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Added more RAM, now CPU won't start!!??

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 3:05:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have an Intel Celeron 1.4 Gig computer, running XP,
with only 128MB SDRAM. Computer was a little sluggish
and so I went out and got more RAM. 512MB of SDRAM
today, that's the max amount of RAM for the CPU. I
took out the 128 and put in the 512. I went to start
the computer and it starts normal for about 2 secs.
and then nothing. I hear one beep and normal lights
on front of CPU at first. Then the CPU is just "on" with
nothing happening. The back fan is on if that means
anything.
Then I removed the new RAM and put the old RAM in.
The same thing happens and the computer won't
start. The computer worked fine up until 40 mins ago.
I unplugged the whole CPU and waited a while before
changing out the RAM.

Any ideas would be extremely apprciated!!!!! Thanks!

More about : added ram cpu start

November 25, 2004 3:05:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

reset configuration data in the bios after you install the ram.


"herbiehusker" <husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
message news:41a5682a$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
> I have an Intel Celeron 1.4 Gig computer, running XP,
> with only 128MB SDRAM. Computer was a little sluggish
> and so I went out and got more RAM. 512MB of SDRAM
> today, that's the max amount of RAM for the CPU. I
> took out the 128 and put in the 512. I went to start
> the computer and it starts normal for about 2 secs.
> and then nothing. I hear one beep and normal lights
> on front of CPU at first. Then the CPU is just "on" with
> nothing happening. The back fan is on if that means
> anything.
> Then I removed the new RAM and put the old RAM in.
> The same thing happens and the computer won't
> start. The computer worked fine up until 40 mins ago.
> I unplugged the whole CPU and waited a while before
> changing out the RAM.
>
> Any ideas would be extremely apprciated!!!!! Thanks!
>
November 25, 2004 4:03:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (herbiehusker) wrote:

>I have an Intel Celeron 1.4 Gig computer, running XP,
>with only 128MB SDRAM. Computer was a little sluggish
>and so I went out and got more RAM. 512MB of SDRAM
>today, that's the max amount of RAM for the CPU. I
>took out the 128 and put in the 512. I went to start
>the computer and it starts normal for about 2 secs.
>and then nothing. I hear one beep and normal lights
>on front of CPU at first. Then the CPU is just "on" with
>nothing happening. The back fan is on if that means
>anything.
>Then I removed the new RAM and put the old RAM in.
>The same thing happens and the computer won't
>start. The computer worked fine up until 40 mins ago.
>I unplugged the whole CPU and waited a while before
>changing out the RAM.
>
>Any ideas would be extremely apprciated!!!!! Thanks!

I would suggest the most likely problem is you have dislodged a cable or
card somewhere in the case.

Start by checking this and report back with any results.

Hope this helps

Andy
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 5:11:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Thanks guys for the help.

I don't get anything on the computer screen. No BIOS or anything. The
monitor says it's working fine and to check the CPU.

And Tweek, you are right, the mobo has the 810e chipset so 512 won't
work. That' good to know now, thanks for that. So will putting in the
512 overkill the motherboard since it can only take two 256?

I double checked all the cables and they are all seated fine. I also
put the original RAM back in and it is seated fine. But still nothing
happens.

The hard drive light on the front of the CPU will light up a couple
times real quick before nothing else happens. Also, the light on the
CD drive blinks throughout the process. The weird thing is the light
around the power on/off switch will not come on at all, even though
the hard drive light does come on. The CPU does beep once before no
other sounds are heard at startup.

I completely unplugged the CPU before I even took the case off. I
touched a lot of metal before going inside the CPU to prevent static
and only touched the outside wide edges of the RAM when inserting it.
I read on a website of how to install new RAM that that was a good way
to prevent static charges.

But why won't the original RAM etc. . . work now?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 5:41:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Lights on CD-Rom and disk drive say that computers inside
those components are working. Your description suggests
motherboard computer is not working.

Number of possibilities - all of which demonstrate, for
example, why the most reliable cars are those that keep humans
outside the engine compartment.

Something has been moved and is now causing motherboard
failure. For example, a minimal configuration - remove RAM,
keyboard, mouse, monitor - should still result in CPU beeping
speaker. First just remove all RAM and power up. Speaker
should at least beep an error code.

