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What's good to put out a cpu fire?

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 5:18:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

No I didn't catch my CPU on fire, but I can feel the flames

Yes I am a Troll but I think I know one of this groups trolls after
reviewing some older messages.
No I did not come to this group to troll
I really do need some help with my pc
some of the things I said may of been a little off
but I do tend to rush my messages

I believe it is a misunderstanding, anyhow. As people by my ignorance and
lack of detailed discription concluded that I had somehow attached the mobo
directly to the plate.

in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
where intended.

I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes and did
not require the standard fibre washers, which were not included anyhow
then someone became frightened and thought I had screwed the mobo to a metal
plane.
I became concerned that I should of installed some fibre washers and
fabricated some of my own out of scrap leather. The mobo did not function
at all in this configuration. When I returned it to its origional state it
did not function. It was not untill I recieved the new psu and had it
installed (after i asked if it could be doa) that the mobo returned to its
origional but not better not working state

I asked a question about some sticky residue on the bottom of the cooler.
The replies suggested that it was the reminants of thermal tape. It was
actually the residue from the oem plastic film that protects the tape.
The cooler did not have the film when It arrived

I was confused again by the thermal tape.
When the system did not function, I removed the cooler to find the tape had
left residue on the die of the cpu. I was alarmed. Someone thought I had
left the plastic film on the cooler and it had melted, and I didn't know any
better.

I cleaned off the majority of the tape turned gunk with a flat craft tool,
and the residue with acetone. At which point I noticed the craft tool by my
hand had nicked the die in a couple of places. Still no-one has answered as
to whether or not that is fatal.

I did turn the system on while there was no paste between the cpu and the
cooler, but for no longer then at the most a minute. Most likly only long
enough to listen for some kind of beep from the BIOS

The video has never come on, so I am still assuming the board or the
processor is at fault. The processor I suspect because the northbridge fan
and cpu fans do spin. I was just trying to feel out some ideas as to how I
can narrow down the posibilities to a single failure. I do not know if i
can get a return on the processor. However when It arived I did notice a
discoloration around the die on the cpu, which I could interperate as
melting (if that kind of thing happenes) or simply where a previous user had
let some paste drip over onto the cpu (which I heard was bad, but the seller
assures it was tested running before shipped)

The PSU i ordered before I really knew what to look for in a psu. I've
always been more of a salvage type rather then a buy it in a box guy, so I
tend to run into a few more snags than the average guy.

I just use this newsgroup to honestly vent my ideas mistakes and
frustrations like anyone else. You should be happy with the amount of
respect I have tried to show here.
Sorry about the immature personal attack btw


--
We are Many
Mark 5:9

More about : good put cpu fire

November 13, 2004 5:18:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

troll leave...if not .read...

>in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
> each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
> these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
> where intended.

I still don't agree with this.
How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the MB (except
where the contact is obvious)??.

Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure if you
mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine adjustment
dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.

I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting the areas
around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers since 1992.

