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If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:21:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

......what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.

And which components are likely to be fried?

Cheers,

Fred.

More about : built bang power

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:24:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>
> And which components are likely to be fried?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.
>


i'm guessing you got a part of the mobo shorted to the chassis in which case
you'll be lucky if its only the mobo and psu gone. cpu and ram aswell if
you're unlucky
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:37:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>
> And which components are likely to be fried?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.
>
>

If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent quality PSU
then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't then look on the
bright side, it's still a nice case!


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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:55:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

>
> If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
> incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent quality
> PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't then look on the
> bright side, it's still a nice case!
>

It's an Antec Sonata case which comes with a 380W PSU. Where would I find
the voltage selector switch?

Cheers,

Fred.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:55:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Voltage selector switch is adjacent to power cord
connection. A red slide switch that reads either 110 or 220.
BTW, universal power supplies can be used anywhere in the
world because they electronically select this switch - don't
depend on humans. Universal supplies are standard in laptops,
camcorders, and digital cameras. Many CRT video monitors also
contain universal supplies.

Unfortunately some would respond to your question
erroneously; without first learning basic facts. Any
acceptable computer power supply can be shorted and must not
suffer damage. Every power supply output wire can be shorted
together and still damage must not result. Intel specs even
say how large this shorting wire must be.

So why would another suggest a motherboard shorted to
chassis would cause PSU failure - and RAM & CPU damage?
Things damaged because the computer assembler buys his power
supplies on hype and price rather than using good technical
numbers. Too many computer assemblers only know that if A
mates to B, then it must be so. They don't need know anything
more to be an expert. They buy power supplies missing
essential functions which is why they suffer RAM and CPU
failure. Then they blame anything but themselves - the
technically naive computer assembler - as reason for failure.

If motherboard shorted to chassis causes RAM, CPU, or power
supply failure, then reason for that failure is directly
traceable to the human who bought components. As BigH2K says:
> If it was a decent quality PSU then all your components
> should be fine, ...

Why the pop? Probably a manufacturing defect. Exactly why
a computer assembler has a 3.5 digit multimeter to verify in
but seconds where the problem is located. Procedures
demonstrated previously in "Computer doesnt start at all" in
alt.comp.hardware on 10 Jan 2004 at
http://tinyurl.com/2t69q or
"I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
Feb 2004 at
http://tinyurl.com/yvbw9 .


Fred Finisterre wrote:
> It's an Antec Sonata case which comes with a 380W PSU. Where would
> I find the voltage selector switch?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:04:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

> If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
> incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent
> quality PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't
> then look on the bright side, it's still a nice case!
>

I think you're right. I never noticed the voltage selector switch. It was
set to 110V and I'm in the UK so should have had it set to 230V. Doh!
Bearing in mind the PSU looks like a fairly good one (True 380S), might I
have got away with just blowing the PSU?

Cheers,

Fred.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:06:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cntu90$j1g$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
> >
>> If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
>> incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent quality
>> PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't then look on
>> the bright side, it's still a nice case!
>>
>
> It's an Antec Sonata case which comes with a 380W PSU. Where would I find
> the voltage selector switch?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.
>

Strangely, I have the same case and PSU so I can tell you that there isn't
one on this one. Good thing is if it was a faulty PSU then the rest of your
stuff is ok.

Can't really think of anything other than a PSU fault that could cause that
so you could really do with getting hold of another to test your system
with.


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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:10:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote:

>.....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot
>noise, a flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.

Hopefully you unplugged your computer immediately following that
gunshot noise.

A capacitor can make a loud bang when high voltage is applied to its
leads. I did that accidentally once.

Another possibility is mini terrorists inside of your computer
[kidding].

>And which components are likely to be fried?

Usually I swap components when I want to know what is bad.

Good luck.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:12:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cntuqd$87i$1@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
>> If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
>> incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent
>> quality PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't
>> then look on the bright side, it's still a nice case!
>>
>
> I think you're right. I never noticed the voltage selector switch. It was
> set to 110V and I'm in the UK so should have had it set to 230V. Doh!
> Bearing in mind the PSU looks like a fairly good one (True 380S), might I
> have got away with just blowing the PSU?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.
>
>

OK, so yours DOES have a voltage selector and mine doesn't.

Probably good news I would have thought, have swapped out many PSUs where
this has happened, even when the machines were on and switched over and
never had anything other than the PSU damaged.