You don't even know power supply is working. Fans can spin
and disk drive computer flashes LED - and still power supply
is not working. After confirming everything is properly
seated, that nothing conductive has been dropped inside, and
after doing a BIOS reset (find the jumper), then no
alternative but to begin a process of confirming what is and
is not working. That means starting with the power supply -
the one device that can cause all sorts of other strange
problems. Procedure done faster and conclusively with a 3.5
digit multimeter. Procedure provided later if still required.

Good luck and report back.

herbiehusker wrote:
> Thanks guys for the help.
>
> I don't get anything on the computer screen. No BIOS or anything. The
> monitor says it's working fine and to check the CPU.
>
> And Tweek, you are right, the mobo has the 810e chipset so 512 won't
> work. That' good to know now, thanks for that. So will putting in the
> 512 overkill the motherboard since it can only take two 256?
>
> I double checked all the cables and they are all seated fine. I also
> put the original RAM back in and it is seated fine. But still nothing
> happens.
>
> The hard drive light on the front of the CPU will light up a couple
> times real quick before nothing else happens. Also, the light on the
> CD drive blinks throughout the process. The weird thing is the light
> around the power on/off switch will not come on at all, even though
> the hard drive light does come on. The CPU does beep once before no
> other sounds are heard at startup.
>
> I completely unplugged the CPU before I even took the case off. I
> touched a lot of metal before going inside the CPU to prevent static
> and only touched the outside wide edges of the RAM when inserting it.
> I read on a website of how to install new RAM that that was a good way
> to prevent static charges.
>
> But why won't the original RAM etc. . . work now?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 6:18:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> But it doesn't explain why the problem's still there when this
> person puts the 128 meg stick of RAM back in.

Yep, that's what I'm baffled with.

So let's say I brought a static charge to the computer when I went to
change out the RAM. What would be the consequence of that? Would it
fry my motherboard? Would that cause things to happen to my computer
where I can't start it like is what is happening to me now with the
original RAM back in? I've read where you should hear beeps from the
motherboard telling you that RAM is bad or something else is bad but I
hear one beep at the very beginning of the computer starting up and
it's the same beep I hear at the beginning of starting the computer up
when it is running fine.

/thank goodness for Thanksgiving Day sales tomorrow if I blew
something up
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 8:12:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

A lot of socket 370 Celeron machines were built with motherboards that use
the Intel 810e chipset. If that is the case, the maximum amount of ram the
board will take is two 256mb low density modules. Each module needs to have
sixteen chips on it, eight on each side. That may be your problem.

"herbiehusker" <husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
message news:41a5682a$1_4@alt.athenanews.com...
>I have an Intel Celeron 1.4 Gig computer, running XP,
> with only 128MB SDRAM. Computer was a little sluggish
> and so I went out and got more RAM. 512MB of SDRAM
> today, that's the max amount of RAM for the CPU. I
> took out the 128 and put in the 512. I went to start
> the computer and it starts normal for about 2 secs.
> and then nothing. I hear one beep and normal lights
> on front of CPU at first. Then the CPU is just "on" with
> nothing happening. The back fan is on if that means
> anything.
> Then I removed the new RAM and put the old RAM in.
> The same thing happens and the computer won't
> start. The computer worked fine up until 40 mins ago.
> I unplugged the whole CPU and waited a while before
> changing out the RAM.
>
> Any ideas would be extremely apprciated!!!!! Thanks!
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 9:36:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

herbiehusker wrote:
> I have an Intel Celeron 1.4 Gig computer, running XP,
> with only 128MB SDRAM. Computer was a little sluggish
> and so I went out and got more RAM. 512MB of SDRAM
> today, that's the max amount of RAM for the CPU.

Nothing to do with the CPU, the motherboard (and in some cases the
operating system) restrict the amount of RAM.

> I
> took out the 128 and put in the 512. I went to start
> the computer and it starts normal for about 2 secs.
> and then nothing. I hear one beep and normal lights
> on front of CPU at first. Then the CPU is just "on" with
> nothing happening. The back fan is on if that means
> anything.

There are no lights on a CPU.

> Then I removed the new RAM and put the old RAM in.
> The same thing happens and the computer won't
> start. The computer worked fine up until 40 mins ago.
> I unplugged the whole CPU and waited a while before
> changing out the RAM.

Did you take precautions against static electricity damaging your
components? Did you completely disconnect the power cord? Have you tried
to reseat the video card? Do you get any video signal in the "normal for
about 2 secs." period?

