conceivable manner, so being paranoid seemed
the logical thing to do. Sraightening out financial/identity theft can take
years.

So far, I've tried wiggling, jolting, tapping with screw driver, rapping the
sides of the drive against a table and freezing. All I need is for it to
run long enough to wipe, even in an "insecure" manner. I am willing, even
in my paranoid state, to conceed that the thieves this drive might encounter
are probably not going to use data recovery software, and definitely not use
an electron scanning microscope. But none of the above methods worked.

Next comes heating and slamming hard on to a concrete floor. I doubt I can
keep the drive square enough with the floor to avoid evidence of abuse, so
that's the last step before the hammer.

BTW, somone, "kenny" I think, provided a good link to many tales of drive
revival, here: http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6255-5029761-2.html .

Mike

"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
news:Zdudnbvtl_encg_cRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Hi, all
>
> Anyone know a practical, effective way to erase a hard drive that is
deader
> than a brick?
>
> It's a West. Digital 60 gig 7200 RPM. It won't spin up and
> WD's diagnostic utilities won't recognize it. It went out a few days
before
> the warranty expired and I want to try to return it, but it has _lots_ of
> sensitive info on it, and, dead or not, I don't want it in the hands of
> strangers.
>
> By practical, I mean something not too hard to get access to. Running it
> thru an MRI scanner might be worth a try, but not too practical....
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 13, 2004 8:42:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Yeah, or a hammer maybe??


"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:IYKkd.495$G36.156@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Or you could just drive your car over it. ;>)
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 14, 2004 4:08:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> The person who said, just send it back, they won't bother trying to revive
> it, is probably right, but since it contains tons of financial information,
> paswords, and other forms of ID, I didn't feel comfortable with that
> probably. I think a chip or other element on the circuit board failed. So
> if the thing fell into the hands of the wrong person, it would be simple to
> revive. Again, that's not probable, but as we all know, there are people
> out there who steal in every conceivable manner, so being paranoid seemed
> the logical thing to do. Sraightening out financial/identity theft can take
> years.

This is something I've considered. If your drive fails, so that
you cannot access it, are you really going to ship it off to a
strange company, with all your personal and business data on the
disk? Or are you going to hit it with a hammer, and buy a new
drive, even though the old one is still under warranty? My guess
is that if you care about your privacy, you are going to swallow
the loss and just buy a new drive, rather than risk anybody at
Maxtor or elsewhere reading your data.

Luckily for me, the times my harddrives have failed, I've always
had enough warning to write zeros to the drive before sending it
off for a replacement.

It is in the interests of the harddrive makers to preserve the
FUD, since they save money if you ignore your own warranty and
just buy a new drive ... as long as it is one of their drives.
What they should do is certify that your data will never be seen
by anybody and that the drive will be wiped clean or physically
destroyed. They should explicitly guarantee this, if you send a
defective drive back for replacement under warranty.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 16, 2004 10:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Al Smith" <invalid@address.com> wrote in message
news:6eyld.178171$Np3.7186455@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>
> This is something I've considered. If your drive fails, so that
> you cannot access it, are you really going to ship it off to a
> strange company, with all your personal and business data on the
> disk? Or are you going to hit it with a hammer, and buy a new
> drive, even though the old one is still under warranty? My guess
> is that if you care about your privacy, you are going to swallow
> the loss and just buy a new drive, rather than risk anybody at
> Maxtor or elsewhere reading your data.
>
> Luckily for me, the times my harddrives have failed, I've always
> had enough warning to write zeros to the drive before sending it
> off for a replacement.
>
> It is in the interests of the harddrive makers to preserve the
> FUD, since they save money if you ignore your own warranty and
> just buy a new drive ... as long as it is one of their drives.
> What they should do is certify that your data will never be seen
> by anybody and that the drive will be wiped clean or physically
> destroyed. They should explicitly guarantee this, if you send a
> defective drive back for replacement under warranty.

I agree - this would certainly be good customer service. But that doesn't
seem to be their primary concern. They must be aware that a potential
problem exists - even in terms of their own liability - but as we have seen
over and over, companies tend to ignore this sort of thing in the hopes that
they can settle individual cases for small amounts. Even when the product
is potentially lethal. But in this case, it shouldn't cost them much money
to provide the customer with a better policy.

Mike
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 17, 2004 5:01:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:

> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>> huge magnet
>
> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.