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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:13:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Sounds like you blew, at minimum, one or more of the components in the power
supply. In addition, depending on the quality of build of the power supply
unit, you may also have fried the motherboard.

--
DaveW



"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>
> And which components are likely to be fried?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.
>
>
November 23, 2004 5:03:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

I've never seen a computer power supply that did not include the 110/220
selector switch. What brand and model number is the one you know about that
is missing that switch?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:05:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<cntu90$j1g$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk>...
> >
> > If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
> > incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent quality
> > PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't then look on the
> > bright side, it's still a nice case!
> >
>
> It's an Antec Sonata case which comes with a 380W PSU. Where would I find
> the voltage selector switch?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fred.

The voltage selector, if it has one, will be at the rear of the PSU.
It's meant to switch between a 110/115V and a European 230/240-volt
line. If it's set at the lower voltage and you've connected it to your
240V line, what you heard was most probably the main filter capacitors
inside the PSU exploding - probably accompanied by a 'phffft' sound.
One poster here described it as a farting sound.

I've had a few cases like this with customers' computers and in all
cases there was no damage other than to the PSU itself.
November 23, 2004 5:10:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

I looked up the Antec Sonata with 380 Watt power supply. The Antec
literature shows the 110/220 selector switch.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:55:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:E_wod.1583$NU3.778@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>I looked up the Antec Sonata with 380 Watt power supply. The Antec
>literature shows the 110/220 selector switch.
>

Well mine doesn't have one so there :p 

As for you never having seen one that doesn't have a voltage selector well
you must have a very narrow field of experience in such matters. If you
really expect me to dismantle my PC so that I can provide you with a serial
number I suggest you go to bed, late night obviously make you unreasonable
:) 

Only joking with you, it's very common to have PSUs without the selector,
Antec make a UK only model of this PSU and I suppose the switch was omitted
as a cost cutting exercise. You really only need the selector if you're
using it abroad and not many people actually transport their desktop
machined around with them.

Hang on a minute, if you send me a stamped addressed Jiffy Bag I'll send
mine to you to have a look ;) 


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November 23, 2004 6:17:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Like many Americans, I get a little provincial at times. I shouldn't assume
that the whole world uses the exact same design variations as we do.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:59:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"BigH2K" <peter2004@NOTTHISBITblueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message

>As for you never having seen one that doesn't have a voltage
>selector well ...

http://www.antec.com/specs/true330_spe_EU.html

>... it's very common to have PSUs without the selector,

Might be common in the United Kingdom.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:03:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>
> And which components are likely to be fried?


Depends.

If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the motherboard but
doubtful.

If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the motherboard &
CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the memory.
--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:18:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message

>> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
>> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>> And which components are likely to be fried?
>
>
>Depends.
>
>If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the motherboard but
>doubtful.
>
>If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the motherboard &
>CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the memory.

Sounds like a troll (to me).





>--
>
>I.P.Freely
>
>
>
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>From: "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 08:03:39 -0000
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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:34:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"BigH2K" wrote:
> "Papa" wrote:
> >I looked up the Antec Sonata with 380 Watt power supply. The Antec
> >literature shows the 110/220 selector switch.
> >
>
> Well mine doesn't have one so there :p 
>
> As for you never having seen one that doesn't have a voltage selector well
> you must have a very narrow field of experience in such matters. If you
> really expect me to dismantle my PC so that I can provide you with a
serial
> number I suggest you go to bed, late night obviously make you unreasonable
> :) 
>
> Only joking with you, it's very common to have PSUs without the selector,
> Antec make a UK only model of this PSU and I suppose the switch was
omitted
> as a cost cutting exercise. You really only need the selector if you're
> using it abroad and not many people actually transport their desktop
> machined around with them.

I've also seen PSUs with the selector switch, but upon inspection it is
determined that the selector switch isn't wired up to anything inside of the
unit. Probably cheaper to throw them in all units but only wire up the ones
heading to non-US areas.