>
> Any ideas would be extremely apprciated!!!!! Thanks!
>


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 9:45:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> A lot of socket 370 Celeron machines were built with motherboards that use
> the Intel 810e chipset. If that is the case, the maximum amount of ram the
> board will take is two 256mb low density modules. Each module needs to have
> sixteen chips on it, eight on each side. That may be your problem.

But it doesn't explain why the problem's still there when this
person puts the 128 meg stick of RAM back in.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 11:07:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

If static discharged into computer, well, no one can say
(with any accuracy) what did and did not happen. For example,
CMOS ICs have internal protection that makes damage unlikely -
or less likely. But first we must know what the incoming and
outgoing paths of that discharge were. For example, the
incoming path could have been your hands. Where on
motherboard did that discharge occur? Many static discharges
are not apparent. Some can take paths that are not
destructive causing some computer assemblers to claim static
protection is not necessary. Other static discharge can do in
the complete board - again depending on the strength of that
discharge and the path (incoming and outgoing) of that
electrical current.

For example, I did a bad. I discharged into the ethernet
cable. That particular discharge was so violent as to pass
through isolation transformer and damage the ethernet driver
interface chip. I confirmed it with the o'scope (to provide
some idea how technically informed my recommendations are
based and what I require to make such a definitive
conclusion).

Now back to your problem. Previously posted is how one
solved problems in a step by step (organized and informed)
process. Possible to do damage to motherboard if RAM is not
carefully installed - assuming other marginal conditions (ie
slightly bent pin) exists. Not likely, but possible. Also
possible that other unrelated failures occurred
simultaneously. Anyone can speculate numerous failures as so
many have done. To be informed, one first obtains facts.
What happens when the system is started with no RAM - a very
important symptom?

herbiehusker wrote:
> Yep, that's what I'm baffled with.
>
> So let's say I brought a static charge to the computer when I went to
> change out the RAM. What would be the consequence of that? Would it
> fry my motherboard? Would that cause things to happen to my computer
> where I can't start it like is what is happening to me now with the
> original RAM back in? I've read where you should hear beeps from the
> motherboard telling you that RAM is bad or something else is bad but I
> hear one beep at the very beginning of the computer starting up and
> it's the same beep I hear at the beginning of starting the computer up
> when it is running fine.
>
> /thank goodness for Thanksgiving Day sales tomorrow if I blew
> something up
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 11:16:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

oops. didn't see that part of his post.

"Al Smith" <invalid@address.com> wrote in message
news:wLppd.185212$Np3.7517418@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>> A lot of socket 370 Celeron machines were built with motherboards that
>> use the Intel 810e chipset. If that is the case, the maximum amount of
>> ram the board will take is two 256mb low density modules. Each module
>> needs to have sixteen chips on it, eight on each side. That may be your
>> problem.
>
> But it doesn't explain why the problem's still there when this person puts
> the 128 meg stick of RAM back in.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 11:20:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

It won't take the 512mb module at all because by it's nature it is a high
density part. Two low density modules are all it will take. I don't see how
it could kill the mainboard though. I would suggest putting your 128 back
in, unplugging the machine from the wall and pulling the cmos battery for
awhile. Put it back in after a few hours and try again. I have a P4 board
that someone gave me that would not post. He replaced the board and swapped
the cpu and battery into the new one. I had it for a couple of weeks before
I did anything with it. I put a cpu, battery and ram in it and it seems to
work fine now.

"herbiehusker" <husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
message news:41a62e6c$1_2@alt.athenanews.com...
> Thanks guys for the help.
>
> I don't get anything on the computer screen. No BIOS or anything. The
> monitor says it's working fine and to check the CPU.
>
> And Tweek, you are right, the mobo has the 810e chipset so 512 won't
> work. That' good to know now, thanks for that. So will putting in the
> 512 overkill the motherboard since it can only take two 256?
>
> I double checked all the cables and they are all seated fine. I also
> put the original RAM back in and it is seated fine. But still nothing
> happens.
>
> The hard drive light on the front of the CPU will light up a couple
> times real quick before nothing else happens. Also, the light on the
> CD drive blinks throughout the process. The weird thing is the light
> around the power on/off switch will not come on at all, even though
> the hard drive light does come on. The CPU does beep once before no
> other sounds are heard at startup.
>
> I completely unplugged the CPU before I even took the case off. I
> touched a lot of metal before going inside the CPU to prevent static
> and only touched the outside wide edges of the RAM when inserting it.
> I read on a website of how to install new RAM that that was a good way
> to prevent static charges.
>
> But why won't the original RAM etc. . . work now?
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2004 11:22:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