.." <many@no.body> wrote in message
news:H9eld.25141$KJ6.7813@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> No I didn't catch my CPU on fire, but I can feel the flames
>
> Yes I am a Troll but I think I know one of this groups trolls after
> reviewing some older messages.
> No I did not come to this group to troll
> I really do need some help with my pc
> some of the things I said may of been a little off
> but I do tend to rush my messages
>
> I believe it is a misunderstanding, anyhow. As people by my ignorance and
> lack of detailed discription concluded that I had somehow attached the
mobo
> directly to the plate.
>
> in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
> each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
> these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
> where intended.
>
> I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes and
did
> not require the standard fibre washers, which were not included anyhow
> then someone became frightened and thought I had screwed the mobo to a
metal
> plane.
> I became concerned that I should of installed some fibre washers and
> fabricated some of my own out of scrap leather. The mobo did not function
> at all in this configuration. When I returned it to its origional state
it
> did not function. It was not untill I recieved the new psu and had it
> installed (after i asked if it could be doa) that the mobo returned to its
> origional but not better not working state
>
> I asked a question about some sticky residue on the bottom of the cooler.
> The replies suggested that it was the reminants of thermal tape. It was
> actually the residue from the oem plastic film that protects the tape.
> The cooler did not have the film when It arrived
>
> I was confused again by the thermal tape.
> When the system did not function, I removed the cooler to find the tape
had
> left residue on the die of the cpu. I was alarmed. Someone thought I had
> left the plastic film on the cooler and it had melted, and I didn't know
any
> better.
>
> I cleaned off the majority of the tape turned gunk with a flat craft tool,
> and the residue with acetone. At which point I noticed the craft tool by
my
> hand had nicked the die in a couple of places. Still no-one has answered
as
> to whether or not that is fatal.
>
> I did turn the system on while there was no paste between the cpu and the
> cooler, but for no longer then at the most a minute. Most likly only long
> enough to listen for some kind of beep from the BIOS
>
> The video has never come on, so I am still assuming the board or the
> processor is at fault. The processor I suspect because the northbridge
fan
> and cpu fans do spin. I was just trying to feel out some ideas as to how I
> can narrow down the posibilities to a single failure. I do not know if i
> can get a return on the processor. However when It arived I did notice a
> discoloration around the die on the cpu, which I could interperate as
> melting (if that kind of thing happenes) or simply where a previous user
had
> let some paste drip over onto the cpu (which I heard was bad, but the
seller
> assures it was tested running before shipped)
>
> The PSU i ordered before I really knew what to look for in a psu. I've
> always been more of a salvage type rather then a buy it in a box guy, so I
> tend to run into a few more snags than the average guy.
>
> I just use this newsgroup to honestly vent my ideas mistakes and
> frustrations like anyone else. You should be happy with the amount of
> respect I have tried to show here.
> Sorry about the immature personal attack btw
>
>
> --
> We are Many
> Mark 5:9
>
>
November 13, 2004 5:18:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"leigon." <many@no.body> wrote in message
news:H9eld.25141$KJ6.7813@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> No I didn't catch my CPU on fire, but I can feel the flames
>
> Yes I am a Troll but I think I know one of this groups trolls after
> reviewing some older messages.
> No I did not come to this group to troll
> I really do need some help with my pc
> some of the things I said may of been a little off
> but I do tend to rush my messages
>
> I believe it is a misunderstanding, anyhow. As people by my ignorance and
> lack of detailed discription concluded that I had somehow attached the
> mobo
> directly to the plate.
>
> in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
> each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
> these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
> where intended.
>

I would still use standoffs. The tray can flex and make contact if you only
depend on those raised mounds you're talking about.

> I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes and
> did
> not require the standard fibre washers, which were not included anyhow
> then someone became frightened and thought I had screwed the mobo to a
> metal
> plane.

True.


> I became concerned that I should of installed some fibre washers and
> fabricated some of my own out of scrap leather. The mobo did not function
> at all in this configuration. When I returned it to its origional state
> it
> did not function. It was not untill I recieved the new psu and had it
> installed (after i asked if it could be doa) that the mobo returned to its
> origional but not better not working state
>
> I asked a question about some sticky residue on the bottom of the cooler.
> The replies suggested that it was the reminants of thermal tape. It was
> actually the residue from the oem plastic film that protects the tape.
> The cooler did not have the film when It arrived
>
> I was confused again by the thermal tape.
> When the system did not function, I removed the cooler to find the tape
> had
> left residue on the die of the cpu. I was alarmed. Someone thought I had
> left the plastic film on the cooler and it had melted, and I didn't know
> any
> better.
>
> I cleaned off the majority of the tape turned gunk with a flat craft tool,
> and the residue with acetone. At which point I noticed the craft tool by
> my
> hand had nicked the die in a couple of places. Still no-one has answered
> as
> to whether or not that is fatal.

You've probably ruined the CPU.

>
> I did turn the system on while there was no paste between the cpu and the
> cooler, but for no longer then at the most a minute. Most likly only long
> enough to listen for some kind of beep from the BIOS


You may have fried the CPU.

>
> The video has never come on, so I am still assuming the board or the
> processor is at fault. The processor I suspect because the northbridge
> fan
> and cpu fans do spin. I was just trying to feel out some ideas as to how I
> can narrow down the posibilities to a single failure. I do not know if i
> can get a return on the processor. However when It arived I did notice a
> discoloration around the die on the cpu, which I could interperate as
> melting (if that kind of thing happenes) or simply where a previous user
> had
> let some paste drip over onto the cpu (which I heard was bad, but the
> seller
> assures it was tested running before shipped)
>
> The PSU i ordered before I really knew what to look for in a psu. I've
> always been more of a salvage type rather then a buy it in a box guy, so I
> tend to run into a few more snags than the average guy.

You get what you pay for...


>
> I just use this newsgroup to honestly vent my ideas mistakes and
> frustrations like anyone else. You should be happy with the amount of
> respect I have tried to show here.
> Sorry about the immature personal attack btw
>
>
> --
> We are Many
> Mark 5:9
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 5:18:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

JAD wrote:

> troll leave...if not .read...
>
>
>>in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
>>each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
>>these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
>>where intended.
>
>
> I still don't agree with this.
> How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
> Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the MB (except
> where the contact is obvious)??.
>
> Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure if you
> mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine adjustment
> dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.