Jon
November 23, 2004 11:41:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

>
> I've also seen PSUs with the selector switch, but upon inspection it
is
> determined that the selector switch isn't wired up to anything
inside of the
> unit. Probably cheaper to throw them in all units but only wire up
the ones
> heading to non-US areas.
>
> Jon
>

That's one of the craziest things I've heard in awhile. Imagine the
frustration and danger if those PSUs would ever to venture out of the
local.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 12:05:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <cntuqd$87i$1@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk>, Fred Finisterre
<finisterre@gmail.com> writes
>
>> If you're lucky it's just the voltage selector switch on the PSU set
>> incorrectly, in which case your PSU is fried. If it was a decent
>> quality PSU then all your components should be fine, if it wasn't
>> then look on the bright side, it's still a nice case!
>>
>
>I think you're right. I never noticed the voltage selector switch. It was
>set to 110V and I'm in the UK so should have had it set to 230V. Doh!
>Bearing in mind the PSU looks like a fairly good one (True 380S), might I
>have got away with just blowing the PSU?
>
If you're very lucky, you might even have got away with just blowing the
fuse inside the PSU.
--
Thoss
November 23, 2004 12:37:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95A9DFB24B06wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42...
> "BigH2K" <peter2004@NOTTHISBITblueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>>"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
>
>>As for you never having seen one that doesn't have a voltage
>>selector well ...
>
> http://www.antec.com/specs/true330_spe_EU.html
>
>>... it's very common to have PSUs without the selector,
>
> Might be common in the United Kingdom.

I have two Antec Sonata's bought 12 months apart, neither have power supply
selectors ;o)

Steve
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:07:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42...
> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> >"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> >> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
> >> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
> >> And which components are likely to be fried?
> >
> >
> >Depends.
> >
> >If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the motherboard but
> >doubtful.
> >
> >If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the motherboard &
> >CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the memory.
>
> Sounds like a troll (to me).


Nope, I was being serious.
--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:19:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in news:cntuqd$87i$1
@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk:

> I think you're right. I never noticed the voltage selector switch. It was
> set to 110V and I'm in the UK so should have had it set to 230V. Doh!

Are there any regulations regardin selling stuff with the switch set
appropiately for the relevant country? I suspect (just a hunch) legally the
buyer is not completely at fault in this case. Anyone?

--
Lordy
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:24:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>> >"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>
>> >> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot noise, a
>> >> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
>> >> And which components are likely to be fried?
>> >
>> >
>> >Depends.
>> >
>> >If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the motherboard but
>> >doubtful.
>> >
>> >If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the motherboard &
>> >CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the memory.
>>
>> Sounds like a troll (to me).
>
>
>Nope, I was being serious.

Seriously trolling?

What is your opinion based on?




>--
>
>I.P.Freely
>
>
>
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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:29:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>,
jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...


> Seriously trolling?
> What is your opinion based on?

I'm more interested in learning on what basis your trolling theory was
created.

And why are you posting message headers?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:42:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 02:03:15 GMT, "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote:

>I've never seen a computer power supply that did not include the 110/220
>selector switch. What brand and model number is the one you know about that
>is missing that switch?
>

My Zalman PSU doesn't have one. It automatically switches to needed
voltage.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 1:42:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

> Are there any regulations regardin selling stuff with the switch set
> appropiately for the relevant country? I suspect (just a hunch)
> legally the buyer is not completely at fault in this case. Anyone?

Yeah, I was thinking that. i bought it from Ebuyer.com in the UK. Not only
was the voltage select switch set wrong, but it was suppled with a mains
cable that was wrong for the UK. I've noticed Ebuyer selling non-Brit stuff
before (I Bought a Creative MP3 player from them that had a US style mains
plug). I may try and claim from them, but they'll probably claim that there
there is a warning in the case manual (and to be fair there is). I've had
loads of PCs before, and they've either not had a voltage selector switch,
or if they have, it was set to 230V and I was lucky. I feel quite foolish
not to have spotted this.

Fred.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 2:42:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42...
> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> >"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
> >> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> >> >"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
> >>
> >> >> .....what's the most likely thing I did wrong? I had a gunshot
noise, a
> >> >> flash, and smoke coming from (near) the PSU.
> >> >> And which components are likely to be fried?
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >Depends.
> >> >
> >> >If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the motherboard but
> >> >doubtful.
> >> >
> >> >If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the
motherboard &
> >> >CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the memory.
> >>
> >> Sounds like a troll (to me).
> >
> >
> >Nope, I was being serious.
>
> Seriously trolling?
>
> What is your opinion based on?