if you are geeting one beep, thaat is the post beep. power on self test.
the mobo gives that if everything plugged into the mobo is ok. the logic
then looks out chanel one eide and if it finds an operating system loads it.
it sounds like all is well until operating system starts to load. check
cables to be sure not loose at hard drive or mobo. if have extra, just
replace to be sure or swap with one running cdrom.

do you have video? if not, reseat video card. Make sure monitor cable is
good and plugged in at both ends. memory may be red herring here. could be
alls well but monitor bad. many times it is simple things causing errors,
not complex ones.

also. watch keyboard when you power up. if you get keyboard flash then
mobo and cpu are good.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 2:12:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> I don't get anything on the computer screen. No BIOS or anything. The
> monitor says it's working fine and to check the CPU.
>
> And Tweek, you are right, the mobo has the 810e chipset so 512 won't
> work. That' good to know now, thanks for that. So will putting in the
> 512 overkill the motherboard since it can only take two 256?
>
> I double checked all the cables and they are all seated fine. I also
> put the original RAM back in and it is seated fine. But still nothing
> happens.
>
> The hard drive light on the front of the CPU will light up a couple
> times real quick before nothing else happens. Also, the light on the
> CD drive blinks throughout the process. The weird thing is the light
> around the power on/off switch will not come on at all, even though
> the hard drive light does come on. The CPU does beep once before no
> other sounds are heard at startup.
>
> I completely unplugged the CPU before I even took the case off. I
> touched a lot of metal before going inside the CPU to prevent static
> and only touched the outside wide edges of the RAM when inserting it.
> I read on a website of how to install new RAM that that was a good way
> to prevent static charges.
>
> But why won't the original RAM etc. . . work now?

Since all you did was take out and replace the RAM sticks a few
times, I'm going to take a guess and say that you cracked your
motherboard when you were seating them.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 4:20:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"herbiehusker" <husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
message news:41a63e0a$1_5@alt.athenanews.com...
> > But it doesn't explain why the problem's still there when this
> > person puts the 128 meg stick of RAM back in.
>
> Yep, that's what I'm baffled with.
>
> So let's say I brought a static charge to the computer when I went to
> change out the RAM. What would be the consequence of that? Would it
> fry my motherboard?

Very possibly. Static does not jump until it reaches around 500v, that's how
much of a shock YOU get getting out of your car. If the components are of
the CMOS variety they only use 7 to 15 volts, so YES static can easily fry
them.


Would that cause things to happen to my computer
> where I can't start it like is what is happening to me now with the
> original RAM back in?

Your board could still be good. Static is a nasty thing to trace. It could
go through one component but fry the next, so any one part of the board may
be down or any one of the other cards.

I've read where you should hear beeps from the
> motherboard telling you that RAM is bad or something else is bad but I
> hear one beep at the very beginning of the computer starting up and
> it's the same beep I hear at the beginning of starting the computer up
> when it is running fine.

Sorry that's my little bit done. Just remembered this from when I did my
Antistatic training for Clean Room work, while working for Hewllet Parkard.

I do seam to remember that when I was building PCs from parts found at
dumps, as you do, I tried to check boards, and cards without using the
expensive CPUs and stuff. I found that doing this nothing worked, until I
put the CPU in. This is what starts the feed to the screen, so you may have
killed your CPU with static. ???

OK just to let you know I'm guessing here, as I have built many, but usually
through trial and error fault finding rather than experience, so I'll leave
you with the other much more knowledgeable persons for how to track down the
fault, and hopefully fix it.

Best of luck Vaughn
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 4:26:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Nice to see my post was not completely incorrect. But hell did you put it
better. ;-)

You obviously posted yours while I was trying to remember what I knew.

Very good point on the 'step by step' part, and no ram check as it could be
his RAM or its location slot.