I understand your skepticism but I have one. Stamped, threaded, dimples in
the plate. Works fine.


> I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting the areas
> around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers since 1992.

Same here, except for the case with the stamped dimples. Well, and except
for the case where the standoffs are stamped and folded into a 'U' that you
squeeze together at the bottom to fit into 'slot holes' in the mobo tray.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 7:56:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"leigon." <many@no.body> wrote:

See below for header information.

>No I didn't catch my CPU on fire, but I can feel the flames
>Yes I am a Troll

Your subject line is a troll. Persistently starting new threads is a
troll.

>but I think I know one of this groups trolls after
>reviewing some older messages.
>No I did not come to this group to troll

Then why did you change your identity immediately prior to entering this
group? And why did you just change your identity again?

>I really do need some help with my pc
>some of the things I said may of been a little off
>but I do tend to rush my messages

Nobody has complained about rushed messages. Besides trolling, your
recklessness, lack of conciseness, and long winded rambling is a problem
IMO.

....

>I just use this newsgroup to honestly vent my ideas mistakes and
>frustrations like anyone else. You should be happy with the amount of
>respect I have tried to show here.
>Sorry about the immature personal attack btw
>
>
>--
> We are Many
>Mark 5:9
>
>
>
>Path: newssvr12.news.prodigy.com!newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!prodigy.net!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!news.glorb.com!newshub.sdsu.edu!elnk-nf2-pas!newsfeed.earthlink.net!stamper.news.pas.earthlink.net!newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net.POSTED!ca5730ec!not-for-mail
>Reply-To: "leigon." <many@no.body>
>From: "leigon." <many@no.body>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
>Subject: What's good to put out a cpu fire?
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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 10:11:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>"leigon." <many@no.body> wrote in message

>> I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes

>True.

Maybe Microstar International (MSI) is an exception. The mounting holes on
my new mainboards are intended to be ground points. I just proved that
using a continuity checker. When small outline integrated circuit chip
(SOIC) surface mount (SMT) device ground pins on the mainboard are
connected to the case, you know the case is used for mainboard ground. Also
telling is the fact that there are raised metal/solder bumps on the
mounting holes which go to the case ground, and mainboard standoffs are
made of electricity conducting metal.
November 13, 2004 10:11:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95A0C1CC882wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48...
> "Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>>"leigon." <many@no.body> wrote in message
>
>>> I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes
>
>>True.
>
> Maybe Microstar International (MSI) is an exception. The mounting holes on
> my new mainboards are intended to be ground points. I just proved that
> using a continuity checker. When small outline integrated circuit chip
> (SOIC) surface mount (SMT) device ground pins on the mainboard are
> connected to the case, you know the case is used for mainboard ground.
> Also
> telling is the fact that there are raised metal/solder bumps on the
> mounting holes which go to the case ground, and mainboard standoffs are
> made of electricity conducting metal.

The motherboard traces are now protected (insulated) from coming into
contact with the screw head and shorting, so you no longer need the paper
washers.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 10:23:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>"leigon." <many@no.body> wrote in message

>> I had read that newer mobos were insulated around the mounting holes
>> and did not require the standard fibre washers, which were not
>> included anyhow then someone became frightened and thought I had
>> screwed the mobo to a metal plane.
>
>True.

The mounting holes on new Microstar International (MSI) mainboards are
intended to be electrically connected to a case. The case is used for
mainboard ground. There is no insulation around the mounting holes.
Instead, there are raised electricity conducting metal/solder bumps
which help make contact with the electricity conducting metal mainboard
standoffs which are firmly connected to the metal case.





>
>
>
>
>
>
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>From: "Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
>References: <H9eld.25141$KJ6.7813@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>
>Subject: Re: What's good to put out a cpu fire?
>Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 01:28:11 -0500
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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 11:55:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message

....

>> Maybe Microstar International (MSI) is an exception. The mounting
>> holes on my new mainboards are intended to be ground points. I just
>> proved that using a continuity checker. When small outline integrated
>> circuit chip (SOIC) surface mount (SMT) device ground pins on the
>> mainboard are connected to the case, you know the case is used for
>> mainboard ground. Also
>> telling is the fact that there are raised metal/solder bumps on the
>> mounting holes which go to the case ground, and mainboard standoffs
>> are made of electricity conducting metal.
>
>The motherboard traces are now protected (insulated) from coming into
>contact with the screw head and shorting, so you no longer need the
>paper washers.