My own experience with around 400-500 PCs purchased from an insurance
clearing auction. Around 90% of the AMD systems with blown PSUs (assume from
power spikes) had dead motherboards, CPUs, Memory or combinations thereof
compared to around 10-15% of Intel based PCs with dead PSUs. Now no-one can
tell me that's a co-incidence and speaking to other dealers who also buy at
the same auction they all report the same experiences.

Why do you have this fascination with posting the headers of my messages?



--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 3:51:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com> wrote:
>jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...
>
>> Seriously trolling?
>> What is your opinion based on?
>
>I'm more interested in learning on what basis your trolling theory
>was created.

Sounds like a troll to me.

>And why are you posting message headers?

I posted the author's message header partly because I thought he was
trolling.




>
>
>
>Path: newssvr30.news.prodigy.com!newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!newscon03.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!not-for-mail
>From: Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 10:29:26 -0000
>Organization: Posting_@_Home_@s_@n_individu@l
>Lines: 11
>Message-ID: <MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net>
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>
>Mime-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-15"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de 2XvMiIae7RXHHdmfF1K8yQkjKavuzLDFy/7/Dssrr2YFGuVwhy
>X-Newsreader: MicroPlanet Gravity v2.60
>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:422722
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 4:13:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
....
>> >> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:

....

>> >> >If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the
>> >> >motherboard but doubtful.
>> >> >If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the
>> >> >motherboard & CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the
>> >> >memory.

>> What is your opinion based on?
>
>My own experience with around 400-500 PCs purchased from an
>insurance clearing auction. Around 90% of the AMD systems with
>blown PSUs (assume from power spikes) had dead motherboards, CPUs,
>Memory or combinations thereof compared to around 10-15% of Intel
>based PCs with dead PSUs. Now no-one can tell me that's a
>co-incidence and speaking to other dealers who also buy at the same
>auction they all report the same experiences.

Thanks. I mainly wanted to know if you had any technical reasons,
like what is the difference between the Intel/AMD power supplies and
mainboard power circuits.

It probably is something other than coincidence, however there must
be something different in order for that to happen. There are
possibilities I can think of which would mean the difference had
little or nothing to do with whether the systems were Intel or AMD
based.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 4:21:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...

[...]

> >I'm more interested in learning on what basis your trolling theory
> >was created.
>
> Sounds like a troll to me

Well, thanks for the clear and concise explanation.

> >And why are you posting message headers?
>
> I posted the author's message header partly because I thought he was
> trolling.

To achieve what?

> >Path: newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...

ROFLMAO ... weirdo alert!
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 4:35:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA4971091Awisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> >"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
> ...
> >> >> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>
> ...
>
> >> >> >If an Intel system, probably the PSU and possibly the
> >> >> >motherboard but doubtful.
> >> >> >If an AMD system, probably the PSU and also likely that the
> >> >> >motherboard & CPU has gone along with it, possibly also the
> >> >> >memory.
>
> >> What is your opinion based on?
> >
> >My own experience with around 400-500 PCs purchased from an
> >insurance clearing auction. Around 90% of the AMD systems with
> >blown PSUs (assume from power spikes) had dead motherboards, CPUs,
> >Memory or combinations thereof compared to around 10-15% of Intel
> >based PCs with dead PSUs. Now no-one can tell me that's a
> >co-incidence and speaking to other dealers who also buy at the same
> >auction they all report the same experiences.
>
> Thanks. I mainly wanted to know if you had any technical reasons,
> like what is the difference between the Intel/AMD power supplies and
> mainboard power circuits.
>
> It probably is something other than coincidence, however there must
> be something different in order for that to happen. There are
> possibilities I can think of which would mean the difference had
> little or nothing to do with whether the systems were Intel or AMD
> based.


Doubt it would be anything to do with power supplies as most are not
tailored to AMD or Intel but are fairly standard.

I do remember reading somewhere in a newsgroup that Intel CPUs have some
sort of inbuilt voltage protection or something which is why they are more
likely to survive a power surge. As they say you get what you pay for and
AMD being so much cheaper etc.

Actually the sub 1Ghz AMD CPUs tended to me more resiliant while the Athlon
XP series suffered a near 100% death rate, I can't remember one of those
being OK from a failed PC.
--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 4:53:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Troll.

Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Path: newssvr12.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm03.news.prodigy.com!newsdst01.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!atl-c02.usenetserver.com!news.usenetserver.com!peer01.cox.net!cox.net!in.100proofnews.com!in.100proofnews.com!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!not-for-mail
>From: Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 13:21:28 -0000
>Organization: Posting_@_Home_@s_@n_individu@l
>Lines: 22
>Message-ID: <MPG.1c0d49af3a38e63989d5c@news.individual.net>
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>
>Mime-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-15"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de MaiLwO6JM/SrsDZ3TQk3ggZJHbMpLqXzPqs0ogxp9oPPpqgS25
>X-Newsreader: MicroPlanet Gravity v2.60
>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:422731
>
>In article <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
>jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...
>
>[...]
>
>> >I'm more interested in learning on what basis your trolling theory
>> >was created.
>>
>> Sounds like a troll to me
>
>Well, thanks for the clear and concise explanation.
>
>> >And why are you posting message headers?
>>
>> I posted the author's message header partly because I thought he was
>> trolling.
>
>To achieve what?
>
>> >Path: newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
>
>ROFLMAO ... weirdo alert!
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:21:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44>,
jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...

> Troll

don't be so ridiculous

you accused someone of trolling, i asked why; you couldn't justify it,
persisted in posting unnecessary headers; then carried on in
conversation with them as if it were all perfectly normal!

Like i said, weirdo alert.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:34:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
> Troll.

Do you even know what a Troll is?

Path:
news-text.dial.pipex.com!bnewshfeed00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!master.news.eu.uu.ne
t!lnewsspool00.lnd.ops.eu.uu.net!lnewsinpeer01.lnd.ops.eu.uu.net!emea.uu.net
!newsfeed01.sul.t-online.de!newsfeed00.sul.t-online.de!t-online.de!border2.n
ntp.dca.giganews.com!border1.nntp.dca.giganews.com!nntp.giganews.com!prodigy
..com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!postmaster.news.prodigy.com!new
ssvr12.news.prodigy.com.POSTED!67420556!not-for-mail
Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
From: John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing>
References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>
<41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>
<Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>
<41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>
<Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42>
<MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net>
<Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>
<MPG.1c0d49af3a38e63989d5c@news.individual.net>
Organization: sometimes
Message-ID: <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44>
User-Agent: Xnews/06.08.25
Lines: 45
NNTP-Posting-Host: 69.153.48.93
X-Complaints-To: abuse@prodigy.net
X-Trace: newssvr12.news.prodigy.com 1101218027 ST000 69.153.48.93 (Tue, 23
Nov 2004 08:53:47 EST)
NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 08:53:47 EST
X-UserInfo1:
[[PAPDCAO@UMRULXMZOT_VTB\Z_HPUDO@HTHOCULF@^PGDTFOG[]FKKZE\]^HRWI[FCWJF^NB^[D
_DSBR^RC^QPFTFUCYRDIH@\FCQKBITUT@EP_[CAFHTC@GLDKZHBMGDXCJINMCA\]GG[RH\^MOM[\
BK[NVPWKYAYIPOG@SK@ZA]DE[\AP]_DFU^T]A\VM
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 13:53:47 GMT
Xref: news-text.dial.pipex.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:418587
uk.comp.homebuilt:130142





--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:50:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Troll.

Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Path: newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!newscon03.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!not-for-mail
>From: Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 14:21:30 -0000
>Organization: Posting_@_Home_@s_@n_individu@l
>Lines: 13
>Message-ID: <MPG.1c0d57c26eb3bb15989d5d@news.individual.net>
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48> <MPG.1c0d49af3a38e63989d5c@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44>
>Mime-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-15"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de L3FJpkhf3ADgIv2CTbgcRwwsqoIMnJy73FuFM6JVEfGDKBryEG
>X-Newsreader: MicroPlanet Gravity v2.60
>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:422735
>
>In article <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44>,
>jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...
>
>> Troll
>
>don't be so ridiculous
>
>you accused someone of trolling, i asked why; you couldn't justify it,
>persisted in posting unnecessary headers; then carried on in
>conversation with them as if it were all perfectly normal!
>
>Like i said, weirdo alert.
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 5:58:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95AA59E2820Dwisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...


> Troll

Go read between the lines, arsehole.
http://cerap.univ-paris1.fr/preseau/3-fingers.jpg


*plonk*
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:08:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:

....