Putting this lot in the book of my own, thanks Vaughn


"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:41A681D7.8EC658F3@hotmail.com...
> If static discharged into computer, well, no one can say
> (with any accuracy) what did and did not happen. For example,
> CMOS ICs have internal protection that makes damage unlikely -
> or less likely. But first we must know what the incoming and
> outgoing paths of that discharge were. For example, the
> incoming path could have been your hands. Where on
> motherboard did that discharge occur? Many static discharges
> are not apparent. Some can take paths that are not
> destructive causing some computer assemblers to claim static
> protection is not necessary. Other static discharge can do in
> the complete board - again depending on the strength of that
> discharge and the path (incoming and outgoing) of that
> electrical current.
>
> For example, I did a bad. I discharged into the ethernet
> cable. That particular discharge was so violent as to pass
> through isolation transformer and damage the ethernet driver
> interface chip. I confirmed it with the o'scope (to provide
> some idea how technically informed my recommendations are
> based and what I require to make such a definitive
> conclusion).
>
> Now back to your problem. Previously posted is how one
> solved problems in a step by step (organized and informed)
> process. Possible to do damage to motherboard if RAM is not
> carefully installed - assuming other marginal conditions (ie
> slightly bent pin) exists. Not likely, but possible. Also
> possible that other unrelated failures occurred
> simultaneously. Anyone can speculate numerous failures as so
> many have done. To be informed, one first obtains facts.
> What happens when the system is started with no RAM - a very
> important symptom?
>
> herbiehusker wrote:
> > Yep, that's what I'm baffled with.
> >
> > So let's say I brought a static charge to the computer when I went to
> > change out the RAM. What would be the consequence of that? Would it
> > fry my motherboard? Would that cause things to happen to my computer
> > where I can't start it like is what is happening to me now with the
> > original RAM back in? I've read where you should hear beeps from the
> > motherboard telling you that RAM is bad or something else is bad but I
> > hear one beep at the very beginning of the computer starting up and
> > it's the same beep I hear at the beginning of starting the computer up
> > when it is running fine.
> >
> > /thank goodness for Thanksgiving Day sales tomorrow if I blew
> > something up
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 4:34:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"-Alby Hewlet" <bogus@nowhere.net> wrote in message
news:ZsSdnfD9u_nIGDvcRVn-3g@comcast.com...
> if you are geeting one beep, thaat is the post beep. power on self test.
> the mobo gives that if everything plugged into the mobo is ok. the logic
> then looks out chanel one eide and if it finds an operating system loads
it.
> it sounds like all is well until operating system starts to load. check
> cables to be sure not loose at hard drive or mobo. if have extra, just
> replace to be sure or swap with one running cdrom.
>
> do you have video? if not, reseat video card. Make sure monitor cable is
> good and plugged in at both ends. memory may be red herring here. could
be
> alls well but monitor bad. many times it is simple things causing errors,
> not complex ones.
>
> also. watch keyboard when you power up. if you get keyboard flash then
> mobo and cpu are good.
>
>

Going to put both feet Firmly into the back of my mouth, and just come out
with this.

I seem to remember that on some of the old Pcs I based together, if anything
was added to the PC, especially RAM, I often had to fully reset the Bios, so
would he have to now reset the video card, if AGP, and then HD type info if
not already set, or able to be set to AUTO??

Sorry if I'm asking the idiotic, but trying to learn here as well.

Thanks all Vaughn
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 6:02:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

ok, I'm not sure what I need to look for as far as the video card is
concerned. It is not a card that you can put in a PCI slot because the
only one in there is the modem one. I'm guessing it's something around
where the monitor is plugged in??

Also, when I turn the monitor on, the light blinks. On the monitor
there is a screen that flashes for about a minute that says the
monitor is working fine so check the CPU. When I turn the computer on
though, the monitor light still blinks and nothing comes up on the
screen.

I tried to reset the CMOS with the jumpers on the mobo. And I think I
did something wrong because now when I plug the computer back into the
wall the computer starts up without me having to hit the off/on
button??? I took the jumper and moved it to where the diagram said to
that was inside the computer. Still having the same problems even
after doing this.

I also removed all RAM and tried to start the computer to see what
happened and the same exact thing happens on start-up whether the RAM
is in or not??
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 12:24:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

herbiehusker wrote:
> Thanks guys for the help.
>
> I don't get anything on the computer screen. No BIOS or anything. The
> monitor says it's working fine and to check the CPU.