Are we talking about the same thing?
Motherboard traces include ground. Ground contacts the screw head and the
mainboard standoff, and shorts to the case. If you put a paper washer
between the mainboard and the screw head, you will insulate what should be
contact. It probably also has contact on the underside of the mainboard
which shorts to the mainboard standoff. I don't doubt that a system
functions without shorting the motherboard mounting holes to the case. But
the point where the screw head contacts is a solder coated circle around
the mounting hole which is connected probably to most component ground
pins (including surface mount devices). By design the mounting hole area
is supposed to short to the screw head. At least that's the way it is on
my mainboards.
November 13, 2004 11:55:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95A01DC0F186Ewisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
> "Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>>> Maybe Microstar International (MSI) is an exception. The mounting
>>> holes on my new mainboards are intended to be ground points. I just
>>> proved that using a continuity checker. When small outline integrated
>>> circuit chip (SOIC) surface mount (SMT) device ground pins on the
>>> mainboard are connected to the case, you know the case is used for
>>> mainboard ground. Also
>>> telling is the fact that there are raised metal/solder bumps on the
>>> mounting holes which go to the case ground, and mainboard standoffs
>>> are made of electricity conducting metal.
>>
>>The motherboard traces are now protected (insulated) from coming into
>>contact with the screw head and shorting, so you no longer need the
>>paper washers.
>
> Are we talking about the same thing?
> Motherboard traces include ground. Ground contacts the screw head and the
> mainboard standoff, and shorts to the case. If you put a paper washer
> between the mainboard and the screw head, you will insulate what should be
> contact. It probably also has contact on the underside of the mainboard
> which shorts to the mainboard standoff. I don't doubt that a system
> functions without shorting the motherboard mounting holes to the case. But
> the point where the screw head contacts is a solder coated circle around
> the mounting hole which is connected probably to most component ground
> pins (including surface mount devices). By design the mounting hole area
> is supposed to short to the screw head. At least that's the way it is on
> my mainboards.
>
>
>
>

We are talking about different things.
Before the current design, motherboards were designed differently and you
needed those paper washers to prevent shorting the traces, but now they have
those metal eyelets to prevent the screws from shorting the traces that you
do not want to ground. This is also why you want the motherboard on
standoffs, to prevent the traces from shorting on the motherboard tray. So
like I said in my previous message, the traces you want protected from the
screw head are now insulated from coming into contact with it.
November 13, 2004 11:55:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 04:53:23 -0500, "Martin"
<ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:

>
>
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>news:Xns95A01DC0F186Ewisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
>> "Martin" <ghz1866@nospamplease.org.invalid> wrote:
>>>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>>> Maybe Microstar International (MSI) is an exception. The mounting
>>>> holes on my new mainboards are intended to be ground points. I just
>>>> proved that using a continuity checker. When small outline integrated
>>>> circuit chip (SOIC) surface mount (SMT) device ground pins on the
>>>> mainboard are connected to the case, you know the case is used for
>>>> mainboard ground. Also
>>>> telling is the fact that there are raised metal/solder bumps on the
>>>> mounting holes which go to the case ground, and mainboard standoffs
>>>> are made of electricity conducting metal.
>>>
>>>The motherboard traces are now protected (insulated) from coming into
>>>contact with the screw head and shorting, so you no longer need the
>>>paper washers.
>>
>> Are we talking about the same thing?
>> Motherboard traces include ground. Ground contacts the screw head and the
>> mainboard standoff, and shorts to the case. If you put a paper washer
>> between the mainboard and the screw head, you will insulate what should be
>> contact. It probably also has contact on the underside of the mainboard
>> which shorts to the mainboard standoff. I don't doubt that a system
>> functions without shorting the motherboard mounting holes to the case. But
>> the point where the screw head contacts is a solder coated circle around
>> the mounting hole which is connected probably to most component ground
>> pins (including surface mount devices). By design the mounting hole area
>> is supposed to short to the screw head. At least that's the way it is on
>> my mainboards.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>We are talking about different things.
>Before the current design, motherboards were designed differently and you
>needed those paper washers to prevent shorting the traces, but now they have
>those metal eyelets to prevent the screws from shorting the traces that you
>do not want to ground. This is also why you want the motherboard on
>standoffs, to prevent the traces from shorting on the motherboard tray. So
>like I said in my previous message, the traces you want protected from the
>screw head are now insulated from coming into contact with it.
>

On a more humorous note I once pushed on the edge of a motherboard (
for some reason that escapes me now ) while the computer was powered
up and the edge of the MB touched the metal back plane. The CRT went
blank and I thought I had ruined the MB but all it did was reboot and
I was back in business. I would heartily recommend against doing this
as I was pretty lucky. ;) 
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 12:59:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message news:<10paumecjc3l514@corp.supernews.com>...
> troll leave...if not .read...
>
> >in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw holes
> > each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the mobo.
> > these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal surface, except
> > where intended.
>
> I still don't agree with this.
> How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
> Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the MB (except
> where the contact is obvious)??.
>
I've used many such cases. In fact, I just completed building a new
computer an hour ago using a case with just that type of mobo
standoff. The dimple is a little over half an inch wide at the base,
but tapers so that it's much smaller at the top where it meets the
bottom of the mobo. It's wider than the usual brass standoff, but
there's still plenty of space around each mounting point.