>> >My own experience with around 400-500 PCs purchased from an
>> >insurance clearing auction. Around 90% of the AMD systems with
>> >blown PSUs (assume from power spikes) had dead motherboards,
>> >CPUs, Memory or combinations thereof compared to around 10-15%
>> >of Intel based PCs with dead PSUs. Now no-one can tell me that's
>> >a co-incidence and speaking to other dealers who also buy at the
>> >same auction they all report the same experiences.
>>
>> Thanks. I mainly wanted to know if you had any technical reasons,
>> like what is the difference between the Intel/AMD power supplies
>> and mainboard power circuits.
>> It probably is something other than coincidence, however there
>> must be something different in order for that to happen. There
>> are possibilities I can think of which would mean the difference
>> had little or nothing to do with whether the systems were Intel
>> or AMD based.
>
>
>Doubt it would be anything to do with power supplies as most are
>not tailored to AMD or Intel but are fairly standard.

But that would have everything to do with what power supplies were
on the different systems.

>I do remember reading somewhere in a newsgroup that Intel CPUs have
>some sort of inbuilt voltage protection or something which is why
>they are more likely to survive a power surge.

That would just depend on the system. As far as I know, any power
supply related thing that you can put into an Intel system you can
put into an AMD system.

>As they say you get what you pay for and AMD being so much cheaper
>etc.

Were they?

>Actually the sub 1Ghz AMD CPUs tended to me more resiliant while
>the Athlon XP series suffered a near 100% death rate, I can't
>remember one of those being OK from a failed PC.

So then you would say that slower AMD CPUs can handle power surges
better? Good grief.






>--
>
>I.P.Freely
>
>
>
>Path: newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!newsswing.news.prodigy.com!
prodigy.net!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!news-
FFM2.ecrc.net!newsfeed00.sul.t-online.de!t-online.de!news.zanker.org!
feeder.enertel.nl!nntpfeed-01.ops.asmr-01.energis-idc.net!surfnet.nl!
bnewsoutpeer00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!bnewsinpeer00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!
bnewspost00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!emea.uu.net!not-for-mail
>From: "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428
$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@
151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>
<Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a32260$0$10003
$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA4971091Awisdomfolly@
151.164.30.44>
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 13:35:51 -0000
>X-Priority: 3
>X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2800.1437
>X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1441
>Lines: 52
>Message-ID: <41a33cc4$0$10974$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>
>NNTP-Posting-Host: 81-178-86-45.dsl.pipex.com
>X-Trace: 1101216964 news-text.dial.pipex.com 10974 81.178.86.45:1637
>X-Complaints-To: abuse@uk.uu.net
>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-
homebuilt:422732
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:26:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message

>> Troll.
>
>Do you even know what a Troll is?

Yes.


>
>
>
>
>--
>
>I.P.Freely
>
>
>
>Path: newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!newscon03.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!news.glorb.com!newsgate.cistron.nl!news.tele.dk!news.tele.dk!small.news.tele.dk!lnewsoutpeer00.lnd.ops.eu.uu.net!lnewsinpeer00.lnd.ops.eu.uu.net!bnewsoutpeer00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!bnewsinpeer01.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!bnewspost00.bru.ops.eu.uu.net!emea.uu.net!not-for-mail
>From: "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48> <MPG.1c0d49af3a38e63989d5c@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44>
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 14:34:45 -0000
>X-Priority: 3
>X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2800.1437
>X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1441
>Lines: 50
>Message-ID: <41a34a92$0$2264$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>
>NNTP-Posting-Host: 81-178-86-45.dsl.pipex.com
>X-Trace: 1101220499 news-text.dial.pipex.com 2264 81.178.86.45:1785
>X-Complaints-To: abuse@uk.uu.net
>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:422736
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:28:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Troll.

Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Path: newssvr11.news.prodigy.com!newscon03.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!not-for-mail
>From: Tx2 <tx2newscollection@hotmail.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt
>Subject: Re: If a just built PC goes bang on power-up...
>Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 14:58:14 -0000
>Organization: Posting_@_Home_@s_@n_individu@l
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>References: <cnts9d$4b5$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk> <41a2ef0e$0$15428$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA178424622wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <41a30c1a$0$29084$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com> <Xns95AA2CE7C46D3wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42> <MPG.1c0d2164edcb4685989d55@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA45D41B7B4wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48> <MPG.1c0d49af3a38e63989d5c@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA5059AEB45wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44> <MPG.1c0d57c26eb3bb15989d5d@news.individual.net> <Xns95AA59E2820Dwisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>
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>In article <Xns95AA59E2820Dwisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
>jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing, a.k.a John Doe says...
>
>
>> Troll
>
>Go read between the lines, arsehole.
>http://cerap.univ-paris1.fr/preseau/3-fingers.jpg
>
>
>*plonk*
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:33:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA5D0ADD89Bwisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> >"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
> >> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>
> ...
>
> >> >My own experience with around 400-500 PCs purchased from an
> >> >insurance clearing auction. Around 90% of the AMD systems with
> >> >blown PSUs (assume from power spikes) had dead motherboards,
> >> >CPUs, Memory or combinations thereof compared to around 10-15%
> >> >of Intel based PCs with dead PSUs. Now no-one can tell me that's
> >> >a co-incidence and speaking to other dealers who also buy at the
> >> >same auction they all report the same experiences.
> >>
> >> Thanks. I mainly wanted to know if you had any technical reasons,
> >> like what is the difference between the Intel/AMD power supplies
> >> and mainboard power circuits.
> >> It probably is something other than coincidence, however there
> >> must be something different in order for that to happen. There
> >> are possibilities I can think of which would mean the difference
> >> had little or nothing to do with whether the systems were Intel
> >> or AMD based.
> >
> >
> >Doubt it would be anything to do with power supplies as most are
> >not tailored to AMD or Intel but are fairly standard.
>
> But that would have everything to do with what power supplies were
> on the different systems.
>
> >I do remember reading somewhere in a newsgroup that Intel CPUs have
> >some sort of inbuilt voltage protection or something which is why
> >they are more likely to survive a power surge.
>
> That would just depend on the system. As far as I know, any power
> supply related thing that you can put into an Intel system you can
> put into an AMD system.
>
> >As they say you get what you pay for and AMD being so much cheaper
> >etc.
>
> Were they?
>
> >Actually the sub 1Ghz AMD CPUs tended to me more resiliant while
> >the Athlon XP series suffered a near 100% death rate, I can't
> >remember one of those being OK from a failed PC.
>
> So then you would say that slower AMD CPUs can handle power surges
> better? Good grief.


I am just putting into writing my own experiences. Would you rather me lie?

--

I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:33:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Experience without basic theory makes one his own worst
enemy. Important facts were posted previously. No properly
constructed power supply can damage RAM, motherboard, and
CPU. If one's observation are contrary, then one has
demonstrated how many computers are built by computer
assemblers with only a bean counter mentality. Computers
built on monetary considerations rather than using basic
technical knowledge. The lesson: buy power supplies that are
not dumped into the economy (because so many computer
assemblers don't have fundamental knowledge).

Important expression is 'over voltage protector'. Regardless
of voltage selector switch, no damage must occur beyond the
PSU. That was even required 30 years ago. Basic power supply
knowledge makes obvious what BigH2K posted:
> If it was a decent quality PSU then all your components
> should be fine, ...

Experience without fundamental knowledge can result in wild
and erroneous speculation. A power supply that damages
computer components was defective when purchased and exists
because the computer assembler never first learned basic power
supply fundamentals.

"I.P.Freely" wrote:
> "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
> news:Xns95AA5D0ADD89Bwisdomfolly@151.164.30.44...
> ...
>> So then you would say that slower AMD CPUs can handle power surges
>> better? Good grief.
>
> I am just putting into writing my own experiences. Would you
> rather me lie?
>
> --
>
> I.P.Freely
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 6:33:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote in message news:<41a3585f$0$10003$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>...

.......<snip>.......
>
> I am just putting into writing my own experiences. Would you rather me lie?

Speaking of personal experiences, here's mine. Three of the computers
I assembled for friends suffered lightning strikes this year, all of
them Athlon XPs linked by a neighborhood network.

The lightning bolt partially vapourised a (fortunately) disused
cordless phone antenna on the roof of one of them. Smoke rose from the
house and neighbors ran to see if anyone was hurt. One computer had a
discrete LAN card which was destroyed while the other two had
integrated LAN ports and the motherboards had to be replaced - mobo
chips were literally blown apart and the network switch was a charred
mess. But the CPUs and other components all survived and everything
ran as usual the next day.