What? How does the monitor 'say' this if there's nothing on the monitor????


>
> And Tweek, you are right, the mobo has the 810e chipset so 512 won't
> work. That' good to know now, thanks for that. So will putting in the
> 512 overkill the motherboard since it can only take two 256?

no

>
> I double checked all the cables and they are all seated fine. I also
> put the original RAM back in and it is seated fine. But still nothing
> happens.

reset the cmos

>
> The hard drive light on the front of the CPU will light up a couple
> times real quick before nothing else happens. Also, the light on the
> CD drive blinks throughout the process. The weird thing is the light
> around the power on/off switch will not come on at all, even though
> the hard drive light does come on. The CPU does beep once before no
> other sounds are heard at startup.

You don't know what a CPU is, so I'll help you: the CPU is on chip that
plugs into the motherboard. It does not beep, nor does it have lights.

>
> I completely unplugged the CPU before I even took the case off. I
> touched a lot of metal before going inside the CPU to prevent static
> and only touched the outside wide edges of the RAM when inserting it.
> I read on a website of how to install new RAM that that was a good way
> to prevent static charges.
>
> But why won't the original RAM etc. . . work now?

use the reset jumper to reset the cmos



--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 5:03:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I am not sure what you did and did not do. You messages are
too summarized and not full of specific details. Jumper was
moved to reset BIOS? Then computer powered on? Then computer
power plug removed? Then restored BIOS reset jumper to its
original location. Did you do this?

As spodosaurus notes, post error messages exactly - word for
word - as they appear.

Unplug monitor from computer. Turn monitor on. Does it do
the same thing? Does it output exact same message?

herbiehusker wrote:
> ok, I'm not sure what I need to look for as far as the video card is
> concerned. It is not a card that you can put in a PCI slot because the
> only one in there is the modem one. I'm guessing it's something around
> where the monitor is plugged in??
>
> Also, when I turn the monitor on, the light blinks. On the monitor
> there is a screen that flashes for about a minute that says the
> monitor is working fine so check the CPU. When I turn the computer on
> though, the monitor light still blinks and nothing comes up on the
> screen.
>
> I tried to reset the CMOS with the jumpers on the mobo. And I think I
> did something wrong because now when I plug the computer back into the
> wall the computer starts up without me having to hit the off/on
> button??? I took the jumper and moved it to where the diagram said to
> that was inside the computer. Still having the same problems even
> after doing this.
>
> I also removed all RAM and tried to start the computer to see what
> happened and the same exact thing happens on start-up whether the RAM
> is in or not??
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 9:05:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

>
> Unplug monitor from computer. Turn monitor on. Does it do
> the same thing? Does it output exact same message?

The monitor does the same thing whether it is plugged into the back of
the computer tower or not. This is the exact wording of the message:

Self Test

Check your PC and signal cable

Monitor is working fine.

This message also blinks.


>
> I am not sure what you did and did not do. You messages are
> too summarized and not full of specific details. Jumper was
> moved to reset BIOS? Then computer powered on? Then computer
> power plug removed? Then restored BIOS reset jumper to its
> original location. Did you do this?

Yes, that's what I did, moved jumper, started computer up, then
powered it down by removing power plug, then put the jumper back to
the original location, but it was to reset the CMOS according to the
diagram on the inside of the computer. After doing this jumper reset,
the computer just powers itself on as soon as I plug it into the wall
for whatever reason. That's why I have to power the computer down by
pulling the plug, that and because nothing comes up on the screen.


>
> As spodosaurus notes, post error messages exactly - word for
> word - as they appear.

I don't get any error messages because the computer doesn't do
anything after the first beep. It's just on and running with nothing
happening.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 9:40:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

herbiehusker wrote:
> ok, I'm not sure what I need to look for as far as the video card is
> concerned. It is not a card that you can put in a PCI slot because the
> only one in there is the modem one. I'm guessing it's something around
> where the monitor is plugged in??

The monitor plugs into the video card. If the monitor plugs into the
motherboard, that means it has what is known as onboard video and you
can't really unseat it :-)

>
> Also, when I turn the monitor on, the light blinks. On the monitor
> there is a screen that flashes for about a minute that says the
> monitor is working fine so check the CPU.

What EXACTLY, word for word, does the message say?