I don't know if there's a standard spec for minimum radial clearance
around each hole for non-grounded solder points, but on the mobos I've
used there's no danger of accidental electrical contact after it's
been firmly screwed on.

Not only PCI and AGP cards, but also the onboard back ports like LAN,
VGA, parallel, serial, audio, etc. line up with their respective
holes.

As it seems some of us here have not yet come across this type of
case, I compared the height of the dimple with some spare brass
standoffs. The dimple on the case I have on hand is slightly shorter
than the brass standoff, but there's ample clearance between mobo and
base plate.

> Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure if you
> mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine adjustment
> dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.
>
Actually, my cases are not high-end. They're generally US $20-30 types
*with* PSUs.

> I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting the areas
> around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers since 1992.
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 1:21:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I wrote:

<snip>

Sorry for the additional reply to the same post. It was canceled except by
Google.
November 13, 2004 1:28:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

throw a brand name out there
I would like to see an example, for future reference.
And All mainboards can be used?
he describes them as 'mounds' I don't think this is the same thing
your talking about.



"Zotin Khuma" <zotin_k@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
news:304fc392.0411130959.2a337ec3@posting.google.com...
> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
news:<10paumecjc3l514@corp.supernews.com>...
> > troll leave...if not .read...
> >
> > >in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw
holes
> > > each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the
mobo.
> > > these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal
surface, except
> > > where intended.
> >
> > I still don't agree with this.
> > How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
> > Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the
MB (except
> > where the contact is obvious)??.
> >
> I've used many such cases. In fact, I just completed building a new
> computer an hour ago using a case with just that type of mobo
> standoff. The dimple is a little over half an inch wide at the base,
> but tapers so that it's much smaller at the top where it meets the
> bottom of the mobo. It's wider than the usual brass standoff, but
> there's still plenty of space around each mounting point.
>
> I don't know if there's a standard spec for minimum radial clearance
> around each hole for non-grounded solder points, but on the mobos
I've
> used there's no danger of accidental electrical contact after it's
> been firmly screwed on.
>
> Not only PCI and AGP cards, but also the onboard back ports like
LAN,
> VGA, parallel, serial, audio, etc. line up with their respective
> holes.
>
> As it seems some of us here have not yet come across this type of
> case, I compared the height of the dimple with some spare brass
> standoffs. The dimple on the case I have on hand is slightly shorter
> than the brass standoff, but there's ample clearance between mobo
and
> base plate.
>
> > Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure
if you
> > mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine
adjustment
> > dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.
> >
> Actually, my cases are not high-end. They're generally US $20-30
types
> *with* PSUs.
>
> > I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting
the areas
> > around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers
since 1992.
> >
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 6:42:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Ok, so I do have a few bad habits I brought with me from elsewhere
I'l admit that

It's definatly no high end case (does everyones atx pse almost cover the
cooling unit on the cpu?)

you know what case I liked? It was an old Dell Optiplex, and I forget
exactly how it worked, but it was hinged conviently

there is a lot of flex in the mobo mounting plate, but the board does not
have any holes that line up with anything but a mound. What would I of done
if one of the mounds was in an inconvienient place I wonder...

I believe the CPU was doa, and I damaged it further making it unreturnable I
am sure

i don't need the washers, the board should be screwed to the mounds allowing
the board to ground to the head of the screw (the mobo has the soldered
bumps around the hole) correct?

I promise I will leave you guys alone
for a while

--
We are Many
Mark 5:9
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2004 6:42:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

leigon. wrote:

> Ok, so I do have a few bad habits I brought with me from elsewhere
> I'l admit that
>
> It's definatly no high end case (does everyones atx pse almost cover the
> cooling unit on the cpu?)

If you mean the type that has the PSU mounted on it's side, rather than
horizontal across the top of the case, that was a common socket 7 layout to
keep the case shorter, but also a bit wider. Pleeeeenty of room for the
kinds of heatsinks used on those things. I'd imagine they were also used
for socket 370 and you actually *can* get a standard slot-1 cart to 'just'
make it, but not the 'typical' slotket because they're taller. It would be
a real problem for the larger heatsinks of today.