I saw some strong on Ebay .
Look for "Neodymium Magnets"

You may want to ask of they can wipe HDs without dismantling.
Also see

http://www.networksecurityarchive.org/html/Security-Bas...
10/msg00344.html

"I have sold the rare earth magnets for disrupting information on discs,
but we do not claim to remove info, only disrupt it enough so it is not
readable.", and, "I have sold the larger neo blocks to hospitals and to
governmental agencies for this application. But the neo magnets are
expensive, the largest is a 1" X 2" X 2" NB147N-35 and they are $55.00
per."

http://www.dansdata.com/gz009.htm

That gives me a thought ...

I do have about 90 odd floppy disks I want to trash though so a little
magnet would save me some time and effort. And save my floppy drive from
having to read some of the dirtier floppies that have been lying around
for years.


--
Lordy
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 17, 2004 5:01:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Lordy wrote:

> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
> news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:
>
>
>>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>huge magnet
>>
>>lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>
>
> I saw some strong on Ebay .
> Look for "Neodymium Magnets"
>
> You may want to ask of they can wipe HDs without dismantling.
> Also see
>
> http://www.networksecurityarchive.org/html/Security-Bas...
> 10/msg00344.html
>
> "I have sold the rare earth magnets for disrupting information on discs,
> but we do not claim to remove info, only disrupt it enough so it is not
> readable.", and, "I have sold the larger neo blocks to hospitals and to
> governmental agencies for this application. But the neo magnets are
> expensive, the largest is a 1" X 2" X 2" NB147N-35 and they are $55.00
> per."
>
> http://www.dansdata.com/gz009.htm
>
> That gives me a thought ...
>
> I do have about 90 odd floppy disks I want to trash though so a little
> magnet would save me some time and effort. And save my floppy drive from
> having to read some of the dirtier floppies that have been lying around
> for years.
>
>

http://www.wavinc.com/item1377.htm
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 17, 2004 8:48:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
>news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:
>
>> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>>> huge magnet
>>
>> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.


http://www.issidata.com/shopexd.asp?id=1333
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 4:11:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"seabat" <seabat@boardermail.com> wrote in message
news:D tf8p0hd9c80g892e2s8lnakujhobr3t8l@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 16:53:32 GMT, "T Shadow" <knone@zilch.com.invalid>
> wrote:
>
> >>>Know anyone that has a 30-06?
> >>>
> Actually, you would be better off with a 44-40 or .357mag or a similar
> style of bullet. All the 30-06 cartridges I've seen have a jacketed
> bullet which would probably put a 30 calibre hole in the center of the
> disk, assuming that you are a fair shooter. The 44-40 or .357mag or
> the like would have a blunt nose and maybe be a hollow point and at
> the most semi-jacketed. This would cause the projectile to impact with
> a larger size because of deformation and there fore tear the hell out
> of the disk no matter where the bullet impacted. But YMMV.
--
> The Seabat

Actually, you wouldn't be better off with a 44-40 or a .357. Most all 30-06
rounds are for hunting and are either soft point or hollow point, so they
expand and kill the animal rather than going through it. Hot loads come out
at 3100 fps, normal loads at 2700 fps with a 180 grain bullet. A 30-06
compares to a 44-40, a .44 mag, or a .357 mag as a tank does to the Hummer
you see cruising your local mall. A 30-06 would blow the drive to pieces.
But that was not what I was looking for.

Thnx,

Mike
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 7:44:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

<bzzzz...mmm> wrote in message
news:hqvnp0dmibsj245m9ipigegvnh9u7anv1l@4ax.com...
>
> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
> >news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:
> >
> >> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> >>> huge magnet
> >>
> >> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>
>
> http://www.issidata.com/shopexd.asp?id=1333