> When I turn the computer on
> though, the monitor light still blinks and nothing comes up on the
> screen.
>
> I tried to reset the CMOS with the jumpers on the mobo. And I think I
> did something wrong because now when I plug the computer back into the
> wall the computer starts up without me having to hit the off/on
> button??? I took the jumper and moved it to where the diagram said to
> that was inside the computer. Still having the same problems even
> after doing this.

Did you move the jumper, power on, power off, and put the jumper back to
where it was originally?

>
> I also removed all RAM and tried to start the computer to see what
> happened and the same exact thing happens on start-up whether the RAM
> is in or not??

There should be beeping, something is really not right. What processor
is in your computer? Did you jar the heatsink or otherwise mess with
either the heatsink or the socket that the processor is in?

>


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2004 11:55:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Monitor displays a message that says no signal from video
card. Just another symptom that suggest something is wrong on
motherboard; that CPU is not telling video controller what to
do.

Motherboard has connections that can start a 'power on' when
connector receives signal. For example, if phone rings, then
signal from modem causes computer to turn on. Normally, the
BIOS disables (ignores) this signal. However, now that you
have reset CMOS, the default state may be 'power up on
signal'.

If nothing is connected to that connection, then noise (ie
radio waves) could trigger a response. That noise might be
'heard' by the BIOS. BIOS (due to enabled CMOS setting) then
turns on computer.

Definitions: BIOS is the program that CPU first executes on
power up. CMOS are BIOS options stored in non-volatile
memory. Jumper setting reset CMOS so that BIOS will execute a
default set of options.

Don't worry about this unexpected 'power on'. More worry
that you cannot get BIOS to finish its tasks and to load the
Operating System. Once we solve the original problem, then
later we can solve this unexpected 'power up' problem by
simply disabling BIOS option.

Currently you have one beep - then nothing. What happens
when all RAM is removed? Does the CPU get so far so to detect
missing RAM - and output a multiple beep error code? If not,
then disconnect those other devices and test again. If still
no multiple error code, then remove everything except speaker,
CPU, and power supply. If still no multiple beeps (that says
RAM is missing), then a short list of possible defective
hardware is known. Time to start looking for a 3.5 digit
multimeter. Sears Hardware is selling a stocking stuffer for
less than $20.

herbiehusker wrote:
>> Unplug monitor from computer. Turn monitor on. Does it do
>> the same thing? Does it output exact same message?
>
> The monitor does the same thing whether it is plugged into the back of
> the computer tower or not. This is the exact wording of the message:
>
> Self Test
>
> Check your PC and signal cable
>
> Monitor is working fine.
>
> This message also blinks.
>
>> I am not sure what you did and did not do. You messages are
>> too summarized and not full of specific details. Jumper was
>> moved to reset BIOS? Then computer powered on? Then computer
>> power plug removed? Then restored BIOS reset jumper to its
>> original location. Did you do this?
>
> Yes, that's what I did, moved jumper, started computer up, then
> powered it down by removing power plug, then put the jumper back to
> the original location, but it was to reset the CMOS according to the
> diagram on the inside of the computer. After doing this jumper reset,
> the computer just powers itself on as soon as I plug it into the wall
> for whatever reason. That's why I have to power the computer down by
> pulling the plug, that and because nothing comes up on the screen.
>
>> As spodosaurus notes, post error messages exactly - word for
>> word - as they appear.
>
> I don't get any error messages because the computer doesn't do
> anything after the first beep. It's just on and running with nothing
> happening.
November 28, 2004 3:42:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 18:45:48 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:

>> A lot of socket 370 Celeron machines were built with motherboards that use
>> the Intel 810e chipset. If that is the case, the maximum amount of ram the
>> board will take is two 256mb low density modules. Each module needs to have
>> sixteen chips on it, eight on each side. That may be your problem.
>
>But it doesn't explain why the problem's still there when this
>person puts the 128 meg stick of RAM back in.

If he thinks unplugging the PS is unplugging the CPU.....
He probably didn't notice that the ram is keyed to go in the slot only one way....

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 28, 2004 7:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

> Overlordwrote:
If he thinks unplugging the PS is unplugging the CPU.....
> He probably didn't notice that the ram is keyed to go in the slot
only one way....
>

WOW!!! Let's give it up for the POST OF THE YEAR! Can we give this
guy a trophy or something? Screw that, let's just give him the
Lombardi Trophy. Maybe I'll mention your name to Bill Gates and he can
hire you. Did you notice the sarcasm there . . . :roll:

Thanks to those who have actually read my posts and helped me with
intelligent ideas. Overbore, I mean, overlord, obviously can't read
that I am able to get the RAM seated properly, therefore I DID notice
how to put the RAM in.