That's the layout of the one I have with the stamped mounting 'domes' on a
slide tray.

> you know what case I liked? It was an old Dell Optiplex, and I forget
> exactly how it worked, but it was hinged conviently
>
> there is a lot of flex in the mobo mounting plate, but the board does not
> have any holes that line up with anything but a mound. What would I of done
> if one of the mounds was in an inconvienient place I wonder...
>
> I believe the CPU was doa, and I damaged it further making it unreturnable I
> am sure
>
> i don't need the washers, the board should be screwed to the mounds allowing
> the board to ground to the head of the screw (the mobo has the soldered
> bumps around the hole) correct?
>
> I promise I will leave you guys alone
> for a while
>
> --
> We are Many
> Mark 5:9
>
>
November 14, 2004 1:59:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

http://store1.yimg.com/I/dealsonic_1818_23208942

On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 10:28:50 -0800, "JAD" <Kapasitor@coldmail.com>
wrote:

>throw a brand name out there
>I would like to see an example, for future reference.
>And All mainboards can be used?
> he describes them as 'mounds' I don't think this is the same thing
>your talking about.
>
>
>
>"Zotin Khuma" <zotin_k@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
>news:304fc392.0411130959.2a337ec3@posting.google.com...
>> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>news:<10paumecjc3l514@corp.supernews.com>...
>> > troll leave...if not .read...
>> >
>> > >in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw
>holes
>> > > each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the
>mobo.
>> > > these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal
>surface, except
>> > > where intended.
>> >
>> > I still don't agree with this.
>> > How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
>> > Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the
>MB (except
>> > where the contact is obvious)??.
>> >
>> I've used many such cases. In fact, I just completed building a new
>> computer an hour ago using a case with just that type of mobo
>> standoff. The dimple is a little over half an inch wide at the base,
>> but tapers so that it's much smaller at the top where it meets the
>> bottom of the mobo. It's wider than the usual brass standoff, but
>> there's still plenty of space around each mounting point.
>>
>> I don't know if there's a standard spec for minimum radial clearance
>> around each hole for non-grounded solder points, but on the mobos
>I've
>> used there's no danger of accidental electrical contact after it's
>> been firmly screwed on.
>>
>> Not only PCI and AGP cards, but also the onboard back ports like
>LAN,
>> VGA, parallel, serial, audio, etc. line up with their respective
>> holes.
>>
>> As it seems some of us here have not yet come across this type of
>> case, I compared the height of the dimple with some spare brass
>> standoffs. The dimple on the case I have on hand is slightly shorter
>> than the brass standoff, but there's ample clearance between mobo
>and
>> base plate.
>>
>> > Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure
>if you
>> > mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine
>adjustment
>> > dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.
>> >
>> Actually, my cases are not high-end. They're generally US $20-30
>types
>> *with* PSUs.
>>
>> > I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting
>the areas
>> > around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers
>since 1992.
>> >
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 14, 2004 1:59:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Andy wrote:

> http://store1.yimg.com/I/dealsonic_1818_23208942

Yep. Those sure look an awful lot like the ones in my case.

>
> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 10:28:50 -0800, "JAD" <Kapasitor@coldmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>throw a brand name out there
>>I would like to see an example, for future reference.
>>And All mainboards can be used?
>>he describes them as 'mounds' I don't think this is the same thing
>>your talking about.
>>
>>
>>
>>"Zotin Khuma" <zotin_k@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:304fc392.0411130959.2a337ec3@posting.google.com...
>>
>>>"JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
>>
>>news:<10paumecjc3l514@corp.supernews.com>...
>>
>>>>troll leave...if not .read...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw
>>
>>holes
>>
>>>>>each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the
>>
>>mobo.
>>
>>>>>these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal
>>
>>surface, except
>>
>>>>>where intended.
>>>>
>>>>I still don't agree with this.
>>>>How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
>>>>Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the
>>
>>MB (except
>>
>>>>where the contact is obvious)??.
>>>>
>>>
>>>I've used many such cases. In fact, I just completed building a new
>>>computer an hour ago using a case with just that type of mobo
>>>standoff. The dimple is a little over half an inch wide at the base,
>>>but tapers so that it's much smaller at the top where it meets the
>>>bottom of the mobo. It's wider than the usual brass standoff, but
>>>there's still plenty of space around each mounting point.
>>>
>>>I don't know if there's a standard spec for minimum radial clearance
>>>around each hole for non-grounded solder points, but on the mobos
>>
>>I've
>>
>>>used there's no danger of accidental electrical contact after it's
>>>been firmly screwed on.
>>>
>>>Not only PCI and AGP cards, but also the onboard back ports like
>>
>>LAN,
>>
>>>VGA, parallel, serial, audio, etc. line up with their respective
>>>holes.
>>>
>>>As it seems some of us here have not yet come across this type of
>>>case, I compared the height of the dimple with some spare brass
>>>standoffs. The dimple on the case I have on hand is slightly shorter
>>>than the brass standoff, but there's ample clearance between mobo
>>
>>and
>>
>>>base plate.
>>>
>>>
>>>>Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure
>>
>>if you
>>
>>>>mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine
>>
>>adjustment
>>
>>>>dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Actually, my cases are not high-end. They're generally US $20-30
>>
>>types
>>
>>>*with* PSUs.
>>>
>>>
>>>>I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting
>>
>>the areas
>>
>>>>around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers
>>
>>since 1992.
>>
>
November 15, 2004 12:58:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