Cool! Only $2,423.56. Now if I knew someone at a place that had one of
these.....
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 8:01:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
news:kaednRZ1l40fEwDcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
>
> "seabat" <seabat@boardermail.com> wrote in message
> news:D tf8p0hd9c80g892e2s8lnakujhobr3t8l@4ax.com...
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 16:53:32 GMT, "T Shadow" <knone@zilch.com.invalid>
> > wrote:
> >
> > >>>Know anyone that has a 30-06?
> > >>>
> > Actually, you would be better off with a 44-40 or .357mag or a similar
> > style of bullet. All the 30-06 cartridges I've seen have a jacketed
> > bullet which would probably put a 30 calibre hole in the center of the
> > disk, assuming that you are a fair shooter. The 44-40 or .357mag or
> > the like would have a blunt nose and maybe be a hollow point and at
> > the most semi-jacketed. This would cause the projectile to impact with
> > a larger size because of deformation and there fore tear the hell out
> > of the disk no matter where the bullet impacted. But YMMV.
> --
> > The Seabat
>
> Actually, you wouldn't be better off with a 44-40 or a .357. Most all
30-06
> rounds are for hunting and are either soft point or hollow point, so they
> expand and kill the animal rather than going through it. Hot loads come
out
> at 3100 fps, normal loads at 2700 fps with a 180 grain bullet. A 30-06
> compares to a 44-40, a .44 mag, or a .357 mag as a tank does to the Hummer
> you see cruising your local mall. A 30-06 would blow the drive to
pieces.
> But that was not what I was looking for.
>
> Thnx,
>
> Mike
>
>
Humor is tough in newsgroups. I was going for something with recognition.
30-06 sounds a lot less like a drill bit than .458. I wasn't expecting many
who know what a grain is. Your power comparison is spot on.
That was a last resort.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 8:01:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"T Shadow" <knone@zilch.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:0Gpnd.3031$182.2913@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> "MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in message
> news:kaednRZ1l40fEwDcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> >
> > "seabat" <seabat@boardermail.com> wrote in message
> > news:D tf8p0hd9c80g892e2s8lnakujhobr3t8l@4ax.com...
> > > On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 16:53:32 GMT, "T Shadow" <knone@zilch.com.invalid>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >>>Know anyone that has a 30-06?
> > > >>>
> > > Actually, you would be better off with a 44-40 or .357mag or a similar
> > > style of bullet. All the 30-06 cartridges I've seen have a jacketed
> > > bullet which would probably put a 30 calibre hole in the center of the
> > > disk, assuming that you are a fair shooter. The 44-40 or .357mag or
> > > the like would have a blunt nose and maybe be a hollow point and at
> > > the most semi-jacketed. This would cause the projectile to impact with
> > > a larger size because of deformation and there fore tear the hell out
> > > of the disk no matter where the bullet impacted. But YMMV.
> > --
> > > The Seabat
> >
> > Actually, you wouldn't be better off with a 44-40 or a .357. Most all
> 30-06
> > rounds are for hunting and are either soft point or hollow point, so
they
> > expand and kill the animal rather than going through it. Hot loads come
> out
> > at 3100 fps, normal loads at 2700 fps with a 180 grain bullet. A 30-06
> > compares to a 44-40, a .44 mag, or a .357 mag as a tank does to the
Hummer
> > you see cruising your local mall. A 30-06 would blow the drive to
> pieces.
> > But that was not what I was looking for.
> >
> > Thnx,
> >
> > Mike
> >
> >
> Humor is tough in newsgroups. I was going for something with recognition.
> 30-06 sounds a lot less like a drill bit than .458. I wasn't expecting
many
> who know what a grain is. Your power comparison is spot on.
> That was a last resort.
>
That's about where I am at, at the last resort. And this one would at least
be fun. I once shot up a fridge and a TV set with a 12 gauge for a movie -
hell of a lot of fun. :) 

Mike
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 8:51:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <puWdnSe4L7yY9APcRVn-uw@comcast.com>,
MF <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>
><bzzzz...mmm> wrote in message
>news:hqvnp0dmibsj245m9ipigegvnh9u7anv1l@4ax.com...
>>
>> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
>> >news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:
>> >
>> >> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>> >>> huge magnet
>> >>
>> >> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>>
>>
>> http://www.issidata.com/shopexd.asp?id=1333
>
>Cool! Only $2,423.56. Now if I knew someone at a place that had one of
>these.....
>

"...Please note that hard disk drives cannot be reused after
they are degaussed, as the degaussing vibrations damage the
read/write heads..."





--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 19, 2004 9:01:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <puWdnSe4L7yY9APcRVn-uw@comcast.com>,
MF <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote:
>
><bzzzz...mmm> wrote in message
>news:hqvnp0dmibsj245m9ipigegvnh9u7anv1l@4ax.com...
>>
>> >"MF" <ctatraining@spammersgotojail.net> wrote in
>> >news:h9ednRpFIb0lng7cRVn-oA@comcast.com:
>> >
>> >> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:10p60426k6qg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
>> >>> huge magnet
>> >>
>> >> lol. that's what I'm looking for, but don't know where to find one.
>>
>>
>> http://www.issidata.com/shopexd.asp?id=1333
>
>Cool! Only $2,423.56. Now if I knew someone at a place that had one of
>these.....
>
>


Depending on who you are trying to keep your information from, the
above model may not be strong enough to zero a modern hard disk.

The web site for the manufacturer shows that there are NSA-spec
degaussers, but a quick read of the specs for the NSA models doesn't
claim to erase hard disks, just tapes and floppies.

http://www.garner-products.com/harddrive.htm

A sledge hammer is still your best bet.


--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
----
!