I know what a CPU is. I was trying to make it simple. Usually the more
in depth you go, people don't understand. And when you hear
commercials for the Intel or AMD chips, you don't hear them refer to
them as CPU's do you? No, you don't. They are referred to as
processors.

Anyway, I'm still trying to get more than one beep from the
motherboard and will post again when I'm at my last straw. Thanks to
everyone . . . . except overlord.
November 29, 2004 10:55:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On 28 Nov 2004 16:13:12 -0500, husker_pimpin@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (herbiehusker) wrote:

>> Overlordwrote:
>If he thinks unplugging the PS is unplugging the CPU.....
>> He probably didn't notice that the ram is keyed to go in the slot
>only one way....
>>
>
>WOW!!! Let's give it up for the POST OF THE YEAR! Can we give this
>guy a trophy or something? Screw that, let's just give him the
>Lombardi Trophy. Maybe I'll mention your name to Bill Gates and he can
>hire you. Did you notice the sarcasm there . . . :roll:
>
>Thanks to those who have actually read my posts and helped me with
>intelligent ideas. Overbore, I mean, overlord, obviously can't read
>that I am able to get the RAM seated properly, therefore I DID notice
>how to put the RAM in.
>
>I know what a CPU is. I was trying to make it simple. Usually the more
>in depth you go, people don't understand. And when you hear
>commercials for the Intel or AMD chips, you don't hear them refer to
>them as CPU's do you? No, you don't. They are referred to as
>processors.
>
CPU , Central Processing Unit , or as you have it, processor.
Your having claimed there were lights on the CPU,
your having claimed you "unplugged the CPU" before pulling the ram,
and several other comments indicates you don't know what a CPU is.
The CPU will easily fit in your shirt pocket. The case won't.

Hopefully you didn't clear the CMOS with the system power up.
Put the jumper for clearing the cmos so it is only mounted on one of
the pins or even better, remove it entirely.

If it doesn't POST with it removed, try shorting the pins on the MB directly
with a small screwdriver (very temporarily) for pins that power up and the
pins that reset the system. I've had switches on cases go out before.
I've also had systems that wouldn't power up without the reset.
If that doesn't work, I'd go with the old standby of gutting the case and trying
to POST the system with motherboard, PS, CPU, heat sink, 1 stick of ram,
monitor, and an old known good PCI video card, on a foam block outside of the case.
I trust you've tried your old RAM in several different slots, assuming you have
more than one slot?

The possible causes are many; toasted EEPROM, bad power supply, popped
MB caps around the CPU, cracked 6 layer motherboard from reseating cards/
ram, static discharge to components, motherboard shorting to the case, etc.

Make sure your CPU fan on top of the heatsink is connected to the fan power
connector on the motherboard. Many motherboards will not even POST if they
don't detect current draw for the CPU fan.

Many times the best way to troubleshoot is to swap parts to another system
to see if they run at all; CPU, RAM, power supply, video card.
Don't even connect power or signal cables to the hard drives as they could be
causing a problem.

>Anyway, I'm still trying to get more than one beep from the
>motherboard and will post again when I'm at my last straw. Thanks to
>everyone . . . . except overlord.
>
If simple worked, you wouldn't be in here asking questions.
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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
November 29, 2004 8:08:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

herbiehusker wrote:

> I know what a CPU is. I was trying to make it simple. Usually the more
> in depth you go, people don't understand.

That's a completely backasswards way to do that on a newsgroup when
asking for technical help. We need those details, and you need to use
terms properly. Otherwise nothing gets done correctly.

> And when you hear
> commercials for the Intel or AMD chips, you don't hear them refer to
> them as CPU's do you? No, you don't. They are referred to as
> processors.

People here are a bit more advanced than the mouth breathing general
public. You still haven't caught on to that, and you still haven't
figured out how to properly post followup messages to newsgroups so that
they form a continuous or branching thread. So, everlord was expressing
some of the frustration that all of us are feeling with you. Don't hold
it against him, after a while someone was going to snap. Details are
extremely important here.


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
!