hmmmm If that i the typical example i have some fears about that.
those domes look pretty wide at the top...certainly not the diameter of a
standoff/pylon/stansion


"Andy" <1@2.3> wrote in message
news:sgeep01vqljjaoie0d9ia5v97kdr5346qh@4ax.com...
> http://store1.yimg.com/I/dealsonic_1818_23208942
>
> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 10:28:50 -0800, "JAD" <Kapasitor@coldmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >throw a brand name out there
> >I would like to see an example, for future reference.
> >And All mainboards can be used?
> > he describes them as 'mounds' I don't think this is the same thing
> >your talking about.
> >
> >
> >
> >"Zotin Khuma" <zotin_k@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
> >news:304fc392.0411130959.2a337ec3@posting.google.com...
> >> "JAD" <hrhackthatspam@witchiepoo.com> wrote in message
> >news:<10paumecjc3l514@corp.supernews.com>...
> >> > troll leave...if not .read...
> >> >
> >> > >in my case there is a removable plate with mounds that have screw
> >holes
> >> > > each and every mound meets with a factoy mounting point on the
> >mobo.
> >> > > these mounds prevent the mobo from ever contacting a metal
> >surface, except
> >> > > where intended.
> >> >
> >> > I still don't agree with this.
> >> > How do your PCI cards line up with the back?
> >> > Those dimples are narrow enough as not to contact any part of the
> >MB (except
> >> > where the contact is obvious)??.
> >> >
> >> I've used many such cases. In fact, I just completed building a new
> >> computer an hour ago using a case with just that type of mobo
> >> standoff. The dimple is a little over half an inch wide at the base,
> >> but tapers so that it's much smaller at the top where it meets the
> >> bottom of the mobo. It's wider than the usual brass standoff, but
> >> there's still plenty of space around each mounting point.
> >>
> >> I don't know if there's a standard spec for minimum radial clearance
> >> around each hole for non-grounded solder points, but on the mobos
> >I've
> >> used there's no danger of accidental electrical contact after it's
> >> been firmly screwed on.
> >>
> >> Not only PCI and AGP cards, but also the onboard back ports like
> >LAN,
> >> VGA, parallel, serial, audio, etc. line up with their respective
> >> holes.
> >>
> >> As it seems some of us here have not yet come across this type of
> >> case, I compared the height of the dimple with some spare brass
> >> standoffs. The dimple on the case I have on hand is slightly shorter
> >> than the brass standoff, but there's ample clearance between mobo
> >and
> >> base plate.
> >>
> >> > Ok its been awhile since I dabbled in high end cases. I'm not sure
> >if you
> >> > mentioned the exact model, but I have never seen a 'machine
> >adjustment
> >> > dimple' that was narrow enough at the top for this.
> >> >
> >> Actually, my cases are not high-end. They're generally US $20-30
> >types
> >> *with* PSUs.
> >>
> >> > I have always used pylons (brass)+/- nylon push clips(supporting
> >the areas
> >> > around the IDE/floppy/memory slots), haven't used fiber washers
> >since 1992.
> >> >
> >
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 15, 2004 1:19:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message news:<10pcgvl3du32g19@corp.supernews.com>...
> leigon. wrote:
>
> > Ok, so I do have a few bad habits I brought with me from elsewhere
> > I'l admit that
> >
> > It's definatly no high end case (does everyones atx pse almost cover the
> > cooling unit on the cpu?)
>
> If you mean the type that has the PSU mounted on it's side, rather than
> horizontal across the top of the case, that was a common socket 7 layout to
> keep the case shorter, but also a bit wider. Pleeeeenty of room for the
> kinds of heatsinks used on those things. I'd imagine they were also used
> for socket 370 and you actually *can* get a standard slot-1 cart to 'just'
> make it, but not the 'typical' slotket because they're taller. It would be
> a real problem for the larger heatsinks of today.
>
Until about a week ago, I used just such a case for my kids' computer
(sold now). The CPU is mounted behind the PSU. There's only about a
1/2-inch clearance between the CPU fan and the PSU and at first I was
concerned about heat issues, but there seemed to be no alarming temp
rise with an Athlon XP 2400+, stock heatsink-fan and no case fan.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 15, 2004 10:56:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Zotin Khuma wrote:

> David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message news:<10pcgvl3du32g19@corp.supernews.com>...
>
>>leigon. wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Ok, so I do have a few bad habits I brought with me from elsewhere
>>>I'l admit that
>>>
>>>It's definatly no high end case (does everyones atx pse almost cover the
>>>cooling unit on the cpu?)
>>
>>If you mean the type that has the PSU mounted on it's side, rather than
>>horizontal across the top of the case, that was a common socket 7 layout to
>>keep the case shorter, but also a bit wider. Pleeeeenty of room for the
>>kinds of heatsinks used on those things. I'd imagine they were also used
>>for socket 370 and you actually *can* get a standard slot-1 cart to 'just'
>>make it, but not the 'typical' slotket because they're taller. It would be
>>a real problem for the larger heatsinks of today.
>>
>
> Until about a week ago, I used just such a case for my kids' computer
> (sold now). The CPU is mounted behind the PSU. There's only about a
> 1/2-inch clearance between the CPU fan and the PSU and at first I was
> concerned about heat issues, but there seemed to be no alarming temp
> rise with an Athlon XP 2400+, stock heatsink-fan and no case fan.

Interesting. I'd be nervous with no case fan but, if it worked...
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 16, 2004 12:08:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Halon.

Ed Cregger
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 28, 2004 4:40:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I've just scouted through this thread, and I catch out of it:

1) The CO2 extinguisher thing wasn't mentioned. However. I think I
want to keep an eye out for a small CO2 extinguisher. Firstly, no
chemicals that can upset my head nor liver. Secondly, if I use it,
the CO2 in the air won't cause much difficulty -- maybe a little
breathlessness, in which case I open the door. Third, CO2 kills
fires. Finally, the CO2 is cold, to good effect upon something in the
computer that is hot. So CO2 looks better to me than anything else I
know of, and I need one here.

2) Motherboard grounding is a bummer. If you're rebuilding an old
computer then you want to keep tiny sketches in your notebook how it
came apart so you can reassemble it same way: the little paper washers
and etc. ...You *do* keep a notebook, don't you?

3) Ventilation. Before you do anything else, have a common-sense look
at how the ventilation works. I once bought a box and surprise, no
way in it for the air to get *in*. So I cut five large holes in the
side right over the CPU. It's worked fine for some years.

4) Boxes. Cases; cabinets: around here we call them *boxes*.

Cheers -- Martha Adams
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 28, 2004 7:50:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

mha@TheWorld.com (Martha H Adams) wrote:

>I've just scouted through this thread, and I catch out of it:
>
>1) The CO2 extinguisher thing wasn't mentioned. However. I think
>I want to keep an eye out for a small CO2 extinguisher. Firstly,
>no chemicals that can upset my head nor liver. Secondly, if I use
>it, the CO2 in the air won't cause much difficulty -- maybe a
>little breathlessness, in which case I open the door. Third, CO2
>kills fires. Finally, the CO2 is cold, to good effect upon
>something in the computer that is hot.

Roughly speaking (I'm not giving advice), that depends on how quickly
the CO2/whatever changes the temperature. I think that putting out
the fire is what matters.

>2) Motherboard grounding is a bummer.

No, it's not.

> If you're rebuilding an old computer then you want to keep tiny
> sketches in your notebook how it
>came apart so you can reassemble it same way: the little paper
>washers and etc.

Oh brother (or sister).

> ...You *do* keep a notebook, don't you?

No, I have been using digital recorders for years. Yes, I take notes
with that.

Off-topic. For what it's worth. A digital recorder is quite cool IMO
for technical things. At least here (in the United States), the
price, function, quality, and recording time is eclipsing cassette
tape recorders. The improvement is crystal clear IMO if you consider
the convenience of being able to easily access your recordings. For
loud/realistic playback, the computer speaker connector plugs into
the earphone output.

>3) Ventilation. Before you do anything else, have a common-sense
>look at how the ventilation works. I once bought a box and
>surprise, no way in it for the air to get *in*. So I cut five
>large holes in the side right over the CPU. It's worked fine for
>some years.
>
>4) Boxes. Cases; cabinets: around here we call them *boxes*.

Me too. But in this forum, I have referred to them as cases.




>
>Cheers -- Martha Adams
>
>
!