Another computer, also an Athlon XP that I built for a local cable TV
company, was damaged last year in a freak accident that caused 60V AC
to be fed back to the computer via the video signal link. The mobo
also had chips blown up and had to be replaced along with the PSU, HDD
and RAM. The CPU survived and is still going strong today.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 8:57:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Fred Finisterre" <finisterre@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:cnv47d$gjn$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
> > Are there any regulations regardin selling stuff with the switch set
> > appropiately for the relevant country? I suspect (just a hunch)
> > legally the buyer is not completely at fault in this case. Anyone?
>
> Yeah, I was thinking that. i bought it from Ebuyer.com in the UK. Not only
> was the voltage select switch set wrong, but it was suppled with a mains
> cable that was wrong for the UK. I've noticed Ebuyer selling non-Brit
stuff
> before (I Bought a Creative MP3 player from them that had a US style mains
> plug). I may try and claim from them, but they'll probably claim that
there
> there is a warning in the case manual (and to be fair there is). I've had
> loads of PCs before, and they've either not had a voltage selector switch,
> or if they have, it was set to 230V and I was lucky. I feel quite foolish
> not to have spotted this.

Tis a silly thing to overlook, but I seem to recall reading other people had
done this on one of the Ebuyer product reviews, think it was one of the
cheap cases when I was looking for a PSU. So you're a bit daft, but on the
bright side, you're not the only one :) 
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 9:18:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA59E2820Dwisdomfolly@151.164.30.48...
> Troll.

Top-posting weirdo!

Tony
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 10:27:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Zotin Khuma" <zotin_k@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
news:304fc392.0411231241.485af2ea@posting.google.com...
> "I.P.Freely" <i.p.freely@spamblockdsl.pipex.com> wrote in message
> news:<41a3585f$0$10003$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com>...
>
> ......<snip>.......
>>
>> I am just putting into writing my own experiences. Would you rather me
>> lie?
>
> Speaking of personal experiences, here's mine. Three of the computers
> I assembled for friends suffered lightning strikes this year, all of
> them Athlon XPs linked by a neighborhood network.
>
> The lightning bolt partially vapourised a (fortunately) disused
> cordless phone antenna on the roof of one of them. Smoke rose from the
> house and neighbors ran to see if anyone was hurt. One computer had a
> discrete LAN card which was destroyed while the other two had
> integrated LAN ports and the motherboards had to be replaced - mobo
> chips were literally blown apart and the network switch was a charred
> mess. But the CPUs and other components all survived and everything
> ran as usual the next day.
>
> Another computer, also an Athlon XP that I built for a local cable TV
> company, was damaged last year in a freak accident that caused 60V AC
> to be fed back to the computer via the video signal link. The mobo
> also had chips blown up and had to be replaced along with the PSU, HDD
> and RAM. The CPU survived and is still going strong today.

I once had a bolt of lightning shoot out of my floppy drive, bounce off my
cat, and then into my dog. Now my dog can fly, and my cat can make herself
invisible whenever she wants to. Oh yeah, now both the dog and cat are able
to talk now too.
;-)
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:17:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <cnv47d$gjn$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk>, Fred Finisterre
<finisterre@gmail.com> writes

>Yeah, I was thinking that. i bought it from Ebuyer.com in the UK. Not only
>was the voltage select switch set wrong, but it was suppled with a mains
>cable that was wrong for the UK. I've noticed Ebuyer selling non-Brit stuff
>before (I Bought a Creative MP3 player from them that had a US style mains
>plug). I may try and claim from them, but they'll probably claim that there
>there is a warning in the case manual (and to be fair there is).

I disagree. If it's sold for use in the UK, it has to be suitable for
its intended market, therefore it should be sold with the switch
correctly set.

In your situation, I'd change the switch to 230V and raise a RMA with
ebuyer. Just say the PSU went bang on power up (this is a fairly common
failure mode even when the switch is correctly set); don't tell them the
switch was wrong.

The Antec True 380 is a nice PSU, it'd be worth getting a replacement
under warranty. They're almost 60 quid new.

--
..sigmonster on vacation
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:19:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95AA6065B9C20wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>, John Doe
<jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> writes
>Troll.

*plonk*

--
..sigmonster on vacation
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
November 23, 2004 11:42:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>From: Trout fish@no.email

>On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 02:03:15 GMT, "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote:
>
>>I've never seen a computer power supply that did not include the 110/220
>>selector switch. What brand and model number is the one you know about that
>>is missing that switch?
>>
>
>My Zalman PSU doesn't have one. It automatically switches to needed
>voltage.

My Thermaltake psu doesn't have a switch either and is automatic.
!